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Thread: Peasemarsh 14

  1. #1

    Default Peasemarsh 14

    I have an inflatable which I used as an intro to canoeing.
    Felt I liked it enough to have a rigid.

    I wanted a boat I could change and add things too and not care too much about drilling holes in or glueing stuff in.

    So I decided to do a self build. Plus I liked the idea of building my own boat.

    With full time job and two kids time was poor.
    So I have built this in 2-3 hour stints after 8pm at night when the kids are asleep.
    This meant that I could use a jigsaw or a sander as much as I'd liked.

    So in September I bought and cut wood.


    Then, got sidetracked into doing the loft as a play room for the kids and a 24 hours mtb race.

    I picked it back up in feb16 and stuck the bits together


    Then started stitching


    Then started glueing


    Then taping


    Then outer fillers


    Gunwales which was a bit of a pain


    I sheathed the bottom which I really wished I had not. It used a lot of resin so I ran out and had to order more which put the build cost up by £60.
    Also it looks awful and I did not have the time to sand and make good.
    It's also not needed I know now.


    Painted it


    Paddled it


    Overall pleased with it but still needs a lot of sanding and repainting. Need to work on house and garden but reckon by August should be able to make good then build out rigs and sailing rig.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Loughgall, Co. Armagh
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Looking good Stewart.
    I'm the same, tried it out with an inflatable and we all like it. Got the ply today and am waiting for the epoxy etc to arrive in the post.

    Michael

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Uckfield, United Kingdom
    Posts
    671

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    Nice job.
    I bought the plans for the Peasmarsh 12' last year as a pure solo boat. I'm still trying to find the time to start work on it.
    I was thinking of sheathing below the waterline as protection against rocks & scrapes. Why do you think its unnecessary?

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk
    There are three types of people in the world:
    Those who can count and those who can't.

  4. #4

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    There are thousands of mirror dinghies out there made the same way, itwas not needed on them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Uckfield, United Kingdom
    Posts
    671

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    You're right there. My dad had one he used to launch of the pebbles on Brighton beach and that never got damaged.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk
    There are three types of people in the world:
    Those who can count and those who can't.

  6. #6

    Default

    thanks Michael, good luck with your build.

    yeah the sheathing just cost money and time. I did it as this was a 1st "practice" build so I wanted to try things to know what to do (not to do) on the next one.
    plus when water gets in-between the sheath and the wood it stays there and rots the boat from the inside.
    Next time I will just put extra tape on the bow and stern like what people do on plastic ones. Maybe tape the lower outer chine.

  7. #7

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    Over all how long did it take to make?, I quite fancy making the 12' for a single seater

  8. #8

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    if I work it out from feb to april. 10 weeks doing ave 2 hours a night ave 5 nights a week. 100 hours.

    There are things that really slowed me down though due to being a total novice, and I reckon it would be quick if I had 7 hours on a Saturday available.

    Main things that took there time.

    TEMPERATURE, I was working in winter 5 degrees so my epoxy resin had to be warmed.
    I made a mistake gluing my top planks together so they didn't meet the bottom planks at the bow and stern. I had to sand and adjust the whole shape to allow for this, which lead to a lot extra filling and sanding.
    Gunwales. snapped a couple. ended up leaving them out in the rain. cutting numerous grooves on the inside and tapering at the ends.

    go for it. it's really rewarding.
    to get a boat that floats and works is dead easy. Mine is not pretty close up.....that would be the hard part that will come with practice and taking time.

  9. #9

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    Looks a great boat I’m building the Peasemarsh 14 and wondering what wood to use for the gun whales or rubbing boards , any tips would be great especially how you bent them

  10. #10

    Default Gunwhales ssue

    Iíve tried to send this message a few times si if you get lots off messages Iím sorry he he , your boat looks great , Iím building the same boat from the plans only and struggling to find suitable wood for the gunwhales or rubbing boards , would be greatful for any tips especially on bending it to canoe . Thanks

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    1,653

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haydn View Post
    Iíve tried to send this message a few times si if you get lots off messages Iím sorry he he , your boat looks great , Iím building the same boat from the plans only and struggling to find suitable wood for the gunwhales or rubbing boards , would be greatful for any tips especially on bending it to canoe . Thanks
    This thread is 2 years old now and the author of it last posted on the forum in April last year. I suspect you may wait a long time before getting a reply from him.

    Ash is a popular wood for gunwales. Sepale also works well. You really want clean bits with minimal knots. There has been a recent thread on gunwale material here:
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...9-Diy-gunwales

    From the looks of it, the author of this thread used pine of some sort and with a fair few knots in it. This would be a lot harder to bend without snapping it.

    Start in the middle and work out towards either end pulling/bending it into place and clamping it down with polyurethane adhesive. The more clamps you have, the more quickly you can get the job done. With more extreme bends, you may need to steam the wood but I think you'll be able to bend it by hand with the boat you're building. It really helps to have an assistant for the gunwales. One to hold it in place while the other applies the clamp.

    This is not the only way of doing it, have a look through some of the build bloggs. There will be very few of them which don't have wooden gunwales of some sort.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  12. #12

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    Still here lurking, just not paddling as much as Iíd like.

    I used strips from Homebase and b&q.
    Not the best but easy to get on my lunch break.
    I left them outside in the rain for a night.
    Cut notches in and screwed, glued and clamped in small stages.
    Snapped a few like but got there in the end.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #13

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    Thank you Stuart appreciate your help and good your still getting some paddling in lol

  14. #14

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    thank you for your help thought Ash would make a good looking boat but with no way of steaming it was rather hoping there would have been other softer options lol are well guess these things are to over come .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    cambs
    Posts
    1,597

    Default

    You can get a fair bit of bend in ash without steaming. I'd leave it somewhere wet for a week or so before using - ideally in water - especially at the ends where most bend is. If you have a helper to bend and hold as you clamp up it makes it easier. Also leave them long until you have them fixed. A foot length of extra leverage makes things go easier. If you are a varnish every surface sort of person, leave them fixed for a good few weeks (but still paddle it) before removing them and doing the back face.
    If there is anything more than a slight curve, I'd avoid sapele.

    Many softwoods are fine for gunnels, just in some cases a bit less durable. Old Town, Chestnut and most of the other wood canvas canoe makers used spruce on their basic models. Just use it without knots and keep up the maintenance. Softwoods will not bend as well as ash, being (usually) a bit more brittle.

    Sam

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by samB View Post
    You can get a fair bit of bend in ash without steaming. I'd leave it somewhere wet for a week or so before using - ideally in water - especially at the ends where most bend is. If you have a helper to bend and hold as you clamp up it makes it easier. Also leave them long until you have them fixed. A foot length of extra leverage makes things go easier. If you are a varnish every surface sort of person, leave them fixed for a good few weeks (but still paddle it) before removing them and doing the back face.
    If there is anything more than a slight curve, I'd avoid sapele.

    Many softwoods are fine for gunnels, just in some cases a bit less durable. Old Town, Chestnut and most of the other wood canvas canoe makers used spruce on their basic models. Just use it without knots and keep up the maintenance. Softwoods will not bend as well as ash, being (usually) a bit more brittle.

    Sam
    Thank you for the advice a little more confident now as this my first build had plans 5 years and keep putting off a lot of the time due to worry of the gunwhales , cheers Haydn

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Currently N. Somerset. Oftimes Quebec Province, Canada.
    Posts
    417

    Default

    I think that gunwales that are tapered ( in both depth and thickness ) for the last metre or so look very attractive - and do bend more easily! But try it with some scrap, why not?
    G

    'Adventure is relative. My adventure is another's commonplace.'

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Redcar on the North East Coast
    Posts
    497

    Default

    I agree with Grizzle. Tapered Gunwales are the way to go.

  19. #19

    Default

    I used white wood (whatever that is. Pine?) from Wickes on mine. Tried to get the best knot free wood I could find. Didn`t think to wet it but it was outside under a gazebo . It was raining so the air was pretty damp. Probably why I got away with it. Took the canoe into my living / dining room to do the epoxy. I am not allowed to live there any more.

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