Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Egret 14

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    16,625
    Journal Entries
    2

    Default Egret 14

    The Egret 14, from Burnett Boats, is a dedicated solo touring canoe.
    The hull has been computer designed to provide the best balance between stability, maneuverability and speed. Its asymmetric shape and gloss finish produce a low friction hull that makes covering those paddling miles a breeze.
    We've made buying and equipping the Egret 14 as simple as possible by including everything that you'll need as standard:

    • Built in buoyancy tanks - safety and dry storage combined.
    • Ash and cane seat.
    • Twin ash thwarts.
    • Closed cell foam kneeling mat.
    • Luggage tie down points.


    http://www.burnettboats.co.uk/egret-14
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    16,625
    Journal Entries
    2

    Default

    So it happened that I was first to get the Egret on its tour of the country to be reviewed. As a result it is up to me to start of the reviews.

    The Egret is a fibreglass canoe. 14 foot long and weighing about 22kg. It is finished with wooden gunwales and a kneeling thwart. It is well put together and feels solid in a way you can trust.

    Now canoes are quite a personal thing and we all like different aspects so this should be kept in mind when comparing what I think to what you may be looking for. Things to remember. I am a sitter, I do not kneel in my canoes and have never really needed too. I am a wanderer. I paddle in a straight line very little as I am constantly changing direction to explore this or that. Almost all of my canoe experience, certainly in the last few years, is in prospector style canoes that are as wide as barges

    Now I may be daft but I'm not stupid so for my first paddle I left Sam at home. 32kg of Rotty moving about was not a good idea. The first few minutes in the canoe was just a shock. This is a canoe far removed from the plastic barges I am used to. From the lack of oilcanning to the narrower rounder hull shape there was a lot of differences.

    I started off sitting on the kneeling thwart. You can do it but you really shouldn't. It makes your centre of gravity too high and made the canoe feel tippy.





    Of course if you really want to experience tippy, poling is the way to go, so I tried that. It was scary really scary. I don't think this canoe is intended for poling. That said I am sure you would get used to it stability wise but I am not sure how well it would turn for you. When poling you don't really have the option to heal it over as much to increase manoeuvrability.



    Okay enough of trying the canoe in ways it is not designed to be used. Time to kneel and paddle this properly.



    Now we are talking. Not surprisingly as soon as you start paddling the canoe the way it is intended you see where is shines. This is a canoe that will cover distance with efficiency. It tracks well and is not much effected by the wind. It also has plenty of freeboard so should be dry.



    On my next trip out I took Sam with me as I was feeling braver. She stayed pretty still but did help to give a feel for how the canoe would paddle loaded. It was probably a combination of me getting more used to the canoe and the lower centre of gravity from Sam being there but the canoe felt much more stable now. Despite my lack of kneeling experience I found I was getting pretty comfortable. The kneeling mat helped a lot. I would love to try this canoe with a seat, an inch or two lower than the kneeling thwart and a few inches further back.





    The Egret has little rocker. As a result it tracks well and as I have said would eat up the miles. Turning it is of course a bit more work than I am used to. I am told that when healed over it is much more responsive but I was not feeling that brave yet. This is where your preference comes to bare. You can't have a canoe that turns with ease and tracks like it is on rails. All canoes are on a spectrum between the extremes of these. this canoe is nearer rails end. This is no bad thing but it is not my preference. I like to turn my canoe often. I am forever stopping and spinning the canoe just for the joy of it. As I say this can be done if you heal the canoe but I was not at the level of comfort in the canoe yet.



    I really liked the size of the canoe. I was also very taken with the freeboard. This is a canoe that has plenty of capacity of gear. It is deceptive as I kept thinking it would be too small but when I was in it and looking about it was clear there was loads of spaces for pack and the dog.



    Paddling the Egret has made me think very hard about changing my canoe fleet. I feel a solo canoe close to this would get a lot of use. If this had a few inches of rocker and a seat fitted instead of a kneeling thwart I think I would be buying one of these. There is nothing I could fault in the construction and the Egret is lighter than my 15 foot royalex Wenonah Prospector. It also has no oil canning and slips through the water in a way plastic canoes just don't. If you don't have my obsession with turning and spinning a canoe all the time then the Egret is something I suspect you will find very appealing as a solo canoe.



    Thankfully the burden of this review is less than usual as I know it will be one of many as this canoe works its way round the country. This should give you a well rounded view of this canoe and how it paddles. I suspect it has been an expensive review for me as it has stirred a strong desire for a canoe similar but not quite this one. I can see the upcoming Quetico 15 from Burnett Boats being a bit tempting. If it was in a kevlar or carbon mix it would really be a strong draw for me.



    So there you go, my rambling thoughts. Any questions let me know, although I expect more details will come from the reviews to follow.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Thanks John,
    That all sounds very fair.
    It was great to meet you....can you tell me what colour of Quetico 15 would make it irresistible?
    Robert.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    16,625
    Journal Entries
    2

    Default

    Probably green or black but that's a whole new can of worms. Lets say whatever colour is lightest
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Quarriers Village
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by magikelly View Post
    probably green or black but that's a whole new can of worms. Lets say whatever colour is lightest
    blue!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Barrow in Furness
    Posts
    725

    Default

    Nice review of a nice boat! I'm sure we'd all be interested to hear how the Quetico build is progressing. Don't forget, Team CRAP will have plenty willing of and able test pilots!
    Andy,
    (Cumbria)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    684

    Default

    I'm going to take the liberty of reposting Dougoutcanoe's FB comments from his time with the Egret:



    I did an hour of paddling the Egret 14 "Nue" canoe on the Rufford Branch of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The weather was sunny and the wind not too strong.After the first few seconds of floating I settled in to paddle. I thrashed up and down a short stretch and she can move! To turn easily requires more edging than I initially applied but I soon had the edging sorted. She nestles very comfortably into the gunwales only a few inches above the water and feels more stable edged than flat.
    Initial feelings after a short paddle are: a great little boat, fast, stable, comfortable, easy straight running, was not pushed off line by the wind, light weight and easy to handle off the water.
    https://youtu.be/KICDMhWnD7E
    Thanks Robert for a great little boat.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    563

    Default

    Embedding the video:



    Impressive pace for such a short boat!
    -------------------------
    You! Off my planet!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southport, really in Lancashire, UK
    Posts
    1,880

    Default

    The Wobbly Water Group trialled the Egret canoe and found her to be pleasant to handle, straight running (like on rails) but a bit of a struggle to turn in the constraints of a canal. The turning ability improves with familiarity and the use of edging.

    She paddles easily and definitely more miles per paddle stroke, her glide is impressive too.

    I took her out on the Rufford Branch of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal for an hour or so. Within seconds the initial wobbles eased and paddling was easy. Wind seems to have little effect on her tracking or travel into or with the wind.

    I have a We No Nah Escapade and would say the Egret is easier and faster to handle than solo in the Escapade.

    The slow turning was mentioned by all. I did find turning in open water very acceptable.

    Some, were not sure about the aesthetics of the almost straight sheer line, which made her look rather flat.

    Here's a short video of the Wobbly Water Group Egret Experience.



    Doug
    When there's trouble on shore, there's peace on the wave,
    Afloat in the White Canoe.
    Alan Sullivan


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Merthyr Tydfil South Wales
    Posts
    733

    Default

    I have had the demonstrator for a couple of weeks and feel I got to know it well.

    The first trip was on the Wye from Ross to Lydbrook in a strong southerly wind, I was immediately impressed by its ability to punch into the wind with little need to adjust trim, at first I found it a little hard to turn but once used to the edging required found it a pleasure to put into eddies.

    I then used it on some lakes near home to feel for the limits of stability and general feel,whilst having relatively low initial stability it can be heeled right over to the gunnels and still feel safe.

    The final trip was a 2 day Wye run from Glasbury to Bredwardine during which it was paddled by a range of people, I found I could surf it on some play waves and was very impressed whilst watching other people paddling it with the way it seemed to be perfectly trimmed.

    In conclusion this is an ideal boat for a solo long river tour (Thames , severn etc) but probably not the boat for me as I prefer a bit higher grade of water.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Barrow in Furness
    Posts
    725

    Default

    The more people write about this boat the more it becomes apparent that it is the perfect Lakeland cruiser - goes quick and well in a straight line and I've seen Rob paddle it through some pretty big chop on Condition and Wastewater. If you're a big lake or canal paddler this could be the boat for you.
    Andy,
    (Cumbria)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Thanks for the review Paul (nantcoly), it sounds like you had a pleasant couple of days paddling with the Egret.
    I'm pleased to hear that people recognise it's abilities to cover long distances as well as it's being stable and maneuverable once you get the feel of the hull.
    Your comments about bumpy water are fair, that's not what it was designed for although they have been thrown down some quite bumpy stuff in their time.
    One of the things I'm hoping that this trial will show people is that there are alternatives to the "classic prospector" canoe......or rather that many paddlers, realistically, spend a lot of time traveling in a, more or less, straight line and you don't have to waste effort on constantly correcting your heading. You don't have to waste energy driving forwards a hull intended to carry three men and a dog......as well as the stove, dutch oven and canvas tent.
    Anyway, I'm glad you enjoyed it and grateful that you could send it on the first part of it's journey onwards.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •