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Thread: New tent review: Quechua, Quick Hiker, Ultra Light 2.

  1. #1
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    Default New tent review: Quechua, Quick Hiker, Ultra Light 2.

    I've been missing a lightweight, compact backpacking tent since the demise of my Vango Banshee 200. I've been using a quechua pop-up tent from Decathlon for short solo camping but it is not particularly compact or lightweight. It has proven extremely robust and well thought out as well as being ludicrously quick and easy to use.

    I thought the brand was worth a look and I found their Quechua, Quick Hiker, Ultra Light 2. Not an ideal canoe tent as it's not self-supporting but at 2kg, folding to a cylinder 40x12cm and sleeping two, you're pushing hilleberg levels of weight and compactness.

    It looks broadly similar to the banshee 200 but is, certainly on first impression, better in almost every way (and I lived in a Banshee 200 for 3 months so I know what I'm talking about). It's a bit bigger, it packs a bit smaller, it's lighter (2kg actual pack weight with everything in) and is quicker and easier to put up. It's also made from better materials.

    At £110, it's the cheapest tent I've ever seen that comes with DAC alloy poles and pegs.

    The other thing quechua make a point of doing is dynamically testing their tents. While it's only PU coated nylon, they set the tents up and deluge them with 200 litres per hour per square metre for 4 hours (so that's 3 inches of rain in four hours, similar to the levels of rainfall seen in the recent Lake District floods).

    They also errect them on a turntable in a wind tunnel and test them up to 70km/h (force 8) at ground level from all directions. It's a safe bet they'll stand up to much more if hit from the end.

    2 year warranty.

    I honestly can't see the catch and if it proves to be as waterproof as their popups (and mine has taken the worst rain the West coast of Scotland could throw at it) it looks like I'm onto a winner.

    I've done a video of it being put up and down and a bit of me wittering on about it.

    https://youtu.be/bxZKV3MvI9A



    I'll report back once I've used it in anger.
    Last edited by stinkwheel; 20th-March-2016 at 10:34 PM.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  2. #2
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    Looks pretty good, especially at that price point and a better inner footprint than the TN Laser Comp/WC Zephyros 2 format I'm familiar with (a 1.5 person '2 person' tent)

    Be interested to see how you get on with it.

  3. #3
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    Being over in decathlon land, I've quite a bit of gear from them and have used the non-UL version for about 5 years up till now with no issues at all .... still going strong and will for some time yet I'd say.
    I looked at these recently when supplementing the gear with UL stuff but ended up getting an Exped Mira as i already have an Ionesphere for solo and I really wanted a 2 body tent .... this would have been tight for this body in particular when 2 up
    interesting to see how it goes though
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Canoe outfitting packages in the Massif Central


  4. #4
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    Looks like great value for money. As you point out, the only thing against it is that its not freestanding, but I'm (slowly) coming around to that not being as big an issue for a small tent as it might be. I'll be interested to see if you get much condensation.


    Quote Originally Posted by MarkL View Post
    Being over in decathlon land, I've quite a bit of gear from them and have used the non-UL version for about 5 years up till now with no issues at all .... still going strong and will for some time yet I'd say.
    Ah, is that the one you had in Sweden? Looked good, though the pair of you were snuggled in it with less space than me on my own in mine!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Looks like great value for money. As you point out, the only thing against it is that its not freestanding, but I'm (slowly) coming around to that not being as big an issue for a small tent as it might be. I'll be interested to see if you get much condensation.




    Ah, is that the one you had in Sweden? Looked good, though the pair of you were snuggled in it with less space than me on my own in mine!
    yep, that's the fellow. It has done a lot of work over the years and is still going without issues. Space wise, you are correct that it didn't have the same as your luxe (or the new Exped) but it is workable (Louise is only a tiny thing) and both sides open and it takes seconds to put up alone and ....

    The decathlon gear I've used has been good, especially when the price is considered. I look forward to seeing how this one works out.
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Canoe outfitting packages in the Massif Central


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkL View Post
    The decathlon gear I've used has been good, especially when the price is considered.
    Yep, agree with that.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    I'll be interested to see if you get much condensation.
    Obviously not tested it fully yet but my first impression is of pretty thorough ventilation. There is a mesh section under the kind of rain flap bit on either end of the tent and the inner has loads of mesh in its construction. Almost enough I'd be concerned about it being a bit on the draughty side.

    Mrs stinkwheel thought the silver colour would help delay being chased out of bed by the sun in the summer.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  8. Default

    This looks neat and lightweight, definitely good for summer camping. The price is quite tempting too!

  9. #9
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    Decathlon, and Quechua specifically for tents, do some nice stuff, especially when cost comes into the equation!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by laurence milton View Post
    Decathlon, and Quechua specifically for tents, do some nice stuff, especially when cost comes into the equation!
    .....but recently it seems that they have cut their range of tents severely

  11. #11

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    I was determined to get the 3 person version of this last year (for all the same reasons) to accommodate daughter and 2 mates on her DofE trip. however everytime I went to order it (after payday) they were out of stock. We ended up with a wild country Hoolie 3 instead. A good and roomy tent, but occupies way too much room in a backpack /backpacks. The Quechua tents are, as you observe full of innovative features and well thought out design. The balance of room, packed weight and size, price and build quality are about spot on. Someone has earned their salary at Quechua design. As for Vango - they are a polar opposite of this company. A few years ago I pointed out by email to them, that the quoted weights of all their tents online were given in grams (rather than kilograms).Backpacking tents at only 2 grams and so on?!! Karma prevents me from posting further criticism of them online. If only the British tent producers could bring out similar products for a price lower than a used car!

  12. #12
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    An update on this tent. It just got tested hard.

    Last Saturday. Campsite near Beddgelert in North Wales at the Dragon motorcycle rally.

    Pitching conditions: Standing water over most of the field. Muddy underfoot where pitched. Full guyrope deployment to maximum distance.

    Overnight weather conditions: Force 4-5 winds gusting at times to gale force or higher with driving sleet and snow. Strong enough winds to topple over portaloos and totally flatten around 1 in 20 of the tents in the field.

    In the morning my tent was still standing. Everything in the inner tent still dry, no damage to the tent or poles, no pegs uprooted. 100% sucess.

    One note though. Snow tends to build up on the long flat pitch over the "leg" section of the tent causing it to push down on my knees a couple of times through the night. A gentle push up from the inside saw it slide down off the end though.

    Minimum of condensation inside despite freezing overnight temperatures.

    So far two summers use from this tent and now passed a very severe test. Still impressed and happy with my purchase.







    Also now on year 5 of my cheap Chinese camping chair.

    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  13. #13
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    Impressive. Its always nice to wake up still warm and dry with a roof over your head after a storm. Still slightly surprised you fit in it if I'm honest

    When I was a kid, there were tent shows on in the local park. One year, it snowed heavily with strong winds. My dad bought the only tent still standing.

    A large part of it is also how well you pitch it, lots are shockingly loose and flappy when they would be fine if taut.

    Llyn Gwynant? Like the bike trailer!

  14. #14
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    There was some very poor decision making in terms of guyrope deployment in evidence it must be said.

    Yes, Llyn Gwynant. There was some discussion as to if a 12ft ply canoe made in 2-pieces would be trailer mountable. The conclusion was it would probably be pushing my luck further than I am already in terms of construction and use regs.

    I'm also getting the hang of putting this tent back in the bag. It's tricky because it has small stubby poles built in at either end and the main pole is captive next to the pole sleeve. The trick is to fold it in half lengthways and align the various poles perpindicular to the bottom of the flysheet. Then fold the top down towards the bottom edge to set the rolled length. You then roll it round the poles, picking up each bundle as you go and it should slip neatly intothe bag.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  15. #15
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    Blimey, didn't know the Dragon rally was still going. Did it back in the late 70's in Force 10 (tent not wind) what's the interesting looking bike?
    Paul
    Just goin with the flow

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    The bike is a Royal Enfield Bullet 350 with a modern copy of a Czech made PAV trailer. The bike was made in 2007 in India but is a 1950's design.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  17. #17
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    Enfield India bullet ???
    This post may vanish at any moment.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkwheel View Post
    The bike is a Royal Enfield Bullet 350 with a modern copy of a Czech made PAV trailer. The bike was made in 2007 in India but is a 1950's design.
    Looks like a useful rallying set up. My mate had an Enfield 250 'cafe racer' and it was the first bike I ever rode, along the front at Beaumaris. Always thought that was a bullet but could have been a crusader. The only original thing was the frame and engine. It wasn't one made in India though, it was a 1950's British built job. leaked oil badly and broke down like most/all/some British bikes (of that era) it was like riding on a permanent oil slick. Nothing behind the crankcase ever went rusty though, so not all bad. How are the newer ones regards reliability leaks etc? The new Enfield Continental GT is gorgeous, if I went back to biking that would be the one for me.
    Paul.
    Just goin with the flow

  19. #19
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    The one I have is really very much like the 50's ones. Main difference is 12v electrics but it even still has points and a mechanical ignition advance. I've got it oiltight though. The bullets weren't actually all that bad for leaks. As long as you can stop it leaking round the drain plugs and top-end engine gaskets, it's pretty good because they (unlike many) used a paper gasket between the two crankcase halves and a huge o-ring on the primary transmission case. It's proven both very reliable and very badly made. So it has all sorts of things go wrong with it (I now treat pistons as a consumable) but none of them actually stop it running and they're easy to fix.

    The NEW new ones are unit construction. So a more modern engine design. The new continental GT is that type of engine. Still not without issues. Noteably starter motor clutch failures. They just brought out another new one in the last week or so called a Himalayan which is a 450cc adventure bike type thing. Looks like a modern motorcycle. They are on the verge of releasing a 650cc twin which is a brand new engine but looks suitably retro.

    I'm currently in the process of building and tuning a 500 bullet, taking it out to 612cc and aiming for a 150% increase in power output. Should do more than 55mph!
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  20. #20
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    Won't comment on the bike things but it is good to hear the update on the tent after some real use.

    It must be a good option for many based on this review.
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Canoe outfitting packages in the Massif Central


  21. Default

    Thanks for the video review. It's so useful to see it in real life, I find that pictures never do tents justice. I was in two minds between this and the MSR Remote 2 https://www.backpacker.com/gear/msr-remote-2. I used https://professionalcamping.com/best-instant-tents/ to help me when I was choosing. I hope this helps someone in the same boat! I went for the MSR Remote 2 in the end. It's a great little tent.

  22. #22
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    I'm afraid inner pitch first is a deal-breaker for me these days. I've long since given up trying to peg down a flapping, airborne flysheet over a buckling inner which is rapidly filling its bathtub groundsheet with water.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  23. #23
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    I’ve been surprised how many tents are now inner first pitching. Seems like a no brainer that fly first is better but as I’m pretty much always sleeping under a tarp it’s not much of an issue for me

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