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Thread: Ortlieb 60L Duffel vs Lomo 40L Holdall

  1. #1
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    Default Ortlieb 60L Duffel vs Lomo 40L Holdall

    Ortlieb 60L Duffel vs Lomo 40L Holdall

    Or

    Searching for the Ultimate Dry Bag


    I’ve been using the Lomo 40L and 60L bags for some while. I really like the holdall style bag, they make it so much easier to get at your stuff, and stop that need to get everything out to find anything.

    I’ve been using the 60L for multi-day trips (along with a main rucksack), and using the 40L for WW paddling trips.

    This is really about replacing the 40L bag.

    Why replace it?

    Well, the main problem I find is carrying them, the shoulder strap is a real pain, and the bags can be quite heavy. I’ve broken one shoulder strap carrying out from the river. In addition to this the 60L failed quite badly during a pin on the Dochart earlier this year, and that really ticked me off.

    Why are they heavy? Good question. Here’s what I normally carry on a WW day.

    Flask
    Lunch + extra food
    Pin Kit
    First Aid Kit
    Blizzard Bag
    Ground Mat
    Seat pad
    Repair Kit
    Head Torch
    Light Sticks
    Sunglasses
    Spare hats and gloves (for me and anyone else)
    Spare fleece top (sometimes worn if it’s cold)
    Belay Jacket (for standing around waiting for shuttles).
    Water bottle
    Keys, Phone.
    Camera
    Tarp (sometimes)

    Some of these things are not always in the bag, but are in my boat whilst paddling, but as soon as it’s carry time they go in the bag. Hence the weight.

    Could I dump some of this stuff? Yeah I guess so. But I try to be reasonably well equipped in a leaderish sort of way.

    So, time for a change of bag?

    But what to change to?

    The quality holdall of choice appears to be the Watershed Yukon. A nice 70L bag with a Ti zip. But it still has a shoulder strap. I really don’t get the obsession with the shoulder strap. Just because a bag is holdall style why can it still not be a rucksack?

    Enter the Ortlieb 60L Duffel. It has both the main features I like. Rucksack straps and Ti zip giving it IP7 waterproofing and IP6 Dustproofing.

    I am not worried about dust!

    Size comparison

    Ortlieb 60l Duffel

    Dimensions 60cm x 29cm x 58cm = 58.8 litres

    Lomo 40l Holdall

    Dimensions 59cm x 29cm x 32cx = 54.7 litres

    So you can see everyone has very different ideas about volume.

    Is it any good. Well I haven’t used it so these are just first impressions.

    Material
    It is made from something called “PD 620” which looks like a form of Vynil. Ortlieb say it is a specially designed material and it is described here... http://www.ortlieb.com/t-material.php?lang=en

    It looks pretty tough from the graphs, but less so in the flesh. Personally I think Cordura (which Lomo use) takes some beating.

    Build Quality
    Build quality looks very high. Everything looks put together very solidly. The straps are on large panels which appear to be glued along their entire length. Stitching might have been stronger, but interferes with the integrity I guess.

    The bag has a woven base material on top of the PD620 to improve wear. It looks like Cordura to me.

    Tie Downs
    It’s a bit lacking in tie down points at the ends. It has these odd fold/clips to keep the Ti zip under control. They are very robust, but they are quite hard to release. I worry that these will become wear points in time.

    There are lots of good tie downs on the strap panels, plus some on the straps themselves.

    Straps

    The carry straps are nice and wide, but not padded. This is good for portage distance. The spacing feels good and so far the bag sits nicely on my back.

    Extras

    There is a nice mesh pocket on the outside. I like pockets on the outside. Not everything needs to stay dry and I like to put my snickers bar somewhere.

    There are a couple of small pockets inside which is useful.

    There is an internal strap to pull the bag into shape.

    Price

    OK, this is where it gets painful.

    The Lomo bag is a snip at £20.99.

    The Ortlieb is a shocking £136 although you can find it for close to £100 if you shop around.

    That’s a big difference. I imagine the Ti zip makes up for a lot of it.

    Is it worth it? You decide.

    For me only time will tell.

    Photos

    Side by side


    Lomo tie downs


    Lomo up close




    Ortlieb Duffel up close


    Ortlieb Zip Clips




    Ortlieb Straps


    Ortlieb Mesh Pocket


    Ortlieb Cordura Base


    Ortlieb Interior


    Ortlieb Internal Pocket
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  2. #2
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    Looks good, nice write up Matt. I've Ortlieb panniers for my push bike and they are very well designed and of decent quality.

    Watershed do make a back pack but it looks bigger, I've their 30L Chatooga duffel which I can just squeeze my kit into for a day on WW although I'm missing a bit of the full leader kit, and my flask goes under the airbag lacing. I think under 40L is pushing it.

    Whilst I like the Lomo brand and have a few items of their kit I'm happy with, I've had little luck with their drybags in immersion situations.

  3. #3
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    I've been using an Ortlieb for a year and it is definitely my dry bag of choice because I have confidence that anything in it has a good chance of surviving if I end up swimming. When the bag is stuffed full I can portage with the yoke riding on the bag instead of my shoulders.
    Its not easy to operate the zip when you are in the canoe as I need to use both hands and a fair amount of determination so I would recommend a net bag for a drink bottle and waterproof camera store.
    ----------------------



    I suspect I may be a figment of my own imagination.

  4. #4
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    I've had an Ortlieb holdall for about 7 years! It sat on the back of my beemer across north Africa and across Europe in all sorts of weather! I remember riding across Germany where it lashed down for over 200 mile! On arrival in Munich, not one drop of water entered that bag!

    It may be expensive, but when you consider how long it could last?
    Last edited by dirtydog; 14th-October-2014 at 06:33 PM.

  5. #5
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    I use an Overboard bag (see here) 60L and I really like it. It has mesh pockets both inside and out, and a zipped dryish internal pocket too. It has a shoulder strap that I've yet to use as I can use the handles as two shoulder straps like a rucksack for short distances. Its sort of in between the other two in price so might be a compromise worth looking at.

    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  6. #6
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    matt I use a lomo holdall but would only use it for interesting WW with exped bags inside it as I think any rollover holdall is suspect in WW pin situation due to pressure.
    in my pin I had a barrel which ripped the tie downs off my boat and really got trashed but remained totally dry. the lomo would have failed as it is not designed for a WW thrashing.
    a good alternative is separate ( labelled) small bags all together in an old rucksack ( maybe from a carboot) or even a cheap new one.
    this option is way cheaper and way more flexible in terms of what bags you put in it. the main bag protects the inner exped bags so you don't have to be precious with it and it has pockets on the outside for those bits and pieces.
    I also use a lomo rucksack/drybag ( 20 something quid) with small exped bags in it for the same reason
    nature is m X-box

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by andym View Post
    matt I use a lomo holdall but would only use it for interesting WW with exped bags inside it as I think any rollover holdall is suspect in WW pin situation due to pressure.
    in my pin I had a barrel which ripped the tie downs off my boat and really got trashed but remained totally dry. the lomo would have failed as it is not designed for a WW thrashing.
    a good alternative is separate ( labelled) small bags all together in an old rucksack ( maybe from a carboot) or even a cheap new one.
    this option is way cheaper and way more flexible in terms of what bags you put in it. the main bag protects the inner exped bags so you don't have to be precious with it and it has pockets on the outside for those bits and pieces.
    I also use a lomo rucksack/drybag ( 20 something quid) with small exped bags in it for the same reason
    That's exactly what I do, but in the event, most of the inner dry bags failed as well, and almost everything got wet (except my sleeping bag fortunately). I was not impressed. That's never happened before.

    The inner dry bags were a mix of exped, and karrimor. They both performed about the same.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  8. #8
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    I use a Watershed duffle which is absolutely solid but without shoulder straps, it is not great for portaging. Fortunately I try to portage as little as possible, afterall, it's not paddlesport. I clip my bag onto the front seat with nylon luggage straps with Fastex buckles, I wonder if you could fit them onto the Ortlieb bag through the loops down the sides (if they are loops)

  9. #9
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    I'm currently upgrading my Dry bag collection, and bought an Ortleib large roll top dry bag with rucksack straps (109L) last week. Looks great so far. I really like the look of the Duffel. I too use the Lomo, but don't trust it to keep vital stuff dry in anything other than rain. Its relegated to "kitchen" stuff that can get wet now. I've successfully portaged using the holdall straps as rucksack straps before though. Successfully but far from comfortably!!!

    I might just have to be tempted by the Ortleib duffel at some point. Where did you get it from?
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  10. #10
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    ----------------------



    I suspect I may be a figment of my own imagination.

  11. #11
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    Bought mine from Cotswold Outdoor online. BCU 15% discount came in handy.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    Bought mine from Cotswold Outdoor online. BCU 15% discount came in handy.
    Ta mate.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  13. #13
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    Looks like a decent bit of kit, will be good to see how the zip holds up. I've had a Yukon for about 5 years and hardly use it because it's more of a pain for any portage compared to a rucksack style.
    More importantly Matt's buying WW kit

  14. #14
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    I got a Lomo and fitted my own dry zip which I took from a 'dead' dry suit.

    it took about an hour to do and is 100% tight.

    Lomo bags are no good without the zip because it is impossible to get a decent seal over that length of opening.
    If it wasn't for the rain in our lives there would be no rivers. X 2

  15. #15
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    I liked nige's idea, he canabalised an old rucksack and fitted a 30l barrel into it so he has straps for carrying, a bombproof barrel and pockets for extras.
    nature is m X-box

  16. #16
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    A standard airline bag is about 40 litres so it seems strange that the makers of these specialist items don't make a bag to these approximate dimensions. Watershed do 50l or 25l.

  17. #17
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    Maybe Aqua Quest 50L - £49.00 on Amazon might be worth an audition I've got the 75L version that I use (on the few times ventured) for weekend trips. Within which I can get pretty much everything I need for a weekend in the 1 bag. Bit stuffed though if it did leak/get lost!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    A standard airline bag is about 40 litres so it seems strange that the makers of these specialist items don't make a bag to these approximate dimensions. Watershed do 50l or 25l.
    I guess the number of jet setting paddlers is still relatively low Adrian.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  19. #19
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    As a general update the Ortlieb 60L Duffel has performed admirably during last winter's white water season (which to be fair got a bit limited due to various factors), and a couple of multi-day trips on the Spey and around Morvern both of which came with heavy rain and fair amount of water in the boat. All my gear was kept perfectly safe and dry, and the bag held up perfectly and was a pleasure to use.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    I guess the number of jet setting paddlers is still relatively low Adrian.
    Ever increasing, I have exactly the same dilemma and need to get it sorted by next Friday!
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    As a general update the Ortlieb 60L Duffel has performed admirably during last winter's white water season (which to be fair got a bit limited due to various factors), and a couple of multi-day trips on the Spey and around Morvern both of which came with heavy rain and fair amount of water in the boat. All my gear was kept perfectly safe and dry, and the bag held up perfectly and was a pleasure to use.
    I have the 85L Duffel and its absolutely superb. It has taken a bath twice, floating upside down with the zip lowest, and not a drop has come in. It feels like it will last for years.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Ever increasing, I have exactly the same dilemma and need to get it sorted by next Friday!
    I use one of these: http://www.exped.com/switzerland/en/...s/torrent-40-1 and it's perfect to use as hand luggage, and obviously as a day sack or food pack when you're out in the field.

    Tough little pack as well...served us well being dragged round Algonquin and Glaskogen last year, and I'll probably be using it for this year trip in Glaskogen.

    Fred

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    Quote Originally Posted by scoutmaster View Post
    I use one of these: http://www.exped.com/switzerland/en/...s/torrent-40-1 and it's perfect to use as hand luggage, and obviously as a day sack or food pack when you're out in the field.

    Tough little pack as well...served us well being dragged round Algonquin and Glaskogen last year, and I'll probably be using it for this year trip in Glaskogen.

    Fred
    Looks good. I have a Gourdon from Alpkit, but its only 30L. My other problem is what to do with the Peli case for the camera...not sure if the airline allow that separately as a "small" item.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Looks good. I have a Gourdon from Alpkit, but its only 30L. My other problem is what to do with the Peli case for the camera...not sure if the airline allow that separately as a "small" item.
    Do you have any extra space in your hold luggage to stow it away in?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by scoutmaster View Post
    Do you have any extra space in your hold luggage to stow it away in?
    I don't think so, but I might try, possibly taking out the foam first so I can use the space inside, and squash the foam into somewhere else...but worried the foam won't return back to shape. Anyway, gone a bit off topic, will find a solution this weekend! May just use my 40L climbing sack with drybag liner.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  26. #26
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    Well a 3 year update on the Ortlieb. It has performed admirably and been my go to bag for all WW trips and multi-day expeditions - where it serves as day bag storing food and cooking gear mostly. The duffel style bag is really useful for this as it opens wide for easy access. Sadly at the end of our recent Ardeche trip, the zip jumped and became separated. I contacted Ortlieb to see if repair was possible, and they put me in touch with Lyon Outdoor, the UK importer who kindly offered to take a look at it under warranty. Today a brand new one arrived unannounced in the post. Apparently they take that 5 year warranty seriously. Now that's good customer service.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  27. #27
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    I got similar good service from Watershed but, like you, my go-to bag is the Ortlieb

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    Well a 3 year update on the Ortlieb. It has performed admirably and been my go to bag for all WW trips and multi-day expeditions - where it serves as day bag storing food and cooking gear mostly. The duffel style bag is really useful for this as it opens wide for easy access. Sadly at the end of our recent Ardeche trip, the zip jumped and became separated. I contacted Ortlieb to see if repair was possible, and they put me in touch with Lyon Outdoor, the UK importer who kindly offered to take a look at it under warranty. Today a brand new one arrived unannounced in the post. Apparently they take that 5 year warranty seriously. Now that's good customer service.
    Exactly the same has happened to mine. I managed to somehow bodge the zip back together, but it went again later. I haven't yet managed to get my act together to return it to Lyon, its been sat ready to go for ages. I will now!

    I've actually found myself preferring the big red 109L roll-top version, just for the fact it portages better. When I was always carrying two big bags when camping, the zip-entry one was great as access during the day, but now I've got my kit down to less I'm using a daysack as a second bag. If portaging isn't necessary, the zip-entry is far superior...except I will now have a nagging doubt about the strength of the zip when on wilderness trips...
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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  29. #29
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    My Ortlieb is in it's third year of being mine and having endured a bit of a swim with it every thing stayed bone dry.

    What I will add is - so did my 60ltr Lomo which had the Tipi in! (Tentipi 5 fits in perfect along with tarp & tarp kit) for someone on a budget who doesn't want to spend££££ at £24 its a steal
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  30. #30
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    I have the Lomo. Very nice bag as long as it does not go into the water. The water comes in immediately from both ends even when nicely folded and secured. Due to its design the ends are never tight enough to avoid water getting in. Disappointing, the price being attractive. Nothing beats Ortlieb.

  31. #31

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    Coming at this from a slightly different perspective (kayak, mostly day trips with the odd overnighter) I have found that the Lomo one is great for carrying stuff that wouldn't degrade if wet, and a bunch of smaller Alpkit drybags. I also have a few additional Alpkit Airlok Xtra bags of various sizes that I use to hold stuff that must not get wet, and stuff I want to keep in the cockpit with me. Never had stuff that had to keep dry get wet, and the tie on points of the Airlok Xtra are awesome for fixing stuff in place if needs be.

    Would love to be able to use (and afford!) an Ortlieb bag, but hatches mean that multiple smaller bags work best.

    For open boat use (Mirror Dinghy) I have a rolltop drybag with rucksack straps when I need to carry a lot of gear, and an Alpkit Gourdon 20 when carrying less. The Gourdon also doubles as my laptop carrier of choice when commuting, never had a drop of water get in. Anyone twigged I like Alpkit gear? :-)

  32. #32

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    Not quite as accessible as a Duffel but I've had one of these for about 15 years of Regular use and it's still going strong.

    https://www.seallinegear.com/ie/baja-dry-bag-0

    It's a snug Fit under my canoe seat and provides extra flotation in this place when strapped to the seat.

    Used to throw it in the water for a Man Overboard practice when I worked as a sailing instructor.

    A couple of these makes 60l and put a lot of soft thing is no less good for bulky items.

    I also used to alpkit good and rucksack for my laptop when cycling ( laptop in towel jumper). Never got wet so far but wouldn't trust it to be completely waterproof when canoeing.

    Ewan

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  33. #33
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    I use a lomo 60 l holdall and paddle mainly WW, may have had the odd damp trickle but never had any wet kit from it. more recently I double bag anything that is essential to stay bone dry ( just In case). actually this is quite a small amount in reality, sleeping bag and clothes and some food
    nature is m X-box

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