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Thread: How do I stay dry?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    East Calder, Scotland
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    Default How do I stay dry?

    Fairly new to canoeing and having an Old Town 158 I decided to also buy an Old Town 119 single seater. However, on a beautiful sunny day yesterday I took it out on our local canal and, after using a twin paddle for the first time, the only way I could have got any wetter would have been by falling in Can anyone give me tips on using the twin paddle as it was a rather funny sight on a hot sunny day to see a very wet paddler in a canoe . It was a little windy and trying to use a single paddle into the wind wasn't working. I have been practising my J stroke but don't feel as though I get enough forward momentum. When you all stop laughing any paddling tips in a single seater (with twin paddle) would be gratefully received.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    swingrate is a the to wortk in and your exit. begine well forward. pull untill the blades reaches your knee. slice your paddle out.

    use a singe blade, it will always be drier. keep it quiete. get en good cahtc so that your blade is fixed into the water. drive the boat forward , when you reache your knee . realse the power let it flor to your hips to get teh balde paralel to the centreline of your canoe. and vertical in the other plane(?). gie a small push and slice out.
    ps welcome and have fun
    Propper writing in English. How do you do that? with dyslexia, bad hand eye coordination, ect. and in a foreign language.
    Sorry for all the mistakes.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2007
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    Southern Oregon
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    Double bladed paddles are wet to use. It helps to have drip rings on the shaft and take short wide strokes. As the water begins to drip toward the hull you lower the raised blade and start a stroke on the other side. If the wind is too high you are going to get wet as the wind will blow the water drips in your face. You may want to experiment with different kayak paddles as some are better than others at keeping you dry. This is the reason I prefer the single blade most of the time. However when in a high wind or big rapids I am willing to give up being dry for the 1/3 more power I can produce with 2 blades. There is no laughing as we all start as beginners.

    The single bladed forward stroke can usually be improved with good body mechanics. When you paddle forward think about trying to propel the boat with your entire body. You need to transfer the force put on the water to the canoe. If kneeling think about pushing your knee forward on the canoe with your paddle. Rotate your body to use the core muscles. The dragon boat racers are only concerned about speed they exaggerate body rotation for this sprint. It is worthwhile to see how the racers do it.
    Dr. Joe
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Bucks
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    It is one of the problems of the 119 that it doesn't 'coast' well since being so short it struggles with maintaining momentum. Lennart has given you some useful pointers on using your paddles but I guess you will get on better with the single blade in the longer 158. You should practice your J stroke in the longer boat until you have more fluency and will be able to transfer this skill to the short boat. Certainly you will find the J stroke does not work well if the boat returns to stationary after the initial propulsion.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Maine
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    Double blade.. use a long enough shaft so that you can use a low angle stroke. That allows your top hand never to rise above your nose and keeps drops outside the boat. Drip rings are a valuable aid.

    Kayaking experience is helpful I have been kayaking for a very long time before solo canoeing and I never, except when the wind is up throwing water off the paddle gotten a bath of heroic proportions.

    The OT 119 is not a great wind boat due to its stubbiness. But don't give up. Practice double and single blading both.. Just as you should end the power part of your single blade stroke forward of your knees as Lennart said so should you with the double blade.

    Another issue is that if you are paddling seated, which I presume you are, you really need foot pegs to push off of or a foot bar.. Otherwise too much energy is wasted as each stroke wants to pull your bum forward off the seat and the harder you paddle the harder you fight to stay back on the seat.

    Single or double if you are seated you need something to push off of with your feet and legs.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    East Calder, Scotland
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    Thanks for all the advice guys, some useful tips and information that I can work with including the fact that the OT119 does not 'coast' very well. Perhaps my expectations were too high. Still love quietly drifting along in a canoe, great way to travel.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    SE London
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    It was a little windy and trying to use a single paddle into the wind wasn't working.
    Have you looked into how to trim your canoe to best deal with changing conditions? It makes a huge difference.

  8. #8
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    Kidderminster, North Worcestershire
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    It helps to put some weight towards the front of the canoe when paddling into the wind to trim the canoe bow heavy. To stop it swinging around. You can do this by either sitting further forward, or by putting a bag in the bows.

    Or if really windy, finding somewhere to paddle out of the wind.

  9. #9
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    Try using the canoe paddle as much as you can.. You can always carry the kayak paddle for backup.. I do on open water. Saying that I haven't used it for years. I also have the advantage on paddling a heavy long boat which holds its line better than the OT 119. ..you'll crack the technique with practice.

    Ironically I often use a single paddle in my fishing kayak (as well as the trad yak paddle) ..to move more quietly when the fish are about .. I've tried in a fresh wind and did quite well !.. My kayak does have a channelled hull which helps alot with tracking.

    Like the guys above suggest.. Trim is crucial, how you position yourself in the boat and that boat to the wind , you can get away with very little stroke correction sometimes..so all your energy is directed at where you want to get to.. When I'm on a large breezy body of water paddling a canoe is sometimes more akin to sailing!

  10. #10
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    May 2014
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    East Calder, Scotland
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    Thanks for this - really useful link and plenty to think about

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Rugeley Staffs
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    I sometimes use a double paddle and yes you do get soaked, so what I do is to cable tie a piece of catapult elastic or silicon tube at each end, around the shaft as far apart as is possible which acts as a splash/drip ring. Dos'nt work 100% but does help
    Hind sight is always 20/20

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