Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Outfitting an inflatable kayak (Sevylor Pointer K2) Part 1

  1. #1

    Default Outfitting an inflatable kayak (Sevylor Pointer K2) Part 1

    My wife and I have paddled both canoes and kayaks on and off on various holidays over the years but until recent retirement have not owned our own boat. Issues with storage and transportation meant that a hard shell was not possible and so we started looking for an inflatable.

    We had a great deal of help from our local shop (Robin Hood Watersports) who put us together an excellent package based around a Sevylor K2 Pointer. Although, as expected, the kayak has its limitations in terms of robustness and performance, it has enabled us to get out on the water and explore beautiful places at a relaxing pace.

    A great deal of enjoyment has been had in adapting the boat to suit our particular needs. Many of the ideas have been gleaned from earlier SOTP postings – thank you.

    I thought it might be useful to gather them all into one place for future reference.







    Alan

    To be continued (hopefully!)




    Seat backs



    The seats supplied have quite a soft back which often seemed to get bent when getting into the kayak. Off cuts of ABS, cut to shape using a cardboard template, are then held in place by the elastic netting already present on the seat back. This gives a much stiffer back which does not get deformed. A small loop of nylon line secures the stiffener to the top of the seat.
    There are limited points to attach items such as water bottles to the kayak as it stands. This can be remedied by feeding a piece of cycle inner tube complete with a stainless steel O ring over the main seat straps resulting in an attachment point close at hand


    Seat support











    My wife requires rather more support in the small of her back and so a piece of closed cell foam was cut off from a swimming aid (noodle), spilt lengthways and then fixed onto a piece of ABS with zip ties. It is not attached to the seat itself to can easily be adjusted for maximum comfort

    Rear arch


    The front deck of the kayak is supported by the original ABS arch. As the rear decking seemed to sag and allow water to pool an additional arch was made. The ABS off cut needed cutting into two pieces and fixing with pop rivets.






    Deck line and rings


    One potential downside of this particular model is that it does not have as many attachment points on the hull as I would like. This has been partially solved by running a deck line down each side which has stainless steel O rings knotted in place at convenient points. This can also act as an additional grab line as it is secured to the fore and aft carrying handles.




    Air bag & foot rest

    As the rear paddler I can often brace my feet against the back of the front seat but there is nothing for the front paddler to use. This was rectified by purchasing a 12 litre air bag and two gardeners’ foam kneeling pads. This latter were each cut in two and the whole bundle tied together. The bag and pads are simply pushed into the forepeak and provide sufficient bracing for normal use.




    Mooring stake and guard

    Often on the water where we paddle there are no mooring rings and the banks are too high to lift out the boat easily. A dog tethering screw suitably protected, when in the kayak, by a tight fitting plastic tube provides a solution.






    Mooring lines

    Two mooring lines have been added, clipped in to the fore and aft handles. To avoid having these loose in the boat they are stored in the net bags provided originally as bottle holders. An additional bag had to be purchased as only one was came as standard.







    C Tug Trolley


    After a couple of lengthy carries from a car park to the put in spot a C Tug trolley was purchased. It had proved an excellent investment and can easily be carried on the kayak if necessary. The wheels, pads and kick stand will pass through the rear hatch whilst the main frame pieces can be stored under the
    elastics on the foredeck.





    Single paddle



    For use only when the kayak is paddled as a solo a cheap single paddle was purchased as “get you home” item. Since the photo was taken the handle end has been changed for a T piece (Palm) which has proved more useful as an occasional boat hook.




    T handles – storage loops



    In order to give maximum maneuverability when paddling in narrow waterways the double ended paddles are split and an extension fitted on the end. The T handles are
    from Palm and the aluminum tube from eBay. A stainless steel self taping screw (not showing in the photo secures the T piece and prevents it twisting). By making them yourself you can ensure they are the correct length for different height paddlers. When not in use they live under the elastic straps on deck secured by a couple of knotted loops.








    Paddle bag



    This was a cheap item from a discount store whose original purpose was a cover for a garden rotary drier.





    Zip loops



    There are numerous zips on the kayak itself and associated bags and I find some of the zips difficult to manage with cold and wet fingers. A length of bright yellow nylon guy line threaded through each zip slider not only makes them easier to grasp but also much more visible.





    Clips


    The various plastic clips can be difficult to undo. Where possible they have been replaced with stainless steel snap links from a yacht chandlers





    Dry bag and BDH

    The stern storage area is surprisingly capacious and dry bag for spare clothes and a BDH for food fit in easily. Having the additional arch as noted above does help to increase the capacity here.



    Foot Pump

    For topping up the pressure during the day (rarely necessary) I carry a small foot pump. The connection tube seemed very susceptible to damage so it has been replaced by a length of wire reinforced tubing, sold as waste-pipe for caravan sinks. It is secured with a couple of stainless steel Jubilee clips.





    Bailer and sponge

    Having read that inflatables can be wet to paddle an early purchase was a baler and large sponge. Fortunately these have rarely proved necessary.





    Spare skeg

    The skeg as provided really does help with straight line tracking but seems venerable to damage or loss. A spare can be made by using a hacksaw on a cheap cutting board with the original as a template.





    Bow protection

    Landing on shingle beaches and concrete slipways etc seemed to have scrapped a couple of minor areas on the bow so a layer of Aquasure has been use to protect this slightly vulnerable area from any further damage.





    Map Case

    This is probably over kill but I have always enjoyed maps and navigation issues. A waterproof map bag (Ortlieb) is contains a piece of corrugated card as used for noticeboards and For Sale signs and is clipped on to the deck lines behind the front seat. A small compass and cheap digital watch and held in place inside the bag with double sided tape.




    Name & Logo

    These last two additions are really just a bit of vanity! The letters for the boats name came from an internet supplier for yacht names and the logo, a map of Arran were we spend holidays, is cut from a sheet of neoprene and glued on with Aquasure. The dot at the southern end is not a dirty mark but the island of Pladda!



    Last edited by MagiKelly; 1st-May-2014 at 01:31 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    St. Helens
    Posts
    468

    Default

    Great Write up Alan!
    Looks like you have done a proper job making improvments to the inflatable!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    17,475

    Default

    Very useful. I've merged your posts into one as it made it easier to promote to an article on the main site
    John

  4. #4
    Crow's Avatar
    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    16,117

    Default

    This is great!

    Some really good ideas there.

    Like it.

    Here comes the future and you can't run from it
    If you've got a blacklist I want to be on it


    Crow Trip Log

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,605

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    This is great!

    Some really good ideas there.

    Like it.
    What he said! Good stuff, well thought out, and well portrayed. Thanks for sharing.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  6. #6

    Default

    Hi there, do you think pointer is good enough for the sea? I am fresh in the sport and found one very cheap here in Greece and I was wondering if it worth starting with it! Thanks

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ysaek21 View Post
    Hi there, do you think pointer is good enough for the sea? I am fresh in the sport and found one very cheap here in Greece and I was wondering if it worth starting with it! Thanks
    This is not an easy one to answer as only you can make the judgement call at the time depending on the conditions and your experience, size of party etc.

    I will say that we have used our Pointer on the sea off the Isle of Arran a number of times over the years. The deciding factor is generally the wind and we look for no more than a Force 2 or 3. In general if there are any white tops to the waves we go and do something different for the day.

    The other issue is that we do not go far out from the shoreline and keep an eye out for places where we can make a quick exit if needed.

    The boat itself will handle the conditions but as wind (and hence waves) increase it becomes harder and harder to keep it tracking in the desired direction and also to make a reasonable speed through the water.

    I hope this helps. Others with more experience may have different views.

    Alan

  8. #8

    Default

    This is very helpful Alan, thank you!
    I got the same feeling, that if I see the white tops on the waves is probably wise to enjoy a good book!



    Quote Originally Posted by awparker View Post
    This is not an easy one to answer as only you can make the judgement call at the time depending on the conditions and your experience, size of party etc.

    I will say that we have used our Pointer on the sea off the Isle of Arran a number of times over the years. The deciding factor is generally the wind and we look for no more than a Force 2 or 3. In general if there are any white tops to the waves we go and do something different for the day.

    The other issue is that we do not go far out from the shoreline and keep an eye out for places where we can make a quick exit if needed.

    The boat itself will handle the conditions but as wind (and hence waves) increase it becomes harder and harder to keep it tracking in the desired direction and also to make a reasonable speed through the water.

    I hope this helps. Others with more experience may have different views.

    Alan

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks to all for the various comments regarding the photos etc.

    One matter I forgot to include relates to a modification to the wheels on the C Tug trolley and may apply to other similar wheels.

    The valve stems on the inner tubes are very short and quite difficult to connect to a pump. I fitted "angle valve extenders" available on ebay and often used on motor cycles. These are not very clear on the photo in the original post but really do make life much easier.

    Alan

  10. #10

    Default very helpfull post

    im going to buy one of these kaiaks this week, an i found very usefull information in this post, tank u very much, i hope u keep posting more info about.!

  11. #11

    Default

    Peter

    Thank you for your comments.

    You perhaps should be aware that the current 2014 version of the Sevylor (orange hull) is different from the one I described (yellow hull). I have only seen the adverts but apart from the colour change the new models have a couple of extra handles midway on the hull and some form of foot rest. What would have been a major issue for us is the lack of a rear hatch to access the useful storage area behind the rear seat. This would seem to prevent getting important items (like lunch!) out whilst actually in the boat.

    I think the older versions are still on sale via ebay but perhaps not for much longer.

    If I can help any further please let me know.

    Alan

  12. #12

    Default tanx for the attention

    Dear Allan
    Unfortunally i already bought the old version, secound hand...used for like 2 months, for a very, very cheap price...and as i live in Brazil, those models are not so easy to find here, just the hard ones, and i want a inflatable. The one i got is a green and light grey one. Here kayak paddling is not very usual. The sport of the moment is the Stand up paddle.
    Actually i dont have much experience either with kaiaks, but i must say... im in love. Preparing and gettting knowledge to do a expedition by the cost of Rio. so any token of experience is very welcome...sorry for my poor english

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by awparker View Post
    Thanks to all for the various comments regarding the photos etc.

    One matter I forgot to include relates to a modification to the wheels on the C Tug trolley and may apply to other similar wheels.

    The valve stems on the inner tubes are very short and quite difficult to connect to a pump. I fitted "angle valve extenders" available on ebay and often used on motor cycles. These are not very clear on the photo in the original post but really do make life much easier.

    Alan
    Hi I'm a new member, have you had any problems with the inflatable tubes bursting? A couple of reviews have mentioned it & I really like the look of the pointer2 for me as a solo with room for my wee dog. Thanks Brian

  14. #14

    Default Inflateable tubes

    Quote Originally Posted by Briant5 View Post
    Hi I'm a new member, have you had any problems with the inflatable tubes bursting? A couple of reviews have mentioned it & I really like the look of the pointer2 for me as a solo with room for my wee dog. Thanks Brian
    We have not had any problem with the tubes bursting though like you I had read reviews were this had been a problem. I have the manometer supplied by Sevylor with the boat and use that rather than the gauge on the pump to measure the correct pressure (1.5 psi on the sides, 1 psi on the floor). In practice I now very slightly over inflate before launching and then find that the cold water brings the pressure down to the above figures. I carry a small spare pump (see original posts) but rarely have to top up.

    Last time out for the first occasion in 5 yrs we had a pinhole puncture in the floor bladder near the valve. I have no idea what caused it as I am very careful to clean out any sand or grit after use. A blob of Aquasure (expensive but effective when compared with the glue and patches provided with the boat). The biggest issue was remembering to tie a pull cord onto the end of the bladder before removing it so that it could be helped back into place after repair. In a previous job a colleague forgot to do this with a telephone cable and a very long length of trench had to be re-dug. Oops!

    As a precaution I now have slipped in some addition pieces of rubber mat to cover the exposed floor bladder at the very fore and aft parts of the boat. A suitable source of cheap material was found using car floor mats from Wilko of similar. Pictures to follow.

    Enjoy your boat.

    Alan

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,794

    Default

    Another great addition would be some additional D rings for extra fittings.

    http://www.theboatswain.co.uk/forum/....php?f=10&t=26
    In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Duct tape fixes everything

  16. #16

    Default

    Thanks for all the information & loved your post with all the top tips, think I'm going to go for the same model. Thanks again Brian

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    wakefield
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Brilliant ��, off to buy one ��

  18. #18

    Default Sevylor Pointer - new model

    Quote Originally Posted by syncrostan View Post
    Brilliant ��, off to buy one ��
    Thank you for your comment.

    Just be aware that in 2014 Sevylor changed the design of the Pointer. Apart from the change of colour from yellow to orange and some other minor issues the boat no longer has a hatch in the rear deck giving easy access to storage behind the rear seat. A great shame I feel.

    The older versions occasionally come up on ebay.

    Alan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •