Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Sailing (ducks for cover)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    saltaire, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    250

    Default Sailing (ducks for cover)

    Having done my knee in at work i suspect that I will not be doing any prolonged kneeling for a while. Did it six weeks ago and after a bit of bog hopping for work in Ireland last week it is a bad as ever.

    Spent the last week doing a bad Mad Max impression, walking across bog with near waist high tussocks turned my knee tendons from being "aggravated" to "incandescent with rage"! (polite version for family site)

    So paddling is out for the time being, polling while better will also not do it any good. And the summer is coming up. Few choices, Kayak, Dingy sailing or fit my 15' explorer out for solo sailing.

    There are pros and cons with all of these

    1) don't have a dingy - and nowhere to store it.
    2) don't have a kayak (except a horrible inflatable thing) and nowhere to store it. What I would love is a klepper but can't justify the money!

    3) I have a canoe! But do I really want to reconfigure to sail? As far as I can see the mast seat needs to go right where front seat is at present and although it has never really been paddled as anything other than a solo - do I really want to shift stuff around?

    or do I bite the bullet and configure it around solo paddling/polling/single sail. Anyone got any thoughts or experience?

    One problem at the moment is that currently I paddle it back to front solo (as you would all expect) The ideal would be to both paddle and sail it from the same direction and have a removable seat/kneeling thwart that can be cleared out of way for polling. You could not reverse this without the mast step being in the way.

    My boat is a pig in the wind so I do quite like the idea of an alternative + can't help feeling there is not going to be a lot of water in the rivers this summer - as everything is pretty low now!

    Also are there any other kit people other than Solway Dory? I want more than just a down wind sail but get the feeling that their solutions may compromise paddling aspects - especially for WW.

    thoughts please...

    Rob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    3,753
    Journal Entries
    40

    Default

    www.canoegear.com has a complete sail kit - everything clamp-on. Spendy though. Don't imagine the shipping would come cheap either. Take a look at their stuff - might give you some ideas.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,195

    Default Sailing vs WW

    Rob
    The bits of kit that you would need to add to your boat to make it sail really well do not have to compromise its white water capabilities - most can be clamp/bolt on. My boat is a MRC Explorer 16rx and the only non-removable thing fitted for sailing is a wooden mast socket bonded to the bottom. Everything else is bolt or strap on. There are some pics that may help you on the Open Canoe Sailing Group website - link in my sig below. You can see mine here - although the pic is a few years old and the canoe/rig has had a few changes - such as more buoyancy and rudder/tiller mods. And you don't have to use a rudder - you can use a paddle and just stern rudder all day if you want to - it's just a bit trickier and fairly wearing as well. Let me know if you want any specific Qs answered...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    3,753
    Journal Entries
    40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windorpaddle View Post

    Keith:

    Where'd you get that great looking strap on rudder?

    PG
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Pierre
    Actually I made it - the cowl bit that fits on the stem of the canoe is polyester resinglass laid up on the canoe, which was well covered with release wax. Once cured it was popped off, trimmed and tidied up, a section of marine ply added to mount the pivots on (pintles and gugeons if you want get all technical!) The rudder stock and blade are also marine ply and were custom made by me along the lines of many dinghy rudders but smaller. There is a length of shockcord to pull the blade down in use - but it allows it to bounce up if you hit something - with an uphaul line for coming into shallow water or if you want to paddle. It is all finished off with good quality gloss paint which I had mixed up to match the hull colour as closely as possible (I took the canoe to a local paint specialist and chose the best match from their colour swatches). The metalwork I made from brass strip and stainless bolts/self tappers.
    The picture is a few years old and I have since changed the blade to a plastic one made from a windsurfer dagger board that was going in the skip (dumpster to you?) - it's a longer and therefore deeper profile with nil maintenance - and I have changed the double cord control lines, which were a bit vague, to a single wooden push-pull rod, which is much more positive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    3,753
    Journal Entries
    40

    Default

    Looks like a great job - and (unfortunately) more time involved than I have. Darn!
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Glasgowish
    Posts
    1,416
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Hi Rob,

    I'm afraid I can't hold a candle to Keith's set-up, but I did lash something together quickly for my Caledonian Canal trip - and it worked really well.

    For the time being I have installed a mast thwart and clamped the mast to the front seat as well, instead of using a mast step. This gave perfectly adequate strength for a small rig. If you want to sail backwards , maybe this could be fitted on the stern seat?



    The sail itself was lashed together in an evening from old spinnaker nylon I had left over from my kite-making days. The moose was Mrs Blutack's idea, and the purple patch is where I messed up, and sewed the sprit attachment in the wrong place .



    The lee-board simply fits through some loops of rope attached to the lacing from the inside. These are loose enough to slide the board through horizontally, but tighten up when the board is vertical. You do have to change sides with the lee-board, but that's not really much hassle. It also tends to float up when going downwind, but you don't need it then anyway!

    This is the only photo I have of the lee-board. I have also carefully marked one side 'fish', and the other 'vegetables' to comply with food hygiene regs .



    The mast is an Endless River split canoe pole, which cost 55, meaning the total cost of the rig to me was about, er 58, since I had to buy some wing nuts and a plastic buckle!

    Basically, don't hold back - it's great fun, and if you don't like it, everything is removable!



    Cheers,

    Blutack.
    Last edited by Blutack; 18th-May-2007 at 09:53 PM.
    The Canoeist's prayer: "Lord grant me the serenity to walk the portages I must, The courage to run the rapids I can, And the wisdom to know the difference".

    John Muir Trust - Wild Places for Nature & People.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •