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Thread: Creating a rubbing strip on my Hull

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    London
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    Default Creating a rubbing strip on my Hull

    I'm about to put a rubbing strip on the hull; my canoe has seen a lot of action and the gel coat has been worn away just at the bow. I have brought some graphite powder to mix with fibreglass epoxy resin to create a more resistant strip, It seems you mix in about 10% graphite powder to the mix. I intend to rub done the gel coat to the cloth layer underneath, clean with acetone and then apply the graphite/ fibreglass mix.

    Does that sound right? any tips?




  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Perthshire
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    Default

    if you are looking to apply a rubbing strip to a grp canoe, the method used to add keel-strips to composite sea kayaks is a tried and tested way of adding this protection. this is one of the best guides there is....http://www.seakayakermag.com/2004/Oct04/KeelStrip01.htm

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    near Newcastle
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    Default

    Have you thought about using keeleazy?:



    I've applied a meter on either end of my boat, rather than mess about with epoxy etc.


    It seems to be doing the job quite well although I don't intentionally run up anything particularly heavily and the tape is only about 1mm thick in total. It doesn't or rather didn't go on quite as nicely as it does on the glass fibre kayaks in the videos but it looks and works okay so far.

    The thing is, if it wears too quickly or whatever, it's only cost me 20.60 including postage and a bit of a hairy scary time with the heat gun in the garage, and it can be (apparently) removed by re-heating and peeling off, (again-apparently) leaving no trace

    We shall, perhaps see!

    good luck

    Steve


    Now paddling Either a Gumotex Palava 400 Or a Gumotex Solar Pro 410c and LOVING IT!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    south Cumbria
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    1,206

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    I've used epoxy graphite on the wear areas at each end of my royalex canoe - with the help of Dave S. Your game plan sounds good to me. Getting the right consistency is the key - flowing enough to settle to a smooth finish, but not so runny that it runs everywhere!

    I masked off the areas to keep it neat and tidy. Epoxy is a bu**er for running where you don't want it to go. Take the masking off before the epoxy gets rock hard...

    The stick on tape mentioned above is also good and I may well have used it if I had been aware of it. Solway Dory are using it to finish the joint area of their new canoe Evolution.

  5. #5

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    I would use like for like materials...Loads of advice on the west system website..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    5,063

    Default

    Anything wrong with good old-fashioned bang-plates?





  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    I've rolled on a mixture of West 105/205 epoxy and West graphite powder to re-cover a polyester/nylon/vinylester resin boat that had become fuzzy from wear. The graphite/epoxy doesn't level well, so final sanding was necessary, but for a small stem repair that's no problem. The epoxy and graphite seems hard, but the boat has not been used enough to say whether the recoat job will stick to the old hull surface.

    The epoxy/graphite stuff is worth trying for your canoe, which (by my standards) has not been heavily used. It will add minimal weight and thickness to the boat.

    When I had to repair more serious damage to the bow and stern stems of an Old Town Tripper, I used several concentric layers of fiberglass and epoxy (and one layer of Kevlar under everything else). This is a bit technical to do, and I would not suggest it except to those who are serious about getting into "glass" boat patching. But this sort of "skid plate" results in a high level of strength, high frictional wear resistance, low thickness, low drag, no tendency to fuzz, and easiest repairability.

    As for Kevlar felt skid plates, clearly they are a market success. Many are happy with them. I will only observe that no quality boat was ever made entirely of glass mat or Kevlar felt, and so why would a quality patch be made with it? ((Because it's easier to slap on, with fewer steps, and "Kevlar" sounds nice.))

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
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    I too used Keeleazy on my Royalex canoe (just a strip on the bow and stern) and it's worked well as a rubbing strip (but probably wouldn't be up to white water use). I was so impressed with it that I fitted a full length strip to my GRP Shearwater when it was new. It wasn't as easy to apply to the finer ends of the glassfibre boat but it has already done it's job when I hit a rock last autumn (it made a hole in the Keeleazy but left the gelcoat intact. It is expensive though and I reckon it will need reapplying every couple of years.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2011
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    Washington State, USA, shores of Puget Sound
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    Somewhat similar to Ezwater, I have repaired an Old Town Tripper ( two, in fact ) using glass and epoxy only. Some of you may be aware that I use this method for constructing the mast steps for my sail rigs. It is brutally strong in this function. So, I see no reason why an armor skin will not work as a skid plate. The nice thing is that you can abrade the area to be covered and then lay on the glass dry, taping it to slightly stretch over the hull. This allows a better control over possible runs when applying the goop. There does not seem to be a downside, as there is minimal weight gain or raised area, and, a diligent sanding produces a very smooth finish, suitable for paint or a clear coat.

    Another advantage is that while a canoe takes it hard on the stem, other adjacent areas are also frequently damaged, as illustrated in the OP's pics. I just cut the glass to an arrowhead shape and cover the entire chin. I would guess that total weight gain is about a pound, since only one layer is usually needed, although I added a 100mm wide strip along the actual ridge of the stem ( on the outside so it could be sanded flush ).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Might be worth adding a word about bias cutting of glass cloth to get it to conform to stems.

    If the glass to be added is very narrow, it may be best to cut it "straight" so that the fibers either lie along the keel, or are at 90 degrees to it.

    But if a wider, more "serious" skid plate is needed, bias cutting will make it fairly easy to get the glass to adjust to the convexity of the stem. Bias cutting means that the scissors follow a line at 45 degrees to the glass fibers. And the resulting patch will go on the stem so that *all* of the fibers are at about a 45 degree angle to the keel axis.

    Because (unlike OutnBacker) I use 3 or more layers of glass when patching, I first clean and sand the target area, and then using a cheap disposable brush, I paint some epoxy on the zone being patched. Then with my gloved hands, I place the first, largest, bias cut piece onto the epoxy, and using a popsickle stick or the aforementioned brush, I gently coax the glass patch to lie down and soak into the epoxy. A bit more epoxy may be needed.

    The next patch is roughly concentric, a little smaller, and also bias cut. Rather than laying it down so the glass fibers are exactly parallel to the first patch, I deliberately place it down at a slight angle. It is desirable *not* to have the fibers of succeeding patches exactly parallel, to avoid any tendency to fracture along fiber lines. The second (concentric) patch will be happy to lie down on the first and soak up resin as it does so. Little resin need be added.

    Then a third bias cut, concentric patch, nudging the fiber direction the other way to avoid stress lines. If the day is warm, one must work smoothly so the epoxy does not "go off". It is more likely to set in the mixing cup than in the glass. Sometimes I mix the epoxy and then split it into two cups or a shallow tray to keep the heat of its setting from hardening it too soon.

    When the layers are sitting nicely, I put a piece of thin plastic food wrap over them and tighten it down with short strips of tape at its margins. I may use my thumb to work excess resin and air out of the glass cloth, toward the margins of the cover plastic. After the epoxy sets, the patch will be fairly smooth. Finger sanding of the margins of the successively smaller concentric patches will smooth the result further.

    People often ask, why not patch from smallest to largest, rather than largest to smallest? Just trust me on this. Largest to smallest is a bit stronger.

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