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Thread: Gumotex Palava

  1. #61
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    Simon, where abouts are you based? i have one you can try out

  2. #62

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    Hi all.
    I just bought a Gumotex Palva 400 based on input in this thread. Should I start a new thread named "Gumotex Palava 400" with thoughts and feedback to separate it from the older Gumotex Palva model or do you guys prefer to keep it all in this thread?

  3. #63

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    hi,

    i also recently bought a palava 400, can't wait to use it, because it looks great! i ordered it at yachtershop.sk in slovakia: about 550 euro
    and free shipping!
    i guess it's a good idea to start a new thread

  4. #64

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    I don't have permission to start a new thread (which might make sense ha ha ha) and it seems like the forum prefer to keep the discussion on the new version of the palava in this thread.

  5. #65

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    So today I tried the Gumotex Palava 400 in a canal here in London.

    I have a limited paddling experience from an inflatable double hull kayak (Chinook Tandem XL) that was bought last summer.

    I decided to paddle it as an canoe with the help of the j stroke. Took me around 15 min to get the stroke working as in canoe going forward in walking pace. I do the stroke better on my left-hand side compared to the right-handed. Obviously there is room for tuning my technique....

    I could sit both in the middle of the canoe and in the stern. With wind I feel easier to sit in the middle of the canoe. When sitting in the middle I tend to sit close (tilt) to the side where I paddle.

    Tracking wise the boat was OK, but I feel confident that with more experience the tracking will improve. My kayak have detachable a skeg that helps with tracking.
    I have a a skeg to the Palava that I have not yet attached. I plan to wait a bit before attaching it and see how it goes with that J stroke of mine....

    It felt very stable albeit it balances a bit different from my inflatable kayak that have a lower seating position. I could easily move from stern to bow when in water.

    Fairly easy to portage over locks as well, just to carry over shoulder.

    I absolutely love the Palava and am very happy I decided to upgrade. I feel that there is much more to learn in terms of paddling techniques, and I am looking forward spending more time on the water.

    If anyone in the London area are curious about the Gumotex Palava 400, don't hesitate to contact me and we possibly could meet up so the canoe can be tested.

    I bought the Palava at Soley Marine after talking a lot to them both over mail and phone. They where extremely helpful and gave me heaps of advice during the buying process.

  6. #66

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    https://www.flickr.com/gp/2_dogs/526356
    A 2 min clip of me paddling. Just to illustrate the tracking for an absolute beginner with the J-stroke.
    Last edited by 2dogs; 25th-February-2016 at 11:24 PM. Reason: Typo

  7. #67
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    Congrats on your new canoe. Sounds like you're loving it!

    As you say, sitting centrally helps with trim in wind, and if its a strong headwind, even moving slightly forward of the middle can help.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  8. #68

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    Thanks for the tips. I am also thinking of carrying 2 of those collapseable watercontainers for trimming the boat when paddling solo. They can be filled up with water and placed in canoe. Maybe overkill with an inflatable though. It is obvious how high on the water it is and I imagine a "proper" canoe would be amazing to paddle (will try for sure).

    I love going out in the morning paddle for a few good hours on the waterways of London and then fold up canoe and take public transport home.

  9. #69

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    Heh in an inftable you do not have to worry about sinking



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  10. #70

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    Ha ha ha.... Well I don't know about that... Got a puncture on my old inflatable kayak that have nylon hull and PVC bladders..Followed that English idea about "keep calm and carry on". Got kayak repaired and then bought the Palava...

  11. #71

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    Seriously though on our Loch Lomond trips we have had
    Leaking kayaks gradually sinking and the inflatables coming to the rescue.


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  12. #72

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    That's impressive...i got the puncture on the side of the bladder when getting on contact with a small metal object in the side of a towpath so was rather unlucky. Interesting with an inflatable on Loch Lomond. How did it act in wind?

  13. #73

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    Never had any problems in the wind. Just adopt the same strategies you would in any open canoe for example sit nearer the front going into a headwind.
    I find some sea kayaks tend to weathercock more with strong winds.


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  14. #74

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    I've had issues with a couple of the valves on mine. Anyone else experienced this?

  15. #75

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    On a gumotex? A couple of times I've had a bit of sand get in them which takes a bit of gentle twisting to free up but not really issues as such (mine are the old bayonet valves rather than the current push-push ones). They're pretty easy to replace mind you - a new push-push valve is Ł14 from gumotex.co.uk and the wrench is a further Ł10

  16. #76

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    Yes, on a Gumtex Palava. I had one jam open within the first few weeks of ownership. I had to get a replacement and fit it with the wrench you mention. I find that the others also tend to stick regularly as well, but not completely jam.

  17. #77

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    That sounds pretty annoying. Presumably you use the valve covers to keep debris and stuff out, so the only thing I could think to try is silicon spray grease or somthing like that to lube the spring a bit

  18. #78

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    Yes - it's an annoying feature of what is otherwise a good product. To be fair, the supplier did replace the faulty valve for free though. For the other they suggested that I us silicon spray, but I haven't tried it yet.

  19. #79

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    Not had a problem yet, but the palava I have is rather new. I will look into silicon spray that you guys have mentioned. Maybe an idea to get it before the valves jams....

  20. #80
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    I tried my Palava on both flat (Canal) and moving water last weekend.

    My thoughts on this boat;-
    Flat water,
    It is slower than a conventional "hard shell" canoe, this is to be expected really. To put it into perspective, 1 paddle stroke for the prospector = 1 1/2 paddle strokes in the Palava to keep up.
    We did a 10 mile paddle on the Llangollen canal, 5 miles with the flow (yes there is a noticeable flow on this canal) and a headwind, the return journey against the flow with no problems.

    The following day however (starting to sound like a blogg, sorry) we paddled in the Palava's intended environment - moving water.

    Fantastic, really pleased with the boat, again a little sluggish acceleration and can be a little " directionally twitchy" when ferry gliding in a flow but not really too much of an issue.
    Took in a little water, no more than the Prospector but with a Palava watercan be easily tipped out

    Take a look and see for your self
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  21. #81

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    Wow! That looks amazing! Moving water will be on list for next summer. Keeping on the canals for this year...

  22. #82

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    Nice vid! If anyone else is thinking about a two-man gumotex which is going to be used a lot in whitewater, it might be worth checking out the Baraka. There's quite a good comparison piece here http://www.vodak-sport.cz/recenze/ba...oko-k2/?lang=1 that I've reproduced below (without the pictures)

    "Review of Baraka for the umpteen time

    A lot has been written about a self draining inflatable canoe made by Gumotex, still I am going to share my own experience with you.

    In Vodák sport we have one Baraka canoe lent for testing and demonstration until it gets into full production. Our club went to Slovak rivers last long weekend, so I took the Baraka.

    There was a good water level there, so we went down lots of rivers and creeks. On those quite little ones like Ráčkový creek, Boca or Štiavnica I paddled a kayak (my new Pyranha ReCoil), on bigger rivers like Černý Váh, Bílý Váh, Váh a Belá I paddled the Baraka. The easier rivers I went down with my children, the more difficult I paddled with my wife. So what was Baraka like?

    Its manoeuvrability was excellent both on white water with an active bowman and on calmer water in three with a weaker bowman. The third inflatable seat worked well. The third person held on to the boat thanks to the side ropes even in steeper rapids.

    Baraka?s speed is good, too. It?s really comfortable for shorter paddlers but I, being 190cm tall, would appreciate a slightly higher seat when kneeling. Sitting was comfy even for me. Width of kneeling is sufficient. During a long period kneeling a nut of the seat slightly hurt me on my paddling side but it was O.K. when sitting. If the nuts hinder you, they can be replaced in the old way by a rope.

    The thicker hull was very comfortable for knees. It absorbed impacts of stones well, so the knees didn?t suffer. I would kneel into this boat again although I haven?t done anything I should be punished for.

    Volume of the boat was excellent. I think we didn?t reach even a half of its maximum loading limit. In waves water didn?t splash over the bow but rather over its sides. It flew out rather quickly, although the draining could be a bit quicker. A draining sleeve can be easily sealed, which is great. The boat was absolutely dry on flat water.
    J

    Even the boat?s little gadgets are amazingly thought out, as for example bow and stern nets for sundry, an extending rope in both the bow and the stern or slings for a pump, a rescue bag and other things. Especially the rescue bag tied at hand is a very pleasant thing, unique in inflatable boats.

    My general impression of Baraka was very good. Of course there are some details that could match my needs better, however if the boat is designed for general public, then I cannot think about many changes. In any case you should try it out.


    Comparison with other Gumotex canoes.

    I don?t intentionally compare it with boats of other producers because such a comparison cannot be objective. It?s always burdened by personal favours for specific producers and boat features aren?t set objectively. Therefore I?m going to compare inflatable canoes made only by Gumotex. They are Pálava, Orinoco and K2 rebuilt into a canoe by adding seats from Orinoco.

    Baraka/Pálava

    The basic advantage of the new Baraka in comparison with Pálava is the self draining hull. Due to that running down a streamy river of higher grade is safe. Baraka?s speed, stiffness and stability are noticeably better than Pálava?s. Manoeuvrability of both is similar. On white water Baraka?s thicker hull protects knees better. Baraka bends less on drops than Pálava, it behaves rather like a solid boat. But its bow doesn?t sink even under the drops thanks to its volume. Wider kneeling in Baraka makes the boat more stable in rapids. Baraka?s advantages on flat water are a larger loading capacity and a lack of inflatable decks, which can blow out under the Sun. However, for largely quiet rivers with seldom easy rapids I would prefer Pálava, which is cheaper, shorter and lower, more wind resistant, lighter and more compact. For universal use in rapids and on flat water I would choose Baraka for its good features on flat water and excellent features on white water.

    Baraka/Orinoko

    Compared to Orinoko Baraka is faster and lighter. It is slightly less manoeuvrable than Orinoko, but that is compensated by its higher speed and lower weight. Orinoko is slightly stiffer and it drains through the draining sleeve faster. Passive stability of Orinoko is better than Baraka?s, but Baraka is even more stable in rapids than Orinoko. So I would prefer Orinoko for very difficult streamy rivers, while I would choose Baraka if I were going to paddle technical creeks as well as streamy and sometimes quieter rivers. In addition the price/output rate of Baraka is better, so my choice between Baraka and Orinoko is obvious.

    Baraka/K2 (rebuilt into a canoe)

    I have to admit that K2 has been my favourite among the canoes produced so far. It is the most versatile and the fastest canoe out of those mentioned above and it most resembles a solid boat. It?s a kind of sports boat, which is its disadvantage. Most paddlers on inflatable boats prefer their slower and steadier features. Moreover K2?s loading capacity is lower and its draining holes cannot be sealed, which is another disadvantage in comparison to Baraka. Due to the lateral draining holes K2 is totally unsuitable for calm rivers. These holes let the water out, but on flat water they allow the water to splash in, so the boat is never dry. I would choose K2 for a light experienced crew on white water. Otherwise I would certainly prefer Baraka."

  23. #83

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    Last saturday I paddled my Palava for the first time solo on the river Werse near Münster Germany. I decided to sit in the stern. Had some problems keeping a straight course... probably due to lack of experience. I would like to try to sit in the middle. Can I just place the bow seat in the middle or do I have to buy/make an extra seat?
    In spite of the course problems: paddling the palava was great and very stable. And the Werse is beautiful!

  24. #84
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    hi Bernadet,

    i own a gumotex palava and paddle it solo using a single blade canoe paddle. I have no problems keeping it in a straight line but it does take some practice - you will get better if you keep at it. I always sit in the stern but I try to balance the weight so the nose of my canoe is not poking out of the water too much. Put all bags / food / water to the bow end and see how that goes. have fun!

    Majid

  25. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernadet View Post
    Last saturday I paddled my Palava for the first time solo on the river Werse near Münster Germany. I decided to sit in the stern. Had some problems keeping a straight course...
    Hi Bernadet, try sitting/kneeling from the bow seat facing backwards (the bow seat is slightly closer to the middle than the stern seat) the stern then becomes the bow, does this make sense?
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  26. #86

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    Hi Majid and Tim,

    Thanks for your advise! I will combine both and keep practising....

  27. #87
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    This is how mine sits in the water, minimum kit and 14 stone of me

    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  28. #88

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    I have my seats in the stern and in the middle position. I keep food/drink/stuff in the bow. I tend to sit in the stern unless strong headwind, then I move to middle seat. Control of direction was a bit of a problem for me in the beginning. Especially starting the canoe. After a few outings it went a lot better and now I have no problem. Still have room to improve my skills with different strokes though....

    Thanks for the seating tip Tim! I will definitely try that out!

  29. #89
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    The more I paddle my Palava, the more I am impressed it, We spent a week at Hereford Rowing Club with the Canoe Camping Club here we were able to have a good old play in the water.

    First off it is now my preferred boat for rescues, very manoeuvrable and canoe X rescues are a breeze even if the other boat has no air bags...












    Self rescue in amongst the carnage




    Still concerned about stability?


    In my books this is a serious boat, not just a toy

    Although....canoe jousting is fun

    A picture speaks a thousand words s I hope this helps
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  30. #90

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    Well looks like I will be joining the palava club, getting an old style one second hand but at a price the other half can't complain about just need to replace a couple of patches, any advice on repairs?


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  31. #91

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    Does your boat come with the repair kit? New gumboats come with the kit (housed in a natty red plastic box) that includes patches, glue and a couple of spare valve pump adapters. Solely marine and Bluewater sports do replacements for Ł15-Ł20 and you can probably choose your colour to match your boat. The only thing is, the glue that comes in the repair kit isn't brilliant so if you want to do a repair that will last a lifetime, I'd use something like Bostik 2 part hypalon glue instead. Make sure you roughen the areas to be glued really well with sandpaper and then weight it down for a good few hours once you've stuck the patch on

  32. #92

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    Second that. Recently repaired an old style Twist 2. The initial repair with the Gumotex glue failed although the tube may have been opened for a while previously. Then used a fresh tube of Aquaseal with weights on it overnight. No problems since then.
    Good luck



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  33. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Inflator View Post
    Does your boat come with the repair kit? New gumboats come with the kit (housed in a natty red plastic box) that includes patches, glue and a couple of spare valve pump adapters. Solely marine and Bluewater sports do replacements for Ł15-Ł20 and you can probably choose your colour to match your boat. The only thing is, the glue that comes in the repair kit isn't brilliant so if you want to do a repair that will last a lifetime, I'd use something like Bostik 2 part hypalon glue instead. Make sure you roughen the areas to be glued really well with sandpaper and then weight it down for a good few hours once you've stuck the patch on
    Seller is going to send a repair kit with it will see what arrives when I get it, will make sure I use the glue you have advised, and may order a new repair kit if needs be to get a rough colour match.



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  34. #94

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    Well the palava has arrived, now to order some 2 part glue to redo the two patches, then just need a child free day to try it out.


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  35. #95
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    Hi as usual I do all the research into each and every thing, in this case Ally canoes and Pak boats, however, after watching the Dee trip in a Palava on you tube I thought ...that could be me...and then went and bought one from Rob at Solely Marine, some people have a lot to answer for.....We picked it up on the way to north Wales for WWSR training, with Chris Brain (top class coach by the way), Only got chance to wet the boat today, on a reservoir, tandem and solo with canoe and double blade kayak paddles (quite fast), stood up and paddled it but no headstands as yet, must work on the wifes confidence, or just not mention Serpents till its over. Early days but up to now very impressed even if she does call it the Lilo.

  36. #96
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    Anyone paddled the Palava tandem with any kit for any distance on flat and/or easy moving water? I'm thinking one adult max 5'11, 83kg, one medium sized child (9 or 6 currently) and one 110L pack for multidays.

    TIA

    Ade

  37. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    Anyone paddled the Palava tandem with any kit for any distance on flat and/or easy moving water? I'm thinking one adult max 5'11, 83kg, one medium sized child (9 or 6 currently) and one 110L pack for multidays.

    TIA

    Ade
    No, but having paddled Maj's version on the flat, I'd think that would be fine with your lightweight gear set up. You may need to split the 110L into a couple of other bags to make best use of the space, can't remember if the standard set positions had enough space between them to fit the big bag whilst leaving knee/leg room for the rear paddler. Maybe try and get a go in Maj's sometime?
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  38. #98
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    Cheers Mal, about time we got out locally...

  39. #99
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    Plenty of space, weighed ours up on water, tandem with 30Kg collie and still space for light weight camping gear. The gear would have to be spread out around the boat though.

  40. #100
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    Me and Mrs Tim took ours two up down the Tarn up to grd 3 (all be it an easy peasy one), no problem just a little wetter than one up. With some light weight gear and a little one up front, can't see a problem.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  41. #101
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    Thanks folks, useful info.

  42. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    Anyone paddled the Palava tandem with any kit for any distance on flat and/or easy moving water? I'm thinking one adult max 5'11, 83kg, one medium sized child (9 or 6 currently) and one 110L pack for multidays.

    TIA

    Ade
    I've only spent one day paddling mine tandem and that was with a complete novice who just can't understand that you need a lot more than brute strength to be able to paddle any canoe full stop.
    Sadly in spite of starting the day well with some decent distances covered in very straight lines, by afternoon we seemed to be spending lot of time Google ng in circles no matter what I did with trim etc. Frankly I think that while the Palava is an excellent boat solo, tandem its a bit of a hand full unless both paddlers know what they're doing. You may well get away with it if the other paddlers a child and not really contributing much to the propulsion.

    There really isn't a lot of space in the Palava for gear once you're two up but keeping your gear light and compact should solve that.

    Good luck regardless.

    Best wishes

    Steve


    Now paddling a Gumotex Palava 400 and LOVING IT! (I should have bought one years ago!!! )

  43. #103

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    Don't forget that you can retrofit the Gumotex fin to any of their boats. The patch and fin cost around Ł20 I think and the proper glue (not the stuff they give you) would be another Ł10 or so maybe. Certainly makes an enormous difference to tandem paddling in their kayaks so I'm guessing the same would be true of a boat like the Palava

  44. #104
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    Evening all. Can anyone confirm as to whether the older Palava versions with the inflatable tops at the stems and more cord along the sides are in any way 'less good' than the current new ones.

    edit.

    I've just found this:


    The new, innovative Palava 400 introduced in 2013. With a new sporty look and improved handling Bow and stern are revised and ensure a faster straight line speed. In addition, the newly revised Palava offers improved storage space for luggage and is significantly lighter than its predecessor. The seat boards of Gumotex Palava ensure a comfortable fit The leg straps allow secure knees when riding on rapids.
    Any thoughts on pre 2013 boats?
    TIA

    Ade

  45. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    Evening all. Can anyone confirm as to whether the older Palava versions with the inflatable tops at the stems and more cord along the sides are in any way 'less good' than the current new ones.

    edit.

    I've just found this:




    Any thoughts on pre 2013 boats?
    TIA

    Ade
    Erm, I doubt if the differences are significant.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  46. #106
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    Less good?

    Well they have to be heavier and they look a bit more "paddling pool" uncool but still better than any sevylor and most others of similar type for that matter


    I do like the idea of the full length strips with eyelets down the top of both side tubes, which I reckon might well come in handy for some of the more adventurous paddlers, doing more serious white water or maybe for a diy cover project or the mounting of a sail of some kind.

    I think the 400 looks a bit better but that's pretty subjective of course. This is mine;


    The end decks might shed water a little better in the rough stuff than the simple, single layer offerings of the 400.

    As I say, the 400 has got to be lighter without the extra material in the decks and the top strips but only a few pounds. It might well make it easier to pack too, I wouldn't know but the palava 400 packs away no bother to the size of a berghaus crusader Crusader-90-20-Rucksack-MMP

    I would be careful about buying an older boat, unless it's a daft price and you've seen it pumped up and checked it with soapy water for leaks.

    They're not cheap but I'd recommend these over the "competition" any day. I'm considering a baraka but will probably just buy another palava in order to entice family and friends to join me once I actually get going again in April

    You can do some really radical poopy with these things if you so choose mind you. (Honestly I love these things )


    Good luck

    Steve


    Now paddling a Gumotex Palava 400 and LOVING IT! (I should have bought one years ago!!! )

  47. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by rancid badger View Post
    Less good?


    I do like the idea of the full length strips with eyelets down the top of both side tubes, which I reckon might well come in handy for some of the more adventurous paddlers, doing more serious white water or maybe for a diy cover project or the mounting of a sail of some kind.

    Steve
    I'm not that keen on the strips with eyelets in and would avoid if possible, as I believe they can catch and irritate the bottom hand when paddling, imagine giving the paddle a bit of oomph then catching a nail on an eyelet ouch!
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  48. #108
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    Thanks Tim and RB.

    There's an older one on ebay at the moment. Also looking at packrafts now the min2 has gone and the cash is burning a hole in my pocket....

  49. #109
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    Packraft is a completely different animal to the palava.

    Nowhere near as efficient to paddle but okay weight wise.

    Only packraft I'd touch would have to be an alpacka of some sort, the rest seem to be a lot less durable.

    cheers

    Steve


    Now paddling a Gumotex Palava 400 and LOVING IT! (I should have bought one years ago!!! )

  50. #110
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    Can't comment on the packraft, I have never paddled one. They, have their merits and some people love 'em so they must be good.
    I guess you have to step back and look at what kind of usage you want the "new boat" for.

    My reasoning to buy our Palava was for it to fit in the back of our camper van, simply so we can lift the roof up without mauling boats on and off the roof while road tripping and still paddle one or two up. That and the price was favourable too.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  51. #111
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    Cheers Tim, I'm not entirely sure how we'll use the boat, my guess is for the odd local bimble and in my imagination for more adventurous multi-days with one of the boys. The fact I can haul the packed canoe overseas with us when we head out later this year is a bonus. I have a spring/summer tour of the UK planned in our camper van and looking at roof rack options was going to prove costly and impractical especially as we'll need to get shot of that later this year as well.. (the van is a hi-top and we'd need to cart a ladder around!). I'm drawn to the sub 5kg load and small packed size of the Packraft Gnu or MRS Adventurex2 which will do everything we need but at a bit more cost.

    My experience of lightweight camping kit suggests things have come on a bit in recent years and lightweight doesn't mean flimsy or not fit for purpose..

  52. #112
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    Well after a bit of dithering and some red wine for courage, a new Palava appears to have been acquired.. in faster red of course.

    I blame Tim and Steve

  53. #113
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    At least we didn't tell you how much fun they are in the sea.....

    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  54. #114
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    Well it got lugged around the Cairngorms, West Highlands and North Lakes and got inflated once on Ullswater. Do folk use a pressure gauge as I'm curious as to how much you need to inflate the thing to stop it creasing at the seat (I weigh 84kg currently)

    Also I found my knees closer together when kneeling than I'm used to, which made it feel disconcertingly unstable, which I'm certain it isn't.

    Aside from leaving it behind on the campsite for 4 hours before we realised... nice little unplanned round trip ensued... I guess it goes more or less as expected.

  55. #115

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    Yeah no padding for us far too windy in Loch Lyon.
    Luckily we did the Great Glen last Easter.
    My pump has a pressure gauge on it and think that gumotex boats can take far more pressure than stated. They always lose pressure when you put them in cold water anyway.


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  56. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    Well it got lugged around the Cairngorms, West Highlands and North Lakes and got inflated once on Ullswater. Do folk use a pressure gauge as I'm curious as to how much you need to inflate the thing to stop it creasing at the seat (I weigh 84kg currently)
    I bought a pump with a pressure gauge, I noted where the needle was when pumping up the floor and the pressure relief valve kicked in and pumped up the main tubes to the same.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    Also I found my knees closer together when kneeling than I'm used to, which made it feel disconcertingly unstable, which I'm certain it isn't.
    I felt that too, but it's something you do get used to. The more you play/mess with the boat the more your confidence grows in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    Aside from leaving it behind on the campsite for 4 hours before we realised... nice little unplanned round trip ensued... I guess it goes more or less as expected.
    oopsie
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  57. #117
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    Thanks guys, I gave it a top up after leaving on the water for a few mins based on my experience of owning a Sevylor Colorado. Was just wondering how much pressure you can get away with as it makes a big difference to solo paddling.

    Some pics - on reflection, its a keeper..



    The only way I can get both kids in a canoe these days.




    2up makes a big difference in speed and ease of movement (when he actually paddles)


    I'm liking the weight

  58. #118
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    It's some years now since I owned a Gumotex Safari, and I can't remember the recommended pressure figures. But I did read a piece of advice somewhere that it should be "hard, but not rock-hard." I pretty much went with that. However, be careful if the boat is in strong sunshine, doubly so if it's out of the water, triply so if you've inflated to more than recommended. Even British sunshine can heat the boat enough to significantly increase the pressure.
    Not in Oxford any more...

  59. #119
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    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  60. #120

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    Davy, from your pics it looks like you've got it pretty decently inflated. Gumotex recommend 3.0 psi for the palava and you'll notice that you have a pressure relief valve in the floor of the boat. As I understand it, the construction of the i-beam floor is such that over-pressuring it can result in failure of the glue inside that forms the i-beams, which essentially writes off the boat. You'll notice that it starts to hiss and release air when it gets to 3.0 ish psi. Chris from apaddleinmypack speculates (and I agree with him) that, if the comparatively sensitive i-beam floor can take 3.0 psi then the side tubes can probably handle a bit more. He has got a gumotex seawave that is rated to 3.75 psi which also comes with a pressure relief valve in the floor. What he has done is left the floor one as it is but then added two further pressure relief valves, one in each side tube, that are rated to 4.8 psi allowing him to 'over pressure' his tubes against the factory spec but with some peace of mind that he's not putting waaaay too much in them. It's a gamble, of course, but one you might be prepared to take. Alternatively, you could add two of the floor type pressure relief valves that are rated to 3.0 psi which would mean that you were confident that you were putting the factory recommended amount of pressure in and no more. It should also solve the sitting in the hot sun problem as well. Chris's thoughts and a step by step for adding your own PRVs are here https://apaddleinmypack.wordpress.co...motex-seawave/

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