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Thread: Gršnsfors Bruks Splitting Maul

  1. #1
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    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
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    Default Gršnsfors Bruks Splitting Maul

    Ok, granted this isn't the most lightweight camp friendly tool, but if you need one, you need one.

    Gränsfors Bruks Splitting Maul.
    5.5lb head, 31" length.



    Being a splitting maul it's got a typically short bit face and widely tapered head, ideal for life as a wedge on a stick - unlike a felling axe, with it's broader, more bearded bit face, but much narrower overall profile.

    The head is a quoted 5.5lbs, but the maul hides that well, I found the haft maybe just a little too short for me, but then I do have monkey arms ...

    In use ... well, it's not a subtle tool, but then, it's not intended to be. Whilst you can use a felling axe to split rounds, it's very far from ideal, as the profile through the cheek isn't wide enough to apply very much force, so they tend to get stuck - especially on woods like poplar, willow and most conifer (says the voice of experience).

    This thing is the complete opposite - simple and brutally effective, the profile from bit to poll feels almost perfect, the relatively narrow initial bit taper bites into the round, which makes it feels nice and secure, and then immediately starts to open the wood as that smooth but quickly widening profile through the cheek and head exerts what feels like pretty massive splitting forces on the round.

    I was splitting ~18in deep x ~12 in wide rounds in a handful of hits, often just one or two. On some very well seasoned [probably] Elm, it took maybe 12-15 hits (but I resorted to using wedges in the end as it simply wasn't going to go any other way).

    The bottom 4 inches of the handle is napped, which initially I didn't like, but having used the tool now, I've changed my mind, and appreciate the extra grip - it's not the size of tool to let go of.

    It could be used as a felling axe at a push, but it'd be uncomfortable, and possibly a bit scary - it's not really long enough to get up a swing, and it's weight is completely wrong for horizontal use - but then, that's not it's job of course.

    Not the cheapest maul, but nicely made of course, well upto the usual GB standards, the steel sheath on the shoulder is a nice touch, and should give some useful protection against any slipped hits, especially if the hammer face is in use with a wedge. I compared it with a 3kg 'no-name' farm supply maul, and whilst they both did very much the same job, this one felt smoother, and less tiring - the taper was more progressive so it flowed better, the no-name kinda felt like it jarred more in use, and seemed to need an extra hit form time to time, which would add up during the day.


    [Pictured with my little GB Wildlife Hatchet for size comparison]


    [Pictured with a GB Wildlife Hatchet and my favourite little sparhook for full size comparison]

    Conclusions ?
    Well, as mentioned above, if you need one, then there is simply no better tool for splitting rounds than a splitting maul. (Ignoring any hydraulic log splitters or any other modern, horseless carriage type malarkey).

    Would mine go canoe-camping - no, not unless I was camping in the same place for ages, but in the woodshed at home - perfect.

    I've shoved a short (and I see now, badly edited) clip on youtube which demonstrates both the potential in the tool, and my dodgy slippy-handed technique.
    Last edited by monkey_pork; 18th-March-2007 at 12:34 PM. Reason: comment about sloppy video editing ...

  2. #2
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    I have a cheap no name maul which I am trying to break so I can get a GB one but it is just not happening. Stuart_Blink was talking about getting a GB one and I gave him a bit of a ribbing saying it would be a waste of money and a cheap one would do but of course I was just jealous I am too meant to buy one until I can break the old cheap one
    John

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    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
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    Locally the no-name mauls are ~£35.00.
    This one came from Outdoorcode.

    I don't think the monkey_pork no-name maul is going to break anytime soon.
    It seems pretty tough. I'm eyeing it up with a view to reprofiling it now, which could very well make it a bit nicer to use ...


  4. #4
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    My no name maul was about £10 and does not look like breaking either.
    John

  5. #5
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    Monkey P...

    Long time no see....

    I can see that the splitter looks the biz, lotta dosh for a log chopper mind

    Is that one of the Dunsford hooks there? I keep meaning to get over that way, could do with a little hook. What do they cost nowadays, had one years ago but it's the ex's now.....

    Hope to see you on the water before long.

    Cheers

    Jon

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