Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Sailing canoe and lightning risk?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    South Cumbria
    Posts
    116

    Default Sailing canoe and lightning risk?

    On the second "seartrial" of my wooden canoe with alloy mast sailing rig on Coniston today there was plenty of weather, not much wind,but torrential rain ( flash flooding) lightning and thunder. I became a little anxious when 500m north of Peel Isle the island took a direct lightning strike with some impressive thunder. At this point I whipped the alloy mast down. Still left me anxiously holding a double blade alloy paddle. Half expected to see some St Elmos fire. But anyway what should I have done short of not having gone out in the first place ? Headed for the heavily wooded shore and hugged the shoreline ? Left the boat and curled up under the smallest tree around until the lightning stopped ? Kept paddling but away from shore ?
    Last edited by seabeggar; 28th-June-2012 at 03:09 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    I have been SUPing on Poole Harbour before, lightning started to hit the water...... I lay down QUICK and paddled back in by hand, as fast as I could :|

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    South Cumbria
    Posts
    116

    Default

    After a bit of research the best recommendation I could find is below. Was a bit surprised to read that there an estimated 24000 lightening deaths per yr mostly in the tropics and an average of 40-50 / yr in the USA:

    LIGHTNING IN A WATER ENVIRONMENT
    This panel recommends that individuals exit the water
    and seek shelter expeditiously if caught swimming during
    a lightning storm. When rafting or kayaking, move to
    shore and away from the water’s edge as soon as possible.
    When boating, seek shelter below deck after locking
    off the helm.
    28 If no shelter is available below, tie into a
    lifeline. Recommendation grade: 1C.






  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    grange over sands, cumbria
    Posts
    931

    Default

    I have been caught out a couple of times on Coniston, in a thunder storm. Worryingly the wind died completely and left me feeling very vulnerable in the middle of the lake. I think dropping the mast and paddling to shore quickly is the only option, and being surrounded by thousands of trees must surely increase the chances of the lightning striking something else, rather than a lone mast in the middle of a flat expanse of water.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •