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Thread: Outriggers - good for beginners ? & a possible DIY plan.....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    South Cumbria
    Posts
    116

    Default Outriggers - good for beginners ? & a possible DIY plan.....

    I feel I have had more than my fair share of threads this week ,but as the project nears completion I am getting a little excited & wondering about actually sailing it ( most of my sailing experience is lugsails on the Broads)

    Are outriggers useful for learning with ? not suggesting they equate to bicycle stabilisers but will they be a help or hindrance ?

    I have an idea to make a pair using to 2 inflatable boat fenders 15cm diam. by 60 cm long inserted inside a short length say 20cm of 15 cm diam. rigid PVC pipe ( centred in the middle of the fender) I would bolt thro the pipe from the inside to a length of wood. Not elegant but cheapish and quick. Would it work ? How far apart should the outriggers be ?

  2. #2

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    I built a 16ft open canoe a few years ago which I tried to sail. After getting fed up with capsizing I made 2 outriggers out of pvc soil pipe with capped ends. I went over the top with the width as they were each 4 feet from the boat giving an overall with of 10feet. Didn't quite act like a trimaran as when the actual boat section lifted out of the water it just slipped sideways with a very painful for me splash. It never tipped over though. Sadly I have no pictures.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Poole Dorset UK
    Posts
    2,282

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    My first outrigger was simply two 8 ft lengths of 3x2 with a 2ft fender tied between them.

    I then tied the timber to my gunwhales, and never looked back.



    Ive now built one out of plywood that been with me for over 100 miles.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    grange over sands, cumbria
    Posts
    930

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    I wouldn't get obsessed with the need for outriggers. They have become fashionable but most of us in the OCSG sailed for years without them. Most people can learn to sail, and sail for years without capsizing. You have a small sail that will reef, and i would try that first. If you are nervous then go for your first sail in company. There are a few canoe sailors near you who would happily go out for a sail and a cream tea on Coniston. Check out the OCSG facebook page.http://www.facebook.com/groups/152444938788/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

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    I think Dave's right. Wait until the conditions are favourable, reef the sail down nice and small and give it a try. I was really surprised how stable my canoe was to sail when I started out (I expected it to be like trying to balance on a tightrope and it was nothing like that!) If you go out in light winds with a reef in and sit in the bottom of the canoe initially until you start to get a feel for it I'm sure you'll be fine. Later on if you start to become more ambitious you may decide you'd like outriggers but they aren't vital for learning imho (the stabilisers/training wheels comparison that is sometimes made is quite unhelpful in many ways). Have fun.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    632

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    I agree with Dave and Jurassic

    Start off without outriggers and keep the sail area manageable. Outriggers can be a hindrance in conditions where sailing is fairly easy, for example where the water state is slight or the waves regular. Outriggers do come into their own if sailing in excessively windy conditions and when in more exposed locations where the state of the water / sea can be rough.

    Start off with minimal kit, keep it simple and tag along with other experienced sailors

    Good luck and enjoy!

    Steve

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