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Thread: Sevylor Colorado

  1. #1
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    Default Sevylor Colorado

    Maker's Spec

    Model - KCC335HF
    LOA - 10’6”
    Beam - 3’3”
    Weight - 32 lbs.
    Max. HP - 12V SBM
    Pers. Cap. - 2
    Max. Cap. - 500 lbs.**
    ** Inflated measurements.

    Maker's Write Up

    The Colorado has a raised bow and stern and is as close in shape, comfort and styling to the traditional North American Indian canoe as an inflatable boat will ever get. It’s double hull construction makes it very rugged and rigid. The canoe combines the stability, maneuverability and sea worthiness of a kayak with comfort, looks and styling of the traditional North American canoe. Ideally suited for rough waters, lakes, ocean, fishing and diving and great for beginners. Includes 2 bucket seats, removable stern storage compartment, 2 directional strakes, carrying handles, multiple d-rings and ties, motor mount fittings (to attach a Sevylor® SBM 12V trolling motor), and a nylon carrying bag.
    Note: Recommended accessories are new professional kayak and canoe paddles; #304T, #300P, #204IB, RB2500 pumps; and various inflators, skeg.




  2. #2
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    Cool It's (almost) all good!

    The Colorado feels well-made. I thought it might feel like a fancy li-lo, but it feels like a proper boat from the moment you get into it. It's solid and dependable and while you'd be a fool not to take the puncture-repair kit and pump, I've never really thought I'd have to use it.

    As long as you don't over-inflate it, remembering that if the day gets warmer the pressure in the canoe will increase, you'll be fine (inflate floor first then sides- deflate in reverse order).

    Take a good look under the zips to see how the tubes are arranged as soon as you get it. Sometimes you'll twist them and if you know what they're supposed to look like you can fix them in a matter of seconds (or a couple of minutes if you've inflated fully before you notice!), otherwise you'll end up paddling something that looks like a badly made bed. We have done this .

    The pockets on the seats are really useful, but don't be tempted to put your water bottle in the water-bottle sized pocket on the outside of the bow-seat. 1kg or more of water lying on the stern paddler's foot can become wearing after a while .

    There is a picture in Sevylor's brochure of a woman carrying the boat by the handle on the gunwale. Be warned, she must be about nine feet tall with short arms. I'm only six feet tall and it's not practical to portage like that in the real world. Actually moving the canoe solo once it's inflated is a bit of a puzzle. If you put it on your head it folds and you can't see where you're going. Which doesn't matter as you'll die of asphyxiation soon anyway. Fortunately the bottom of the Colorado (which looks much better in blue, incidentally ) is very tough, and you can drag it almost anywhere. With two people, loading it and carrying it by the handles is a dawdle (that means easy-peasy for the non-Scottish contingent). Carrying deflated is no problem. The quoted 18kg weight seems about right.

    If you're buying one of these, space must be at a premium, so... do you want 12 feet of soggy canoe lying on your living-room carpet? Ok, your laminate flooring then . If not you should prepare your drying rack before bringing it indoors. Some people call these "stepladders", but it should be obvious that the main function of a "stepladder" ( about five feet tall or a bit more) is to hang your canoe over, speeding the drying process and reducing the necessary floor space. It also lends a pleasing Dali-esque quality to the home. Also take a few (5?) cheap towels with you so you can get most of the water out of it before it goes in the car boot (that's "trunk" if you're in North America).

    On the water, the Colorado is slow compared with rigid hulls and the wind turns it easily because it has a big flat bottom. This is also one of its best features. It is comfortable (you can sit in those seats for hours - the inflated cushion even stops you getting cold) and stable. No, I mean stable! I think the only way to capsize a Colorado would be to get out and flip it over. The way it flexes as it sits on (or skips over) waves takes a bit of getting used to, but it's a good feeling. Power boat wakes on the other hand...

    I've never paddled WW, so I can't comment on the manufacturer's claim that it's good for Gd3, but I do know it bounces off rocks or slides over them in a way that rigid canoes don't!

    It's not really sensible to compare an inflatible to a rigid boat anyway. If you had the storage space and means of transporting a rigid canoe, you wouldn't buy an inflatible. If you do buy one you will get out paddling, meet up with other forum members and have a great life. Ok the middle one is optional (but recommended!). I paddle my Bob Special almost exclusively now, but I still wouldn't sell my Colorado.

    Jim

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hi
    Thanks BlueCanoe, thats a well written, well timed, well received (etc...) review. Very helpful tips too... Luckily I'm neither from North America or Scotland and therefore had no trouble interpreting the lingo ('dialect'), unfortunately not living in either of those areas means a slight shortage of good rivers too... Slightly worried my canoe is green not blue and I'm now concerned this may lessen my experience, I guess time will tell... I do have some blue tinted sunglasses which may help though.

    The drying issue sounds like it could be a bit of a pain cos I guess it can't go back in it's bag til it's bone dry, but presumably we'll get used to that quick enough. Just a couple of questions;
    How will I know if I've inflated to the correct pressure? Could I use a gauge?
    Does the boat come supplied with repair kit? I'm guessing my bike repair kit won't do?

    I paid £299 for my Colorado (from Adventure Supplies UK), so it seems I got a good deal. It should get its first dip this weekend. I'll send pics and feedback as and when I can.

    P.S where do I put the bike rack?
    Last edited by Dave07; 12th-April-2007 at 09:50 AM.

  4. #4
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    Default

    The Colorado comes with a gauge, and the max. pressure is printed on the boat in big white letters, so even forgetful people who need reading-glasses can manage.

    The repair kit comes as standard too. I don't see why a bicycle one wouldn't do in an emergency. The pressure is fairly low, so even if you were unlucky enough to get a puncture, it's unlikely to be a sudden catastrophic failure. Your canoe shouldn't go zipping away at speed over the surface of the water as it deflates. If I'm wrong do try to post it on YouTube .

    Here's one in blue. A perfect illustration of where not to keep your water bottle...



    Jim

  5. #5
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    Default Great reviews

    Hi Guys

    Thanks for the reviews. In terms of solo use is it possible to shift/remove seats to suit this? How comfortable is it to paddle whilst seated in the bucket seats? I really like the idea of having an inflatable lurking around just in case!!

    Nigel

  6. #6
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    Paddling solo is simply a case of putting the bow-seat in the other way around. I seem to remember reading in a blog that Aslan paddles his Ranger just kneeling on the cushion without a seat (though the Ranger seats are a bit different). I didn't get on very well with that arrangement. You could try it, but take the seat with you (and if you have one, a two-piece kayak paddle) in case you don't like it.

  7. #7
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    Took the Colorado for it's first dip. First impressions are;
    If I sat at the rear and the missus at the front (note the sailing terminology), then we were both very comfortable (I'm 15 + stone and 6 ft, the missus is 9+ stone and 5.5ft), however when we swapped seats I found the front position hopeless and the boat actually kinked and curved up at the front (probably quite amusing to watch). This may be due to my weight, or the overall distribution of weight, or, as we discovered later, due to the fact that the pressure had dropped by about 1/3!
    It did leave me wondering whether this boat would be suitable for two large lads? Perhaps others could comment...

    Regarding the pressure drop; It had dropped by about 1/3 after about 3 hours paddling. I don't know if this kind of pressure drop is normal...
    but would suggest you keep the pump on board at all times.

    As BlueCanoe points out; Don't over inflate. This is easily done, a bit too easily actualy. When it seems about right, you're very close. A few more pumps and the pressure shoots up quickly, so test it often.

    The seats are very comfortable and can be adjusted with straps, or removed if you prefer to kneel. I didn't get round to kneeling and paddling but will let you know if I do.

    Learning to paddle is a bit frustrating. If you're new like me, you will soon realise it's quite a subtle art. After three hours I was just coming to terms with the J Stroke and Canadian Stroke (I think)...

    You can't tilt the boat as you might with a solid body (at least not with two people), presumably that will prove to be a bit limiting (?)

    Overall, pretty easy to get it in the water (probably less than 15 mins from car to setting off) and easier still to dry and pack away. I'd imagine we averaged 2 MPH but would expect to double that next time. Looking forward to the next outing...


    P.S How do I upload pics?
    Last edited by Dave07; 15th-April-2007 at 01:19 PM.

  8. #8
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    ..er, I'm on a Mac, so none of that seems to apply, but thanks anyway.

    Took the Colorado for another dip yesterday;

    Can confirm it's fine for two big fellas. Can also confirm it's fine for kneeling position. Just took the seats out and off we went... only had time to try it for 10 mins, but seemed very comfortable. In fact it's much faster this way too.

    However there seems to be a problem with delation. It needed pumping up after only an hour this time. It's obviously not a slow puncture as all chambers went low. Does anyone know if this is normal?
    I spoke to Adventure Supplies, who sold it to me, (he wasn't much help), and I've e-mailed Sevylor. Don't know whether to send it back or get used to it...

    Anyone had similar problem?

  9. #9
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    Never had that happen. I guess if the water's really cold, it'll cause the air in the canoe to contract and the pressure to drop. I don't know if that would account for the amount of pressure loss you describe, but it must be something that affects all the tubes equally...

    I (and the more IT savvy Mrs BlueCanoe) know of no reason that photobucket won't work with your mac. Go to www.photobucket.com and open an account. The stuff about the browser will be slightly different, but you should still be able to post pics that way. Hope so, cos I'd like to see them.

    Anyway, hope this has been of some help!

    Jim

  10. #10
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    Thanks Jim
    It was a nice warm day on warm water. If yours isn't deflating, I'll have to assume either mine's faulty or I'm doing something wrong... Not much you can do wrong though is there?

    I've agreed with my supplier that I'll take it out a couple more times, check all the valves are all tight, and see if just some kind of teething troubles. Otherwise it's going back.

    Regarding pics;
    I usually use 'imageshack', which is basically the same thing, but doesn't seem to be working on here. To be honest when it comes to this sort of thing, if I can't just drag and drop, or if it takes more than about 1 minute, I lose interest.
    Also there is a window in the corner of this page called "Posting Rules" saying "You may not post attachments".

    I'll happily e-mail any pics (only 2 so far) to anyone that wants though.

  11. #11
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    Hi
    Just found this site, http://www.riversandclouds.co.uk/films.asp?x=23&y=12 it as some film clips of the Sevylor Colerado in action

    Kevin

  12. #12
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    Default Deflation problem

    The problem you are having doesn't sound right. I paddle a Sevylor Ranger and found that similar problems had one of two causes:

    1: Valve - cross threaded valve or a tiny bit of grass inside breaking the seal.

    2: A tiny leak on a seam. This can frequently not be noticed until max. pressure is reached. Beware when testing for this that you don't over inflate as you can burst the seam - i've done it.

    Always take a spare pump in the boat - I never leave shore without one.

    Shame if this problem puts you off as inflatables do have their place.
    Aslan




  13. #13
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    Hi
    Thanks Aslan, that's just the advice I was hoping for from Sevylor or my supplier. Sevylor (European branch) have not been any help at all, my supplier has simply said 'try it again' (not much help either).

    I agree it just doesn't seem right. I'll check the valves before I send it back. I assume if the seam is split it can't be repaired?

    I'm a bit surprised the over inflating can do so much damage. I would have expected the seams to be a bit more durable, especially as its so easy to over inflate (with the pressure being so low).

    If it wasn't deflating I think I'd be quite pleased with it. So I think I'll exchange it and hope for better luck next time.

    Thanks again, Dave

    P.S Thanks Nigel for the pic posting tips, I'll get round to it before too long...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave07 View Post
    I'm a bit surprised the over inflating can do so much damage. I would have expected the seams to be a bit more durable, especially as its so easy to over inflate (with the pressure being so low).
    Suprised me to but it was "interesting" to watch a small seam leak grow into a 4 inch split. Couldn't think of any other explanation. I'm told you can repair a large leak like this but it has defeated me so far.
    Aslan




  15. #15

    Default

    Just got a Colorado today, it will just fit in my bedroom
    Taking it with me to the Lake District at the weekend.
    So soon i will be able to comment on how it handles to.

  16. #16

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    Got it out for a trip Saturday, on Elterwater in Lake District.
    Real quick to inflate only brought a little sweat out on my forehead, i blame the sun.
    In the water i can only agree that it is very stable.
    Took a little getting used to paddling it without turning the boat 90 degrees with each paddle stroke, but when getting used to it it was no problem keeping it on a straight line.

    I think i might have to go try it out at the Whitewater course here in Nottingham and find out if its true that it will do grade 3 whitewater....

  17. #17

    Default deflation problem

    I've been having a lot of fun in my Colorado and even ventured onto Jackfield rapids last week. It's definitely made for going down rapids.

    As for the deflation problem some of you are experiencing. I've found that about 5-10 minutes after paddling around, the kayak goes saggy as if it's under inflated. I found that simply stopping and putting some more air in it gets rid of the problem. It's probably the cold water causing the air in the kayak to cool resulting in the air pressure dropping. I found that after re-pumping it it stays rigid for the whole day!
    Chrissio

  18. #18

    Default Sea kayaking in a Colorado

    Has anybody tried taking one of these things out on the waves? Any comments, tips welcome.
    Chrissio

  19. #19

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    Hello I'm new here but I just had to say we have just ordered a Colerado from the states (in green I have to say, as we want to sneak up on things and green is quieter I'm sure). How come they are so much cheaper, we got the canoe, 2 pfd's and a wet bag for the price of a cheap one in england and that included £100 shipping (express, as we are a wee bit excited).

    We were going for the cheaper option of the voyager/ranger/amazon (or whatever its called today) but having been to Cambridge yesterday to check it out and seeing the Colorado and the Backcountry inflated next to it there didn't seem much of a choice. We are a bit clumsy and that seemed a much tougher boat. However I would like to know a few things, there will be a bit of spare weight capacity with me and the bloke and I wondered if its wise to cram in any extra gear for short lightweight camping trips? just in case the fancy takes us.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  20. #20

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    I must confess that I got mine from the States too (they didn’t have stealth green when I ordered mine). Luckily I had a good friend that lugged it over for me when he came to visit so it worked out less than half price.

    Anyway I've been toying with the idea of filling the boat up with camping gear. I think a large dry sack could easily be lashed to the stern- could probably pile it up quite high as the Colorado itself is very steady. You could also lash a dry sack on the front with some bungee cords too. You'll see that it has plenty of loops for tieing things down. Depends on how much stuff you need to bring with you. It’s not the worlds largest boat but if you pack carefully I’m sure you can canoe/camp for quite a while. I wouldn't suggest going over any grade 3 with it fully loaded though!

    I'm hoping to do 3-4 days canoe/camp with the girlfriend down the Wye in about 3 weeks time. I'll let you know how it goes.
    Chrissio

  21. #21
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    Default

    Prior to buying my Stearns Spree 2 locally a couple of months ago, I toyed with the idea of buying online from the States. After adding 169USD P&P plus import tax(which is calculated including p&p) the saving wasn't that great.Anyways I'm not very good at waiting.
    Going solo I have been overnight camping. Being vertically challenged (5'6")means that I'm able to sleep inside the canoe - the floor is like an airbed. The canoe/kayak is very stable which is good as I was an absolute beginner. Great fun on the open sea. Not sure it is robust enough for white water. I'm never going to launch off a sandy beach again as cleaning out took longer than the paddle itself.
    The two skegs fore and aft make for easy tracking. As expected I can't keep up with rigid canoes/kayaks. More maintenance is required than a rigid but I find the Spree 2 very versitile which suits my needs.
    Jim

  22. #22

    Default

    Funnily enough, jimegret, when we tried them out my first thought (probably not a good omen for future paddling trips) was that I could quite happily sleep in it . This could cause arguments when theres two of you though.

    Transportability was our main reason for buying an inflatable (and the small matter of price), being able to take it with you wherever you go, on the off chance there might be some water. Without having a 14' solid thing strapped to the top of our tiny car. Also they do look remarkably stable, always a good thing for us novices. Don't think we will be trying it on the sea yet, our part of the suffolk coast has some very strong currents and I think we need to practice a bit first.

    Let me know Chrissio how you get on with the loading.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  23. #23
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    Just ordered one from Princeton Outdoors in the states http://www.princetonoutdoor.com/
    It'll be delivered to a friend in New York who will bring it over when they come in next month or I'll collect it when I go out after Christmas. Just £35 dollars sales tax and shipping to add to the web page price. A bit of a wait to get my new toy but given the fact that is has cost me less in $ (by 50!) than the cheapest I found it for in £ (and the price means it is under the personal import duty threshold so all done and paid for about half the UK price) I'm willing to wait a few weeks!
    Looks like they have sold out now at Princeton as the Colorado has vanished from the web shop
    Last edited by dtalbot; 18th-September-2007 at 04:47 PM.

  24. #24
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    UPS say my Colorado has been delivered today, slight problem it is the wrong side of the atlantic and I won't get it till late Oct or early Jan depending how things pan out but given the fact I've paid less for a Colorado than most places in the UK want for a Tahiti I think I can live with that!

  25. #25

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    I just don't think i could wait that long, my impatient side took over from the thrifty one. Still paid less than we would have in England though. Can't wait till tomorrow-our first trip.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  26. #26

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    You'll love it sheep. Going anywhere nice?
    Chrissio

  27. #27
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    I'm normally impatient as well but getting a boat that normally costs over £300 here for well under $300 in the states and been able to bring it back pesonally so no tax to add was just too big a saving to pass up on!

  28. #28

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    I'm sure I will Chrissio. Think we're going to Beccles on the Waveney and upstream, we walked it earlier in the year which was one of things that made us want our own canoe. It should be reasonably quiet at this time of the year and it shouldn't be tidal that far up (i hope) We went further down towards Oulton Broad in a rental and that was hard going for a pair of novices against the tide. I was hoping a local landowner might have let us use his lake so we could make fools of ourselves in private the first time but he thinks the paying anglers are more important.

    I'll let you know how we get on.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  29. #29

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    Well I'm planning to get up at the crack of dawn and see how far one man in a Colorado can go down the Tees in a day (the flat bit not the white water bit). I'll take some pics and write a blog when I'm done. Make sure you take a camera sheep.
    Chrissio

  30. #30

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    Just thought I would add my comments in now having had a couple of trips. My opinion only.

    Its really is very quick to inflate, approx 10min, but deflating can be a bit of a pain due to the lilo type valve on the base chamber, why this couldn't be a boston valve like the side chambers I dont know. Once you've got the air out it needs to be packed up quite carefully to get it back in the bag.

    Its so stable I reckon its probably impossible to tip over, it might tip you out but not over.

    It feels awesome the way it flexes over the undulations in the water and I too am very tempted to take it out in a sheltered bay.

    Gently wind isn't too much of a problem wouldnt reccomend taking it out in a gale - when you've got the hang of it it is quite easy to keep in straight(ish)line, but I think we will get a pair of skegs to aid this.

    It is very comfortable due to the bucket style seats.

    And with the external bladders it feels like it will be extremely resistant to puncture.

    As to it being the closest to a north american canoe as you get i would slightly disagree as I have seen others that look, at least whether they feel it, much more 'authentic' The wide sides do restrict you from using it with a canoe paddle. I do but I reckon someone with more experience of traditional boats would find it odd to get used to.

    But saying that it is great and we are thrilled and both reckon its earn't its money already! People still think we've bought a kids dinghy though and we have to carry a photo around with us to prove how sturdy it is.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  31. #31
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    Great to read all that, still waiting for mine to cross the atlantic but should be here around the end of the month!

  32. #32

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    I recently bought a Colorado from Hereford and Borders Canoes and I have to say that I'm delighted with it. They have a small test lake there which allowed me to get a feel for what is to me a completely new sport.

    Initially impressions were of amazement: how could a canoe be contained in such a small box ? However, once laid out in the front room I realised that this was actually quite a large boat. I have to say that the instructions were fairly poor but after a bit of faffing I had the canoe inflated.

    Within in minutes it was on the canal which is just at the back of us and I was off paddling. At the moment I've got a pair of splitable kayak paddles and these seem to work quite well with the boat, allowing for good progress to be made.

    It's certainly the case that enthusiastic paddling can cause a fair amount of yawing from side to side but after trying to refine my technique I've reduced this to a minimum.

    Only problem was that initially I had problems with one of the side chambers going down but this seems to be due to one Boston valve fitting better on one side than the other. Marking them so that the appropriate one goes into the appropriate side seems to have sorted that out.

    After a few more canal trips myself and a work colleague decided to paddle down the Wye from Hole-in-the-Wall to Kerne Bridge. We were advised that this would take an entire day but completed it comfortable in around 5 hours including a stop for food in Ross-on-Wye.

    Encouraged by this, I, my wife and our two year old son paddled from Ross down to Kerne Bridge last sunday. We had a brilliant time.

    I guess the only downside so far is that 1) it might only take minutes to inflate and deflate but this is never going to happen because people will always stop and ask you about your Colorado, and 2) it does seem to take an eternity to dry. But at least it's purchase has resulted in me tidying out the garage for the first time in years !

    Overall: highly recommend, comfortable, easy to store, easy to inflate and lots of fun

  33. #33
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    my father in law has the colerado and finds that it drys out well if he turns it upside down while he watches me make him a cup of tea,puts it on the roof or his car open side up and the driving home and most of its gone

  34. #34

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    I've got a Seadoo, which is very similar if not the same as a Colorado, first time out today on the Rochdale canal and it was great, used the paddles kayak style and eventually kept it straightish. had a problem with one of the side chamber de-flating I'll try swapping the Boston values around, though I have found a patch on the bladder( bought off a guy who said there was no repairs. ha e-bay for you. Back to paddling there must be a skill to use the paddle canoe style, I just hope I can find it as I get rather wet using them kayak style.

  35. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by poppoboffin View Post
    I've got a Seadoo, which is very similar if not the same as a Colorado, first time out today on the Rochdale canal and it was great, used the paddles kayak style and eventually kept it straightish. had a problem with one of the side chamber de-flating I'll try swapping the Boston values around, though I have found a patch on the bladder( bought off a guy who said there was no repairs. ha e-bay for you. Back to paddling there must be a skill to use the paddle canoe style, I just hope I can find it as I get rather wet using them kayak style.
    Why not try the K79 skeg I've heard that it will help the tracking you could even make a small rudder "purists look away " to fit through/into the electric motor mounts.

  36. #36
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    It's here now, had a look at it in the living room and its very nice (and very blue, good job its my favorite colour!) Not sure when I'll get to play as I'm busy tomorrow and then back in single parent mode next weekend but can't wait!

  37. #37

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    You will enjoy it. We havent been able to take ours out for a while and are planning a short trip this afternoon but its a tad bit windy so open estuary plans will have to change.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  38. #38
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    Default sevylor rio 305

    ive got a green one here in the shed, make me an offer, its been played with on loch maree for three days, and 2 days on the local canal, very good when its nor rough weather,all the best Tom what could possibly go wrong ! ?

  39. #39

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    Can anyone give me any idea/experience about how the Colorado goes on grade 1/2 rapids? As a novice others experience would be much appreciated Cheers

  40. #40
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    99

    Default sevylor colorado

    I have the rio which is the same boat but 305 size single seat job, ive paddlad some hairy stuff, and it handles better than it does on the flat stuff,its easier to steer too, you literaly go with the flow,i think choice of paddle may play a role, im not technically up on paddles, but i borrowed a friends werner, and i did notice a more positive stroke than the old stp job,i got with it,i only wished id had it exploring the islands of loch maree,the wind and waves made for a rough ride,one stroke left five quick strokes right,the canoes were ridiculously over loaded too,in fact we could barely see over the rucksaks and dry bags ! we were safe vests etc,the only thing in danger was the gear, of being thrown over the sides,i always felt safe though, as these little craft cling limpet like to the water,i reckon they are better suited to moving water,definately,

  41. #41

    Default

    i've just got my Rio and it came with out a paddle. i was wondering what paddle i should get.
    i got the rio as i thought it to be one of the most adaptable canoes out there, but which is better for the boat, a kayak paddle or a canoe paddle? i've paddled rigid sit on tops and sit in kayaks so im comfotable with that but the Rio seems to wide to do this (i havnt been on the water yet and probebly wont till january).
    do i need to learn to use a canue paddle or will i just pick it up?
    or maybe i'll just get to sevylor moter and give my arms a rest....

  42. #42

    Default

    They are apparantly designed for use with both but if you are used to a double blade use one you'll no doubt get along a lot quicker and straighter. Although as you can probably figure out you get very wet with out a splash deck.
    sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell!

  43. #43

    Default

    indeed, i was planning on getting the TNP Combination paddle using the single paddle for river work and the double for the sea (where staying dry isnt an option!)

  44. Default Air Pressure?

    Hi,

    I've just perchased a second-hand Seadoo 2 man inflatable kayak. Apparently, it is made by the same manufacturers as the Sevylor Colerado but just branded as a Seadoo. I didn't get an instruction manual with it and I'm a bit wary of over inflating it.

    Could anybody please tell me what the pressure should be as it's not printed on the side of the kayak like it is on the Colerado.

    Many thanks for any help.

  45. Default

    IIRC it's 100mbar or just under 1.5 PSI

  46. Default

    Replying, to whoever it was mentioning in the thread about going out to sea on a inflatable. I have a Sevylor Ranger. I only use it for sea use. Great little boat. Precautions with the sea are needed. It's gotta be a sheltered bay, preferably windless and time your use for when the tide is coming in. Also it goes without saying a buoyancy aid is needed, wetsuit/drysuit if you are going out into far out deeper waters and more importantly a way of getting back into the Kayak. Inflatables are a bit of a nightmare to get back in when you have toppled over in deep water. Try and pull yourself back in one, nightmare. The way i have got around this is to use a long/lightweight marine rope and use quick release Karabiner links and then using these attach a quality surfers bodyboard to the rope via two drilled holes and let the bodyboard loosely follow the Kayak six foot behind in the water. The rope is cut to the length of the Kayak and then attached to the back of the Kayak. The rope must be the same length if not a little more as it needs to be long enough to swing around to the side of the Kayak whilst still connected to the back of the kayak so you can then connect it to the front of the kayak by pulling excess rope through and then using another pre-connected Karabiner link and attachig to the front pull handle for example. Then if i fall out doing this creates a nice, really secure stable step to get back onboard. It also gives extra assurances that if the Kayak rapidly deflated you could then use the bodyboard as a bouyancy backup aid and as a support/tool to swimming back to shallow waters. I never leave without the attached bodyboard and it doesn't hinder the kayak in any way. Also using a leash attach the oars to the Sevylor.
    Myself i find the Sevlyor Ranger very stable for sea use but if you were to fall out it will be a nightmare to get back in the Sevylor Ranger in deep, bigger waves, sea water. Hence the bodyboard backup which makes it far easier. If you are in shallow waters, no worries really.
    Saying that the Colorado maybe far easier but i would still attach a bodyboad backup for sea use anyway. When it comes to the sea you can never rely on rescue. You may have to rely on yourself.

    I dunno much about inflation either. I just pump it up until it's really firm knowing the sea water will reduce the pressure as well. Sevylor have a printed text 'thingy thing' on it to use a guide but i'm thick and i don't really understand it. I know about pressure obviously, i just don't understand how to use their way of working it out with that printed line/mark, whatever it is (can't remember) on the Kayak. I wish you could just buy a pump that had a boston valve friendly pressure dial built in or just a pressure gadget for boston valve inflatables. Can you ? Be far easier !
    Last edited by Dwighty; 9th-June-2008 at 10:42 AM.

  47. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Co Antrim, Northern Ireland
    Posts
    230

    Default deflation and comparison with a sea-kayak

    As you pump you compress the air which heats it up, hot air expands. The faster you pump the boat up the warmer the air will be. When it sits in the canoe for a while it cools to close to the water temperature (assuming the sun isn't keeping it warm) and it contracts.
    If the boat goes soft after a while on the water and even though you pump it up again it keeps going soft, you have a leak/valve issue.
    If, once you top it up the once it stays firm then it's simply the air contracting. Pumping it up slower should help, alternativey you can just remember you need to top it up after it's been on the (cold) water for a while.

    The canoe combines the stability, maneuverability and sea worthiness of a kayak
    Stability - probably
    Maneuverability - doubtfull
    Sea worthiness -
    Last edited by Ekij; 16th-June-2008 at 06:39 PM. Reason: wanted an image not a link and to improve clarity

  48. #48

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwighty View Post
    Replying, to whoever it was mentioning in the thread about going out to sea on a inflatable. I have a Sevylor Ranger. I only use it for sea use. Great little boat. Precautions with the sea are needed. It's gotta be a sheltered bay, preferably windless and time your use for when the tide is coming in. Also it goes without saying a buoyancy aid is needed, wetsuit/drysuit if you are going out into far out deeper waters and more importantly a way of getting back into the Kayak. Inflatables are a bit of a nightmare to get back in when you have toppled over in deep water. Try and pull yourself back in one, nightmare. The way i have got around this is to use a long/lightweight marine rope and use quick release Karabiner links and then using these attach a quality surfers bodyboard to the rope via two drilled holes and let the bodyboard loosely follow the Kayak six foot behind in the water. The rope is cut to the length of the Kayak and then attached to the back of the Kayak. The rope must be the same length if not a little more as it needs to be long enough to swing around to the side of the Kayak whilst still connected to the back of the kayak so you can then connect it to the front of the kayak by pulling excess rope through and then using another pre-connected Karabiner link and attachig to the front pull handle for example. Then if i fall out doing this creates a nice, really secure stable step to get back onboard. It also gives extra assurances that if the Kayak rapidly deflated you could then use the bodyboard as a bouyancy backup aid and as a support/tool to swimming back to shallow waters. I never leave without the attached bodyboard and it doesn't hinder the kayak in any way. Also using a leash attach the oars to the Sevylor.
    Myself i find the Sevlyor Ranger very stable for sea use but if you were to fall out it will be a nightmare to get back in the Sevylor Ranger in deep, bigger waves, sea water. Hence the bodyboard backup which makes it far easier. If you are in shallow waters, no worries really.
    Saying that the Colorado maybe far easier but i would still attach a bodyboad backup for sea use anyway. When it comes to the sea you can never rely on rescue. You may have to rely on yourself.

    I dunno much about inflation either. I just pump it up until it's really firm knowing the sea water will reduce the pressure as well. Sevylor have a printed text 'thingy thing' on it to use a guide but i'm thick and i don't really understand it. I know about pressure obviously, i just don't understand how to use their way of working it out with that printed line/mark, whatever it is (can't remember) on the Kayak. I wish you could just buy a pump that had a boston valve friendly pressure dial built in or just a pressure gadget for boston valve inflatables. Can you ? Be far easier !
    Hi,
    I have a sevylor ranger as well. I've only used it twice so far on the sea, on the Tweed at Berwick a couple of weeks ago & last weekend at Filey. My mate has one as well & we met up at Filey. Well, We paddled out to the end of Filey Brigg & back, then went as far as the end of the promenade & back to the sailing club where we originally launched...We even managed to catch a few waves on to the beach! great fun. One thing though..the self bailers don't work closed up! Also, they are strictly one person canoes..

    pics to follow.

    best, dogseal.

  49. #49

    Default camping in the colorado no problem

    weekend Boat fully loaded for weekend camp on derwent water Fit two people, tent cooking equitment,food & beer

  50. Default

    I am taking my Colorado up to Keswick when we go caravanning in August. Would like to take my lad out camping overnight, preferably on an Island. Do you have any recommendations ?

  51. #51

    Default Colorado 2 man

    Hello All

    I am new to the site and have recentley, along with my dearest (boss) and 2 others (sister and brother in law), bought a Colorado 2 man, Green in colour. To test its water worthyness I and my brother in law took to the waters of Windemere and then Derwent Water recently

    We were both very impressed at its capabilities and stability. Glad that we bought it. It rides the waves and boat wakes very easily. I agree that any wind will move it unless you are in control.

    As we live close to the Tees we are starting to use it to explore the 'Lake' (for those who know the Tees, this will be a self evident description). The wildlife is great. We are even thinking of buying another Sevylor. Maybe the Rio this time as we can then explore singly as well as in a group.

    I was amazed and impressed at Baldpaddler's packing capability of the Colorado. It gives me ideas for the future.

    I have canoed down the Wye earlier this year - solid canoe - and thought that the Colorado and or Rio would be just as capable as it is straight forward in navigation terms. The only thing to be careful of are the fishermen croys. These are man made stone constructions that extend into the river from either sides of the river and act as current changers so that salmon and trout can utilise the created calm pools just below them. they are numerous and if the river is in full spate would be submerged. Look out for the ripples and'mini rapi' like water changes. Apart from them - although they do make easy landing points for breaks - the Wye is an excellent river to canoe down.

    Look forward to conversing with the rest of you

    Skeifre

  52. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Middlesbrough (no - don't laugh!)
    Posts
    241

    Default

    hi Skeifre,

    me and pugwash, (my brother in law) have been down the Tees a few times in a colorado, (fast blue!). We are based in Middlesbrough so if you fancy a trip from Yarm down to the barrage sometime drop us a line!

    if you do a search i think you'll find a blogg we did some time ago of our first outing.

    if the lake you are using is the one i think it is are you based around ingleby barwick area?

    Hope to see you out on the river!
    Last edited by thumbcrusher; 1st-August-2008 at 04:27 PM. Reason: spelling
    If a man opens his mouth to speak and there is no woman around, is he still wrong?

  53. #53

    Default

    Cheers to you Thumcrusher

    I am based at Yarm and I find the 'Lake' an easy training water to use.

    At some stage I would like to visit the wonders that are Boro (the Tees stretch, that is).

    I am sure that our GREEN Colorado is just as capable as your blue.

    As metioned in my earlier message, I am thinking of investing in a Rio. Will it be cheaper to buy from USA rather than GB. The price (UK)difference between a Rio and the Colorado is not as great as I hoped for.

    Keep on canoeing

    Skeifre

  54. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Eden Valley - Cumbria
    Posts
    138

    Default first paddle in an inflatable




    now then, if i have done this right you can see a recent family expedition on Ullswater. On the left we have a set of parents in their new colerado the blue canoe at the back is a wood canvas Huron which looks huge next to the inflatable, and a pyranha ranger at the front.

    The two piece kayak paddles supplied with the colerado were uncomfy when used in two to make single paddles, as they have no hand grips on them (and they were just a bit rubbish, too short and light, but cheap enough to give away according to the guy in the shop).

    With wooden paddles the Colerado really held it's own and resolved the long debated question of how to carry a canoe on/in a high top camper van.

    The seats with the backs on them are comfy and made it easier to paddle as you have to sit rather than kneel and the backs give you support to get some power into the stroke.

    However when we swapped in between boats the low seating position takes some getting used to and there are a number of plastic attachments on the outside of the hull that can catch your forearm when paddling.

    The folks have been wanting a canoe for a while and the Colerado has solved their storage/ transport issues. The build quality exceeded our expectations and it felt really robust.

    all in all we were impressed

    (p.s if there is no photo in this post, I.T. support would be appreciated)
    Last edited by KeithD; 2nd-August-2008 at 08:02 PM. Reason: photo

  55. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Keynsham near Bristol
    Posts
    3,748

    Default

    You were nearly there with the photo but you had linked to the whole page rather than just the photo. Try another one but this time right click on the photo, then click "copy image location". Then return to your post on SotP, click on the "Insert Image" icon and paste, ensuring you do not duplicate the "http://"

    Good luck.
    Keith

  56. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Eden Valley - Cumbria
    Posts
    138

    Thumbs up thanks keith

    ta very much, very helpful, i can see the picture now- did you make that happen

    and thanks for the advice elsewhere,

    all the best

  57. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Middlesbrough (no - don't laugh!)
    Posts
    241

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skeifre View Post
    As metioned in my earlier message, I am thinking of investing in a Rio. Will it be cheaper to buy from USA rather than GB. The price (UK)difference between a Rio and the Colorado is not as great as I hoped for.
    Skeifre
    Hi Skeifre,

    I looked at buying my colorado from usa but by the time you added import duty and the longer delivery times i found it just not worth the effort and bought from the uk instead.
    As the price difference between the rio and colorado isnt very much why not just buy another colorado but only fit one seat. that way you have the best of both worlds as you can double up if you want to or paddle solo. The hull of the rio and colorado are the same size i beleive, (If i'm wrong i know someone on here will put me right) so the only difference is the extra seat.
    If a man opens his mouth to speak and there is no woman around, is he still wrong?

  58. #58
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,167

    Default

    I've now used my (very) blue Colorado twice, so thought I'd pass on my first impressions.

    I bought it from Berks Canoes in Reading, after researching prices online in the UK, which they were happy to "match" by throwing in product. As a retailer myself I know its better for the shop to give an amount away in product rather than cash & we came to an arrangement I think we were both happy with. I decided to support the UK trade rather than save what would actually be only a modest amount from the US with taxes & shipping, even though I'll be there with work next month. I got some TNP 2-piece paddles which complement it well but are only just long enough to clear the tubes. Think they're 215cm.

    Construction.
    The whole thing seems eminently well made & durable. Whilst some of the seams are not the prettiest bit of sewing, they all seem strong. The nylon "fixtures & fittings" are all of a very high quality. The 2 main tubes have Boston valves which are good. The base only has an "airbed" type valve, & this is a bit of a pain, particularly when deflating. THe seats also use the inferior valve type but this is fine there.

    Design Features
    Whilst it would be a little tight for 2 very tall adults, the Colorado is very comfortable for 2 "normal" human beings. The seats can be adjusted into all sorts of positions, & offer good support. The seat back storage pockets are neat, though care needs to be taken not to foul the feet of the rear occupant. There is a mesh storage bag that clips into the stern & is an excelletn feature. Plenty of clip/tie on points & paddle holders complete the picture. There is a clip on "keel" (skeg?) which helps keep it in a straight line. There is a carry bag, which is adequate but nothing special. I have an old 100+ litre duffle bag with wide zip entry & rucksack straps that is perfect for it, fortunately.

    Inflation
    A pressure gauge is provided to ensure you keep to the correct 1.5psi. Start with the base & then the sides. Inflation is relatively quick, but definitely get a double action stirrup pump rather than "bellows" type. When you first use it, check with the gauge regulalrly. At first nothign seems to be happening but when you finally get close it can be a matter of only a few strokes between 0.5 & 1.5 PSI. The gauge is quite fiddly to use with the Boston valves, as you need to ensure a "needle" lines up with one of the small holes in the valve base, & it seems that this needle may not last up to long term abuse. Its a bit of a knack. Check the tubes seem to be lined up properly, if not deflate them a bit & push them into place.

    On the water.
    As mentioned by others elsewhere, the air inside the chambers is artificially "warmed" & therefore expanded when pumping. You then plonk it onto relatively cold water. After about 10 minutes you can find you have lost 0.5-1.0 psi. Half a dozen pump strokes fixes this. It may be that pumping up early & letting it stand then rechecking will help this, or better putting it into the water whilst you sort yourself out & have a snack.
    Once up & away, it is easy to get the hang of paddling using a kayak paddle if solo. 2 people can use canoe style paddles easily & I prefer this, but I can't get the hang of this on my own! Its not a fast craft, but I did manage to keep ahead of an old man & his dog walking along the bank!!! More speed MAY come with practice. I am yet to try 2 passengers with kayak paddles, this may be fastest, or may just be a nightmare of clashed paddles knowing my limited abilities!
    Using it solo I've found moving the rear seat forward to its limit is just about far enough to bring the nose down under control. You could reverse the boat & turn the seat round on the front seat, but the boat is not quite symmetrical in design & the skeg would then be near the front rather than under you. I will try this & report in another time.
    The boat is highly manouevreable in close quarters on still water, as I found when I had to "rescue" a drifting cabin cruiser by passing a line after only 10 minutes in the water! No, I didn't attempt to tow it!
    Wind affects the boat quite a lot, but not ridiculously so.

    Deflation & drying
    To be honest, this is a bit of a pain, but thats the price you pay for the flexibility of storage & portability. The process is simple enough, & deflation of the 2 main tubes is virtually instant with the Boston valves. The base takes a bit longer & you need to force the air out as you roll it, then re-roll it at the end. This is all fine. The problem is simply that of getting it dry. Before deflation, unplug the drain hole & hold upright to remove the standing water. In an ideal world, you can then let it airdry & deflate when dry. For me though, the whole point is that I want something quick & easy to use in evenings, & to store in my first floor flat. Towelling will speed it up, but ideally you do need somewhere to re-open & dry the thing after getting it home & I'm hoping my neighbours won't mind it hanging over the shared banister occasionally as it did last night! If you have time at weekends it is no real problem though. Maybe I am being too fussy about it being perfectly dry before putting it away, but I've spent my life trying to avoid mouldy wet tents after camping in the rain. I can't see how you can ever sensibly get all the damp out from between the cover & tubes though, perhaps storing in a huge mesh bag would be an option.

    Summary
    Anyway, thats a lot of detail. TO be honest, any criticisms are minor apart from the faff of drying which isn't the fault of the design just a fact of life! Overall the Sevylor is a joy to use, quick to get ready, fits in the boot of the car easily & paddles pretty well. More than anything it offers the freedom of canoing when either travelling with a rooftop boat is impossible or like me you live somewhere with zero storage. It might not be as good to paddle as a "real" canoe, but its certainly no toy either & has opened up a whole new future of little adventures to me.

    Design & Construction 8/10
    Performance on water 7/10
    Packing & storage 7/10

    Overall 7.5/10

  59. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,167

    Default

    HTML Code:
    As mentioned by others elsewhere, the air inside the chambers is artificially "warmed" & therefore expanded when pumping. You then plonk it onto relatively cold water. After about 10 minutes you can find you have lost 0.5-1.0 psi. Half a dozen pump strokes fixes this. It may be that pumping up early & letting it stand then rechecking will help this, or better putting it into the water whilst you sort yourself out & have a snack.
    Quick update. Buying a better stirrup pump rather than the bellows type seems to have solved this, or reduced it to a minimum. Presumably the action/size doesn't heat the air up quite as much.

    Also, have tried "reversing" the boat to put the seat slightly more central when solo. This did not really work, as with less weight over the skeg its much harder to keep straight. To be honest, sitting in the rear seat, with it reasonably far forward on the integral "cushion" its perfectly fine anyway.

  60. #60

    Default Sevylor Colorado direction problems solved (so far)

    I posted elsewhere regarding help required as I have one of the latest Colorado models with detachable skeg. This was lost on only its second outing which made keeping the canoe in a straight line very very difficult. In fact I was getting quite frustrated with the canoe as it spun so easily.

    Through other areas of the forum I learnt that the Sevylor Amazon skeg could be adapted for the Colorado. Last Sunday I managed to try out this combination on Lake Bala and here are my findings.

    I fixed the Amazon Skeg on the left rear of the canoe. This I managed to do with a wooden spoon from the kitchen using it as a dowel to attach skeg to the motor housing top hole. Total cost = £16 quid for skeg and approx £1 for new wooden spoon (from poundland).

    Im approx 18st and sit in rear of canoe and misses in front of canoe is about 12st (but if you see her, swear I said 10st!!!). We then paddled off into the distance..after about 2-3 minutes this feeling of shear joy entered me as we were actually going in a straight line. Yipee!!

    After about an hour we shifted paddling hands and then I reaslised that although still much better than previous occasions in trying to keep the boat straight, it wasnt as easy and the ladyfriend at the front was having to paddle more strokes than me. If I paddled at the same rate as the misses then the boat would turn too much. Ive now sussed why..I have no scientific knowledge re this, but this is what I learnt.

    To paddle in a straight line with skeg positioned left rear, I in the back of the boat when paddling Indian style have to paddle on the right hand side of the canoe. The misses at the front then paddles on the left hand side. All this means the canoe goes in a straight line.

    When we swapped arms and I in the rear paddled to the left of the canoe (brushing past the skeg) and the misses paddled to the right hand side then the canoe kept pulling to the right. The misses in the front had to do about 5 strokes to my one. I can only imagine that this is something to do with my paddle action next to the skeg is forcing it to turn too much to the right.

    I will put the skeg on the right side of the canoe next time to see if the same applies in reverse and report back.

    Just for info when we paddle kayak style the canoe does go in a straight line.

    Overall I feel that the Amazon skeg gives the canoe much better direction than the skeg that came with the canoe. The £17 investment so far is really worth it. If you like me have lost your skeg and have 0 DIY skills then buy the skeg, get a wooden spoon and your sorted.

    If this helps any other sevylor owners could you let the 'forum' know for future sevylor colorado owners....

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