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Thread: Sevylor KCC305

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    260

    Default Sevylor Rio KCC305

    Maker's Spec

    Max. capacity adults 1
    Length x width (cm, flat) 310 x 109
    Product weight (kg) 12
    Max. load capacity (kg)100
    Number inflatable chambers 4
    Standard ISO 6185-1

    Maker's Write Up
    1 person canoe/kayak. Rugged and stable : for river travelling and discovery outings along the sea shore. Construction : 2 removable side inflatable chambers, outer hull in heavy duty nylon, 1 ergonomic adjustable seat, directional strakes, inflatable floor, self bailer, 1 elevated inflatable seating area, front + rear handles, multiple D-rings and ties (for paddles and accessories), carrying bag, pressure gauge.
    Same features as the Colorado except with 1 bucket seat on KCC305 and KCC305HF.
    Last edited by Canoe Guru; 11th-March-2007 at 10:13 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    30

    Default

    I've recently become an owner of the Sevylor Rio KCC305
    inflateable canoe, and it's been loads of fun so far.

    Basics.

    It (the Rio) weighs 25lbs
    in it's nylon compression bag,
    the bag has shoulder straps and
    I could walk all day with this canoe
    on my back.


    The canoe has some very sturdy tie downs and d-rings
    as well as the formal mountings for the optional electric
    motor, which are mirrored on both sides of the canoe.
    Really it's hard to fault anything about the quality of the
    Rio, it's contemporary, comfortable, and casually calm,
    all at once.

    It's the kind of canoe that would suit James Bond
    or a navy seal, it's a tactical solution, a recon platform,
    discreet and dependable.

    Details.

    The seat is incredibly comfortable, and strong.
    The seat is resting on it's own airbag and is firmly
    attached to the boat with adjustable straps
    offering excellent lower back support.

    Behind the seat is a belt with water bottle holders
    a rod holder, and a stow pouch, it detaches from the seat
    and can be worn as a seperate belt....brilliant!

    Behind the seating sytem is a cargo net bag
    a bout 50 litres, which is suspended from
    the deck via tie downs, it's possible to
    have additional bags under the cargo net bag,
    or, perhaps keep a spare battery there....

    In the water.

    I needed to be able to paddle up
    the local rivers and creeks,
    so, I had issues with the vanilla canoe....

    Luckily, I found one internet forum reply
    which reckoned you need the K79 skeg/fin,
    even though it ain't designed for the Rio....
    Well, I got that, and tried to rig it to the stern,
    and, it sucked.

    Then, suddenly I lucked upon a perfect
    solution which turned out to be the following.
    The K79 skeg, fits perfectly into the electric motor
    mountings, from underneath,
    and can be kept in place by one
    7" long holding pin. It's a perfect solution
    in many ways.

    This changes the Rio, but also the Colorado,
    into a far superior tracking canoe instantly!
    It's probably true (I've ordered another fin),
    that one can have a fin either side
    and get even better tracking, however,
    one fin/skeg works superbly. I will video
    this and add a link later.

    I also got the electric trolling motor.
    And, the fin certainly adds stability
    when using the motor.
    The 12 volt motor is two speed,
    weighs 5lbs and provides a
    theoretical 12.5lbs thrust.

    What can I say about the motor
    except, it's awesome, I've got a
    a 20amp hour closed cell battery which
    fits in the back bum pouch of
    the seat and it will provide approx
    two hours continuous motoring
    at low speed, or maybe an hour solid
    of full speed. I was suprised how far
    this could take me away from the grid!

    The combination of the skeg/fin
    and the electric motor really enhance
    and expand the potential uses of the
    Rio canoe.

    When it comes to actually paddling,
    I'm using a single bladed canoe paddle
    and it feels good now that the tracking is
    acceptable.

    Negatives.

    I only dislike one design aspect of the Rio.
    The Boston valves are not as protected as
    they are on certain other inflateable canoes,
    even if there was a material strip like on the
    I-beam floor valve, this would enhance the
    durability under certain extreme conditions.

    Conclusion.

    The Rio, is a modern and sturdily
    designed inflatable, and, after
    a day up the creek you just deflate,
    throw it in the boot, move on,
    it's all good! In fact, it's very good.

    My rating 9.5/10
    ________________

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Hi again thought I'd attempt a follow up
    with a link to a demo wmv which I made
    to show how you can use a Tahiti k79 fin/skeg
    on a Sevylor Rio or Colorado inflateable.

    http://nstdvd.com/forager/videos/rio..._skeg_demo.wmv

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Alcester
    Posts
    249

    Default Skeg

    Hi
    Excellent video
    Do you use one skeg on the side when paddling, what effect does this have ?
    I haven't seen the skeg before, what's it made of ? Only on my tight budget I'm thinking make my own.
    I appreciate the info (keep it coming) as I'm hoping to get a Colorado soon.

    Zero
    Last edited by zero; 14th-July-2007 at 04:23 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Pocklington, East Yorkshire
    Posts
    5

    Default Thanks

    Many thanks for info about the Rio. I'm getting one delivered next week and it's my first canoe of any type - very excited!
    Anyone fancy Pocklington canal (East Yorks) next week?

    Ben

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    30

    Default

    I'm glad the video was ok for you guys,
    more will be coming fairly soon hopefully.

    Zero asks...

    Excellent video
    Do you use one skeg on the side when paddling, what effect does this have ?
    I haven't seen the skeg before, what's it made of ? Only on my tight budget I'm thinking make my own.
    I'm using one skeg mainly, and it makes a great difference
    when paddling either across currents
    or (heading/beating) against the wind.
    Also allows for more efficient operation
    of the trolling motor in most conditions.

    The Rio is lighter than a hard shell
    and is prone to being blown around by wind,
    the skeg/fin allows for operation in windier conditions
    without the dramas associated with not having
    a fin/skeg in such a craft.

    The fin itself is a fiberglass composite
    very sturdy and you can order easily
    from your Sevylor product supplier/retailer.
    (Remember, it's the fin used by the
    classic Sevylor k79 Tahiti model inflateable canoe.

    I suggest purchasing the proper K79 fin but,
    if you accept the concept to mount a fin using
    the trolling motor brackets, then, you quite possible
    can make a great custom skeg, as the
    mountings are already on the Canoe.


    Many thanks for info about the Rio. I'm getting one delivered next week and it's my first canoe of any type - very excited!
    I'm excited for you! Mine has already changed my lifestyle,
    tell us what you reckon post delivery and any questions
    you may have I can try and answer.
    (btw, you made a good decision to buy a Rio!)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Alcester
    Posts
    249

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by pete f View Post
    I suggest purchasing the proper K79 fin but,
    if you accept the concept to mount a fin using
    the trolling motor brackets, then, you quite possible
    can make a great custom skeg, as the
    mountings are already on the Canoe.
    Your right about buying the orginal, I've found the skeg on a suppliers web site and as its only £15 it is not worth the effort to make one.
    Any chance of a photo of the skeg in the mounting.
    My only reservations would be if the skeg struck anything hard it might damage the mounting points, but I suppose it would be a matter of judging the water conditions first.

    Zero

  8. #8

    Default Rio

    'Just thought I would add my own impressions of the Rio.

    I have been interested in (thought about) canoing for sometime but the initial cost and storage problems put me off until I happened across the Rio which just seemed to meet my needs on all counts.

    The canoe arrived in a surprisingly small box. Initial impressions weren't great to be honest. Things just seemed a bit cheap and crumpled at first and didn't shout quality. The other thing was the lack of good, clear instructions. I had never come across Boston valves before and a bit of info wouldn't have gone amiss. That said, once you get that sorted out you start to have some fun. It really is amazing to see this rather large (well it looks big in your living room anyway) and substantial canoe quickly appear as the crumpled material takes shape.

    Any thoughts of cheapness tend to disappear when you see the fully inflated boat. It really does look and feel like a very solid boat.

    The other thing is you have the option to fit an electric motor (around £99 I believe) which might be handy.

    Out on the water the first thing you notice is how safe the boat feels; absolutely stable with no hint of tippiness. Great if its your first boat. Also very comfy. My other half - who was a bit apprehensive- took to it straight away. 'Thought I was going to have to swim out to get my boat back off her.

    Handling wise I can't really comment too much as I hadn't paddled solo before but lets just say I spent the first half hour going round in circles (and very pleasant it was too) until I started to get the hang of it. I think the Rio is the same as any short, light boat in terms of tracking going by the review of the Old Town Pack which would probably have been my choice if I was going for a rigid boat. At the end of the day you just have to work on your technique I suppose.

    Summing up, I inflatables have their disadvantages compared to rigid hulls, but even if I do eventually get a rigid I will definitely also have an inflatable.

    9/10

    P.S. Two things I would buy if I was doing this again would be a pump with a built in pressure gauge and one of those take down paddles which can be used as one double bladed paddle or breaks down to two singles.
    Last edited by Acee; 30th-August-2007 at 06:29 PM.

  9. #9

    Default Inflatable Canoe

    Loved your write up on the Rio,How much legroom does it have and could it take much gear say for an overnight camp. I have recently got a small
    Coleman sport inflatable, but I am just on six feet tall and found it too short for comfort , after about an hour I was almost having cramp sitting in the one position Like you I thoroughly enjoyed my first trip out to an island on a local Loch. It took about half an hour to get there in the calm but about an hour to come back against the wind on the diagonal. It has two very small skegs one at the front and one at the stern, but it did not track like a solid canoe in spite of this Glad you are getting as much enjoyment from your Rio.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    30

    Default

    hi, the Rio has plenty of leg room and also the seating position
    is entirely adjustable.
    I can take enough gear to last a month off grid with my dog
    and have done so but, I did use an unsual seating position
    when doing so.
    Here is a shot where I was loaded for an overnight camp with the dog.


    regards
    pete f

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Posts
    167

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pete f View Post
    Hi again thought I'd attempt a follow up
    with a link to a demo wmv which I made
    to show how you can use a Tahiti k79 fin/skeg
    on a Sevylor Rio or Colorado inflateable.

    http://nstdvd.com/forager/videos/rio..._skeg_demo.wmv
    Exellent video, think that is my only reservations about the Colorado I have just bought sorted out!

  12. #12

    Default Review

    I have a Rio and it's excellent! I have tried it with both canoe and kayak paddles, and have found kayak paddles much easier to use as far as going in a straight line and speed are concerned - only downside is you get pretty wet.

    I have also tried using a K79 skeg attached to the motor mount as already mentioned (a chopstick also holds it in place nicely), but didn't find it made much difference in either calm or windy conditions. Having said that, the boat tracks nicely anyway. The seat is comfy once in the right position and their is plenty of space for luggage (I imagine you could easily fit enough in for a nights camping).

    It's quick to inflate, and easy to fold back up in the bag. I have found the best way to dry it out is by leaving it pumped up in the garden for a couple of hours, then mopping up any small puddles with an old towel.

    Here is a video of my rio.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2NgXS8ZeRM

  13. Default Sevylor Rio KCC305, another review

    I used to do a bit of canoeing years ago in the Scouts, and having recently moved to a new home near a large navigable river and a water park I thought I’d take it up again.

    My plan was to buy an inflatable that I could take on public transport, get a bus up-stream to various locations, and then canoe down-river towards home.

    After looking around at different options I decided on the Sevylor Rio, mainly on the grounds that it doesn’t cost and arm and a leg and it actually looks like a proper canoe, not a glorified beach toy.

    Price
    The Rio generally retails for £280-£290, but I found a supplier on eBay who is letting them go for £230 including delivery and a free bellows-type foot pump (these generally sell for around £10). If you have a friend coming back from the USA, try to convince them to bring one home with them, they seem to be around half the price in the States. I thought about buying one mail order from the USA, but they have to add VAT to the postage cost and this bumps the price up again.

    Kit
    The Rio arrived in a box 23 x 46 x 71cm. The kit includes: the canoe, a carryall, puncture repair kit, storage webbing that attaches to cargo ties in the bow, a Velcro-closing ‘net bag’ that clips to cargo ties in the stern, a bucket seat, a sort of ‘kit storage belt’ that clips behind the seat, and a pressure valve with two fittings. The box also contained the bellows pump, but this is not standard.

    Unpacking the Rio I was very pleased with the quality of the build. It appears to be very robust, and it’s an attractive, practical-looking craft with good lines. I got one in blue; the other colour option is green.

    Instructions
    My only major gripe is the poor instructions; you get two sides of A5 in English, but this is generic advice that applies to any Sevylor inflatable. It would have been good to have some decent diagrams that showed you how everything fitted together. A description of how the Boston valves work would also have saved some time. I even looked for a decent manual on the Sevylor website; there’s a page there devoted to manuals, but at the moment it’s empty.

    That said, it’s not too hard to figure out how it all fits together, and the pressure gauge has its own set of instructions.

    Bladders
    There are four bladders you have to inflate; two side bags, the floor bag and a smaller seat bag. The large sausage-shaped side bags have Boston valves, the two floor bags have regular ‘beach-ball type’ nozzles. Information on the pressure you should attain is printed on the side of the canoe (along with pithy safety advice in five languages). All the bladders should be inflated to 1.5 psi (100 mbar). As mentioned above, the kit includes a pressure gauge with two fittings; one for Boston valves, the other for nozzles.

    Pumps
    Using the bellows pump to inflate the bladders was both tiring and embarrassing. For some reason the pump makes a loud, high-pitched wheezing/farting sound when you use it on the side bags, and you have to pump for about five minutes before they noticeably start to inflate. To solve both problems I looked around for a small portable electric pump and discovered the ‘D4’. This pump is sold under various brand names, but the name always includes the D4 label (it takes four ‘D’ batteries). I found the pump for sale in my local outdoor store for around £12. On the offchance I checked Argos, and they had them for £8, and when I actually bought one I found they were on sale for £4! Four Duracell D batteries cost me around £6.

    Inflation
    The D4 is small (6 x 7 x 10 cm) and, with the batteries, it weighs in at 830g. It has all the nozzle adaptors you need, and once you’ve plugged in into a Boston valve you can switch it on and leave it to do its work while you sort out other stuff. The D4 is not very powerful and will not inflate the side bags to the correct pressure (you can hear the motor straining long before full inflation). I used the bellows pump to finish off the side bags and bring them up to pressure. (I discovered that keeping the bellows pump’s tubing as straight as possible helps keep the comedy noises to a minimum.) There’s no point in using the D4 to inflate the two floor bags as they’re relatively low volume.

    The Boston valves are very efficient, and inflating them and checking the pressure is painless. The nozzle valves are a different story; once inflated, it’s quite tricky to get the plug into the nozzle before much of the air has leaked out. It’s a knack that comes with practice (it helps to lubricate the plugs with water). For this reason I’ve never bothered to check the pressure of the inflated floor bags, I just pump them to firmness.

    Inflation/pressure adjustment takes around 15 mins, but with practise you could probably do it in 10.

    Fitting out
    Attaching the bucket seat is simple (but, again, instructions would have helped) as is fitting the various cargo devices. The seat has two Velcro strips to attach it to the seat bag and it secures to the side bags with four straps: two forward, two back. I do without the bow cargo net and the ‘belt thing’ that fits behind the seat, but the stern net bag is invaluable - it’s very roomy and secure and the perfect place to stow the pumps, carryall etc. There’s a hole in the floor at the bow that closes with a bung – I assume this is the ‘self bailing’ feature I saw mentioned somewhere.

    Fitting out takes less than 5 mins.

    Paddle
    I found a 'five-part' Sevylor paddle on an eBay store for around £20 including P&P. When it arrived I was disappointed – it looked like a piece of junk. There are two paddle heads, two aluminium paddle shafts and a middle piece that connects the two to make a kayak paddle. The various bits fit together using plastic screw clamps that don’t grip the aluminium very well and I was worried that the paddle heads would twist or fly off in the water. I was wrong, it all worked perfectly. And if the paddle looks cheap, that’s because it is cheap. But it does the job very well.

    On the water
    I’ve only taken the Rio out once so far, on a lake in our local water park. I was impressed. The Rio feels very sturdy and stable in the water, the bucket seat is very comfortable and I had plenty of legroom (I’m 5’8”, but even a six-footer should fit in easily. Handling was excellent, even in strong winds. If you sit there doing nothing you’ll turn in the wind very quickly, but once you start paddling and get under way the Rio will go where you want it to with relatively little effort. The canoe's underside has two stubby vanes running end to end down the middle, one vane is angled right, the other left. Whether these do much to stabilise the craft, I don’t know, but I have no complaints.

    Punctures!
    Having an inflatable makes you a bit paranoid about touching bottom in shallow water or getting close to banks that might hide submerged branches, but the Rio looks as if it could take a lot of punishment before it popped. The canoe’s cover is made of a thick nylon material and the bottom has an additional layer of thick black plastic. In case of damage, all the bladders can be removed through zip-closing openings in the canoe’s outer covering. It looks as if small holes or tears should be as easy to fix as a cycle puncture. In the case of long tears, burst seams or broken valves I imagine spare bladders are available (I’m going to look into it.)

    Stowing
    Finding the most efficient way of deflating and packing the canoe involved some experimentation (again, some instructions/suggestions would have helped). Using the bellows pump to completely deflate the floor bags makes a real difference as, unlike the side bags, these trap a lot of air if you just to try ‘roll’ the canoe flat. A well deflated Rio, properly folded (tuck the sides in) and rolled fits into the carryall with lots of room to spare. The seat also fits into the carryall, as does the net bag containing the pumps, pressure gauge, puncture repair kit etc. I even had room for my floatation jacket. When I got home I re-inflated the canoe to dry it out in the garden before stowing again. Mopping up the worst of the wet with a towel beforehand helps a lot. Tip – make sure you inflate the floor bags if you intend to prop the canoe up on its end to drain it, otherwise the bladders slip down inside their coverings and you have to spend a little time getting them back into position.

    All in all, an excellent buy that should last me many years.

  14. #14

    Default Sevylor Amazon/Ranger

    We bought one of each of these Sevylor inflatables a month ago. (they are the same boat, different colour). Tried them locally a couple of times before we went on holiday and had great fun.
    They were really easy to inflate and the pressure gauge (once I realised what it was came in very handy). I believe that one of the most common problems is overinflating and this makes sure that you do not do that.
    Anyway, took the canoed to France, namely the Ardeche. Wow. Has been about 20 years since I canoed here as a teenager. Still staggeringly beautiful. Arrived at about 7 am when it was still quiet. By 9am traffic on teh river was up and i could not believe how many canoes were out there! Down the rapids it could get a bit of a pain as there is always someone who wants to slip up the inside and cause havoc.
    Anyway, the 2 canoes we had were brilliant. they were stable and easy to manouevre. Even our 2 kids (age 8 and 10) could handle them on teh calm stretches.
    A few times we got caught on rocks but there was no damage as the canvas skin stopped any tears/punctures.
    At the end of a day on the river, we pulled the boats up, had a lie on the beach/rocks (we had to do this to let the canoe dry!) and then walked to the car, pulled out the plugs and popped them in the car.
    We had a fab time in these canoes. There was enough room for 1 adult and 1 child and a bag in each canoe. It was also very easy to get started and pack them away.
    The only logistical problem is finding a way to get your car to your destination point ready to come home. However, where there's a wll, there's a way. (We hired a bike!)
    Can't wait til next summer to do it again
    Gill

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    The benighted Isle of Wight
    Posts
    3

    Default Comparing the Rio with a K2 Explorer

    This seems a good place for my first post, in that I have a Sevylor Rio and used it recently for a three-and-a-bit-day paddle down the Severn. I’m a diehard tightwad, and some the most recent posts on the Gumotex Palava thread have fired me up. A grand? For an inflatable! When I bought the Rio, I got it for £200 new from an ebay dealer (grestini - recommended) and it was also on ebay I found a copy of the Sevylor SVX200 being sold under the brand of ‘K2 Explorer’. A chap in the midlands had imported a batch and was selling them - again for £200 - and because I’d already identified the SVX200 as a possible way I wanted to go, because they looked good, the detailing was interesting and the price was right, I bought one. My mate and I took the Rio and the K2 Explorer, paddled one boat each and swapped - I spent most of my time in the K2 Explorer, because hey, both boats are mine, and in any case I wanted to do a full assessment, to work out whether it was suitable for longer trips I have in mind. We’re both ex-kayakers, by the way, so forgive me for any ignorance on display on open-canoe matters.

    The story of the trip is for a different thread. Both boats performed well, and were suitable for this kind of exercise - downstream paddling, carrying enough gear for wild camping every night. We were permanently wet and mucky, of course (so we must have been enjoying ourselves) - wetsuits are a must when you’re kayak paddling in an open boat. A few critical points emerged from the trip which bear on the usefulness of the Rio.

    1) It’s easy to overinflate these boats, and the manometer supplied with the Rio was invaluable - it fitted the Boston valves of both boats, neither of which needed more than a a few puffs each morning.

    2) The Rio is a shorter, beamier boat, with a lower carrying capacity, and is slower. It has an inner raised (inflatable) seat platform, which is a significant advantage. In the Explorer (and reportedly in the SVX200) you paddle with your bum in water, as a puddle from the paddle trickle-off soon forms. I used a foam pool float under the seat to minimise this: next trip, I shall duct-tape 2 or maybe 3 floats together.

    3) We didn’t get far enough to take the boats down the Jackfield rapids at Ironbridge (this is where we shall resume the trip), but we found them both to be exceptionally stable, and would expect no problems even fully loaded.

    4) Wet and cold apart, the comfort level was high, with back-supported seats in both boats. I have no basis to compare with paddling while kneeling, and would be interested in hearing from people who do both.

    5) We did not use skegs on either boat (the Severn shoals at several points) and found that we could keep them on track by paddling appropriately, even in the face of a stiff breeze across the long reaches at Buildwas.

    We’re building up to a long (150+ kilometre) paddle down the Loire next spring, and at the moment we see no reason why these boats won’t do it. If anyone is interested in more info on the K2 Explorer, or pictures, I can oblige.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    LANCASHIRE
    Posts
    99

    Default sevylor rio 305

    great little craft with a big heart,had many adventures in these truly portable canoes,on all but the roughest of water,loved every minute,never felt in any danger,can get blown around a bit on open rough water,but then i never used a rudder,we carried a huge amount of gear 25 stone each,(in equipment)amazing,always wear a life jacket,for the price and the opportunities to be had for so little money!!we took a gamble on these craft before reading anything at the time,mainly out of desperation to get afloat in scotland and we never looked back,theyve been sold, and ive recently added another to my arsenal,great all round ,cheap fun,

  17. #17

    Default hi all,

    HI all,

    just brought the Rio, and it arrived yesterday, managed to get it out of the box, but it was too cold tonight and the light was fading so I just checked to see if I could see any damage before putting it back in its bag.

    the instructions are terrible and I cant really see how to inflate it with these valves and the pump, but will hopefully work it out once I see it in good daylight.

    How do you use the pressure guage that come with it, do you inflate then insert the gauge as I cant see how the pump and gauge can go in at the same time.

    Does anyone know of some better instructions / video that are online to help a complete novice?

    now just waiting for the warmer weather to try it out properly.

    Pete

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    LANCASHIRE
    Posts
    99

    Thumbs up rio inflation

    hi fella, its been a while since i used the gauges, inflate untill the tubes look full then insert the gauge and check the reading,you can always add or lose a little air if needed. i used the double handled pump, and counted the strokes on the tube, then the bottom then the seat pillow effigy,i used this as a guide then after,it was 24/24 - 14/ 7/DO NOT COPY,This is an example only.please dont take this as all pumps are different,but once you have got the pressure right, remember the pumps, check the gauge and your away, then every time after simply inflate whilst counting and go,i had to do this as i soon lost the gauge so my buddy borrowed me his one night i set it out in the living room checked it out all was well ,, i never had a problem after, hope this is usefull to you , a thing to remember though being winter and air pressure will be low so check first , and dont forget to do your own counting,!!!just in case you lose the bits, all together these are great little craft ,ive had all my children on mine at once, 3 girls,and me the only thing that took a bashing was my ears,but it made a change someone else doing the paddling, i had some photos from scotland on a website but all is lost, let us all know how you get on, all the best ,

  19. #19

    Default

    Thanks for the quick reply and good tips, Im really looking forward to trying it out.

    Hopefully the weather will be kind to me in a few days and I can finally get the kayak inflated and work out how it all goes together.

    happy kayaking

    Pete

  20. #20

    Default

    HI Guys,

    whats the best way to roll / fold the Rio so you can put it back in the carry bag.

    the manual says to just fold in the sizes and then roll it from the far end but after doing that its a very tight fit in the bag without room for the other bits.

    Pete

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    LANCASHIRE
    Posts
    99

    Default In the bag

    I found when deflated use the pump / if you ve got the inflate deflate double pump/ use the pump to suck the remainding air out, then fold the sides in, get it as uniform as poss, then roll the end furthest from the valves,you should find you have a bit of room to get the bits in too, have you tried getting one back into the box?!!!if you manage it ,give your self a ceegar. i reckon theyre packed in a decompression chamber, saying that like anything else that comes snugly packed,they never quite go in how they should,someone should ////you tube ///the correct method,, the method i mentioned before worked well enough though,i would reccomend getting a double pump from , i think its lidl /aldi, my pal called around with one after i paid twice as much from a well known canoe shop in manchester, the lidl pump had snug round handles which were a revelation in comparison to the more expensive harsh square profiled handles,hope this has been of help to someone,all the best
    Last edited by skoper; 4th-December-2008 at 11:02 PM. Reason: my dodgy spelling !!

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Somewhere Near Worcs
    Posts
    453
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    I have a Colorado (the double version of the Rio) and can give the following tips :


    • Get the pump adaptor for the floor valve and put that in the base without connecting the pump. This will open the valve without you having to pinch it open. You can also use the small adapter for the pressure gauge. This will save you a lot of time
    • After air stops noticably coming out of the base you can connect it up to the deflate side of your pump and then pump the remaining air out of the base.
    • Before you start packing the boat away reinsert the pump adaptor into the base, this keeps the valve open allowing any trapped air to escape when packing away.

    On the Colorado I fold it so the first fold is about two inches or so into the first bottom skeg and fold the sides in to the seat width and continue. Remember to take the pump adaptor out before you fold over it. The bag on the Colorado is a close fit at the best of times but kneeling on it as you are folding does help and also try to keep it together when putting it in the bag and don't let it expand. A wet boat will also be more of a pain to get into the bag than a dry boat.

    Hope some of this helps

  23. #23

    Default Skeg fitted as standard

    Hi Guys, yes im a newbie here, i dont even own an inflatable yet as i was at the research stage.
    I had decided on a Rio (in original green) and have been following this thread regard fitment of adapted skegs.

    Now, it is no news to see that now there is a new 2009 colorado in a new 'teal gren/ble' colour...which i dont personally like but it does still have the directional strakes as before but the selling point now is it comes fitted with a removable skeg!!!...awesome he shouts...except that was the colorado and every dealer i contacted told me there is no new version or planned version of the rio with the skeg or new colours etc etc..

    But then i spotted this?
    ( missing due to my non existent post count)

    Which clearly is a rio in the 'old' blue colour with a skeg?

    i contacted them who then contacted sevylor who tell me that all rio's and colorado's from 2008 (not 2009) onward have the red removable skeg?!!! im just trying to clarify now that i can get a new version rio with skeg but in the oldschool and lovely green...not the new colour teal?

    Ill keep you posted and i appologise now if this is old news for you all...i told you im a newbie here?

    Dan

  24. #24

    Default

    Blimey i had dinner then after about 5 failed attempts (having to wait for 15 mins after every 5) i finally got back in with a new password...think i hadnt verified or somthing

    Anyway im using this waffle to clock up another post so i can post the link from previous....clever me!

  25. #25

  26. #26

    Default

    Ok the dealer has confirmed this is a rio in old style green with new skeg! sweet, i shall be ordering one soon

  27. #27

    Default rio

    hope you get sorted with your canoe and happy paddling its an addictive sport

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,167

    Default

    I have an '08 blue Sevylor & it definitely has a red detachable skeg. Until I lose it...

  29. #29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    I have an '08 blue Sevylor & it definitely has a red detachable skeg. Until I lose it...

    Ha ha yes, i am hoping they sell it as a spare/replacement.

    I think many many dealers are missing a trick though not advertising (or maybe unaware) that rio's also now have the skeg, ..well actually dealers wont care as people may just decide to buy a back country instead or something but Sevylor should really update their dealers to point out that rio and colorado both have skegs now!....tut tut...andNOT just the new colorado (which if you dont like the colour may make you turn to another model or make)

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,167

    Default

    I should never have opened my mouth about losing the skeg. Removing it last night after a quick paddle, its not the skeg I'm losing, its the mount coming off....

    Try not to drag your Sevylor over the edge of canals too much without lifting the skeg clear!

  31. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    I should never have opened my mouth about losing the skeg. Removing it last night after a quick paddle, its not the skeg I'm losing, its the mount coming off....

    Try not to drag your Sevylor over the edge of canals too much without lifting the skeg clear!
    Ooh thanks for the tip, i shall try and remember not do do something so utterly stupid! (kidding )

    EDIT: im pretty sure all these places sell repair glue and mending stuff for that kind of thing?

  32. #32

    Default

    Ok...i have recieved my 2009 Rio package in green and its awesome!

    I just have a couple of questions?

    I had a pretty smooth first run at set up and worked pretty much most things without needing the dire destructions.

    However, my 'package' came with an electric (cig lighter) type pump....which i have used on all bladders...and they look and feel pretty full up.

    However, after grappling with and finally working out the manometer (guage) thing...(am i right in thinking the metal pin somehow pushes through the little circles??????)....well, when i test the pressures...although my pump seems to get to a point where its not putting more air in, the test says i only have about 50 millibar (needs 100)?

    Are these little pumps not man enough and should i also buy a bellows or stirrup pump to top up to the max pressure?...i also agree about how dam fiddly the beach ball type floor valves are!, i worked out to lubricate but even so by the time you get the dam thing in all your lovely air pressure is lost!...i need to re think this.

    At 50 millibar all round the boat looks and feels good...but on water would i just sink?...in my head doing the math it means i need double the air in the sides than i already have but looking at them i dont think twice as much air could fit? ha ha....

    Or are the guages tricky to use and im not getting it quite right...ill be honest...without adding air...sometimes when i got the guage in it read pretty good...and over 50...then the next try...under 50....then again even more over 50...how far 'in' do you push the thing im terrified of just puncturing or bursting something as its quite hard to 'feel' when the pin has located a hole if you know what i mean?


    Either way, so far the thing looks awesome and a proper bit of kit...its currently inflated in the lounge!....

    reading a previous review in this thread...i seem to have the mesh storage compartment bag that goes 'behind' the seat, but i saw mention of a bag that goes up front?...i dont have this so maybe the new models have got rid?...i do have the red skeg though.....and lastly....my Rio is in two different shades of olive green...one lighter one darker which alternates between inner and outer..but infact from one side the rio is light olive and from the other side the rio is dark olive...not sure if its right or a fault but looks pretty!

    How do i upload pics here?

    Sorry for such a long ramble...cant wait to test the boat over this bank holiday weekend!

  33. #33

    Default

    Hi Dan
    I also have a little re-chargeable air pump and no they are not powerful enough to get the pressure you need, I always had to finish off with a stirrup pump.
    Though you do need the knack with the manometer to get the pressure right, never over inflate or the bladders will go at the seems. You will not sink if you have under inflated but you could be a bit lobsided.
    Alan

  34. #34

    Default

    Cheers matey..

    yes it would only get them to 50 bar...so i went and bought a 5 litre bellows and within about 5 pumps (on the already 50 millibar pressure) i was way over 100!!...jesus that doesnt take long so i let air out and then got all remaining bladders up to the correct 100 millibar....which made the whole boot look and feel awesome.

    Im worried now that as i went way over on one bladder (before very quickly testing and releasing air) i may have ruined it but it seems perfectly ok so far?...would a one off do much damage....

    I have seen online that 'stearns' do a foot belows with built in pressure gauge, i think this may be the answer...just worried the fitments/valves may be different to sevylor stuff does anyone know?

  35. #35

    Default

    anyone got any tips on how to use the pressure guage that comes with the rio, so far myself and 3 other people have tried it without success.

    Fingers crossed my rio will be on water for the first time next saturday, cant wait.

    Pete

  36. #36

    Default

    Honestly mate it took me for ever to work it out and its fiddly and rather scary.

    You have to thread on the adapter (longest pin for side pods, smallest pin for floor and seat)...

    So...you have the largest longest pin one on....you undo the screw lid of the boston valve.....now if you shine in a torch you can see a ring of small circles.....?...the scary part is this:

    You then kind of slot the adapter/guage into the boston valve and gently turn it until you feel the pin locate any of these circles (not easy and takes a light touch)...then...unless im mistaken you kind of push it in hard...forcing it i presume to break through a circle and take the pressure when i then presume self seals in a non return way when the pin is then removed?....its a bit touch and go as i have got various readings when re trying without actually changing any pressure but i was only at 50 millibar.

    When i finally got a decent footpump today and got the thing up to the proper 100 millibar the use of the guage was a lot better and seemed more accurate.

    Either way i cannot be doing with the fiddling about of connecting pump..then guage...then pump then guage and am looking at the stearns bellows pump with built in guage until someone on here tells me otherwise?...hope this helps..

    im 'hoping' for my maiden voyage tomorrow if all goes to plan!

    Edit: also...with regard my previous posts and other members posts...i found the floor and seat beach ball type valves almost impossible to retrieve from their hole...then get the lids off and then inflate and get the lids back on before all the air escaped....however something changed today and once my craft was all up to full pressure then valves when opened were still closed...so, like other products they must have modern non return valeves on that only release air when squeezed, but i have no idea why they would not work like this for me for the whole of yesterday? maybe they dont function at half pressure (50 millibar) but do at full pressure which is a bit of a pain but now i have my pump situation sorted i will always inflate straight to full pressure...but yes the non return valve worked fine then and fitting the lid back in was easy.yaya!
    Last edited by KentishDan; 3rd-May-2009 at 09:26 PM.

  37. #37

    Default Pete finally gets on the water

    Hi all,

    last weekend thanks to my good friend George I had my first go at Kayaking.

    Its been almost a year since I found out that my good friend George had taken up kayaking and I decided that as I had done it a few times years ago and enjoyed it, that it would be a good sport for me to do.

    I have been trying to find a sport which would help me to get fit and lose weight, but which did not put stress on my knees and kayaking seems to fit the bill.

    So with Georges help over the winter months I slowly brought myself a “RIO” inflatable Kayak.

    I then also started to get the various bits needed to canoe safely, including a buoyency aid, paddles, various pumps and dry bags to keep my stuff dry.

    Before I can go on the rivers and lakes George sugguested that I try a pool session to try out the kayak, this sounded like a good idea and so waited for the next session.

    Unfortunately I missed my first scheduled session as my knee again decided again to play up and gave way a few days before. But finally on last Saturday myself and my kayak got to go on the water.

    I was really nervous at first, but after a few minutes I was helped into the kayak and started trying to paddle the boat around the pool. At first I had a hard time getting the kayak to go straight, but soon I started to get the knack and got more confident with my paddleing.

    For the next 2 hours I had a lot of fun learning how to control the boat and finding out how to get in and out whilst in the water, as well as getting a lot of advice from George and the other people in the group.
    A few of the more experienced kayak’ers asked how stable my kayak was, and then for about 30mins a few of them tried very hard to get the boat to roll.

    The end result was that they found my boat to be a lot of fun and very hard to capsize / roll which is what I really wanted.

    I now hope in the next few weeks to go onto one of the clubs local rivers and try it out for real. I am also hoping to take along a few of my waterproof cameras so hopefully I will soon be able to take some interesting photos from the river.

    Thanks also to everyone here for all your helpfull advice and support. now cant wait to get it on the river and try it for real.

    happy kayaking

    Pete

  38. #38

    Smile

    the Rio now comes with the skeg as standard
    make sure that you enquire with the dealer that the boat is the one with the skeg. Sevylor have also uprated the capacity from 100-150kg
    best price for the latest models can be found at 'solelymarine'
    Took mine to mile end mill on sunday and had hours of fun in the bottom hole

  39. #39
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Didcot (Oxfordshire, England)
    Posts
    19

    Default rio vs colorado vs hudson

    Hi, apologies in advance to those that must be getting bored of reading my questions about this in other threads. I am a complete novice and about to order a Sevylor Hudson, since it seems to have more capacity than the Colorado (it must carry my wife, myself, our dog and some gear). However I see such rave opinions of the Colorado and Rio that I am a bit concerned that perhaps it would be worth cramming ourselves into a Colorado. Do you reckon the lack of information on the Hudson simply reflects the fact that it is a newer model, or does it lack that "something" that makes the Rio/Colorado a "classic"? One of the main differences (apart from size) seems to be that the Hudson is slightly narrower (89cm vs 118cm, I seem to recall). Any one out there who has experience of paddling both the Colorado and the Hudson? Thanks in advance. Best, Jorge

  40. Default best paddle for rio?

    Hi, I'm going to buy a Rio tomorrow. What paddle does everyone use - a double kayak type or a single paddle?
    cheers

  41. #41

    Default

    If your getting the skegless model you may need a double kayak paddle of at least 2.3m if its the extra skeg model then you should be ok (after practice) with a single see 'solelymarine' for the Rio 305hf @ £220 delivered

  42. Default bags

    What size rucksack would I need to put it in. I'm planning to take it to France by train and need to carry it and my gear on my back. Is that feasible?
    cheers

  43. #43

    Default rio sevlylor

    Help
    can anyone tell me the best way to get air into the floor and seat on the rio sevlylor

  44. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    near wolverhampton
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Not sure what you mean stuart, do you have the correct valve fitting? what pump are you using? have you managed to inflate the sides ok ?



    BRY

  45. #45

    Default Pumping up seats

    Stuart1 - I have a colorado and have always used a bog standard stirrup pump which has a couple of adaptors on for such things as air beds for camping, and one of the adaptors goes into the seat inflation point fine. Also with stirrup pump you wont suffer with deflation after a period of time of the bladders.

    Ittakestwo

  46. #46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stuart1 View Post
    Help
    can anyone tell me the best way to get air into the floor and seat on the rio sevlylor
    You may find that the valves are tucked away under little velcro flaps. They are different to the valves on the side (well they are on the Hudson)

  47. #47

    Default

    You need to use a long valve adaptor on the pump with the tip cut at an angle so that air can come out of the side instead of the tip - when you push the adaptor right into the valve a small slit opens. If you then turn the adaptor so that the open side of the adaptor is opposite the slit pumping becomes easy because the air is not restricted as it is pumped in.

    If you withdraw the adaptor before it's up to the required pressure air will come out. When there is plenty of pressure the slit automatically closes.

    You need to look hard at the valve on the canoe to see the slit unless you've pushed it open with the adaptor.

  48. #48

    Default Comparing the Rio with the K2 explorer

    Hi,

    I saw michelinman has both the RIO and the K2 Explorer.

    Which do you believe is the better more durable boat? I will be using it in a bay with small waves and for river paddling.

    Thanks so much for any advice.

    Corinne

  49. #49

    Default

    hey,

    Been paddling the rio for a few months now and i'm really impressed with it. Although i've never been able to get the pressure gauge to work, have tried everything lol
    Considering adding thigh straps atm , would be nice to have that little extra control. Dont suppose anyone else has tried this have they? I'm thinking the hardest part will be working out how/wear to attach them.

    Cheers,
    Alex
    Last edited by albroxs; 23rd-March-2010 at 02:53 PM.

  50. #50

    Default

    when testing the sides for pressure you need to rotate the pin so that it locates in the hole of the boston valve it may simply be that you have not inflated it enough to register as the Differance for not registering and being over inflated is only about 6 pumps

    not considered the thigh straps played in a few stoppers and not needed them even with the boat filling to overflowing whilst stuck

    theres also a danger of entanglement that you may wish to consider

    solelymarine stock a bravo inline gauge if thats of any interest

  51. #51

    Default

    thanks for the advice I'll try the pressure gauge again at the weekend. If not i'll just buy a pump that already has one.

  52. Default Hey Ho New to this site

    Looking at the threads latest 2009.; anybody wanna talk about skegs for the Colorado cos I have a solution without using the sbm mount or two give me a shout!! on the forum

    Regards

  53. Default

    need help with my sevy:

    hello everyone, my sevylor colorado's bottom chamber collapsed and everytime I repair it a new leak opens up. It is clearly because the PVC deteriorated because of usage (4 years and less than 20 times) and there's no way to find a spare part. My canoe is therefore useless.

    I tried with coleman (now owner of sevylor) and they said there's no spare part for me available...so I don't know what to do at this point.

    Can anyone help? Maybe there's still someone selling these parts?

    Thanks
    Cris

  54. Default Pvc

    Quote Originally Posted by cristianx View Post
    need help with my sevy:

    hello everyone, my sevylor colorado's bottom chamber collapsed and everytime I repair it a new leak opens up. It is clearly because the PVC deteriorated because of usage (4 years and less than 20 times) and there's no way to find a spare part. My canoe is therefore useless.

    I tried with coleman (now owner of sevylor) and they said there's no spare part for me available...so I don't know what to do at this point.

    Can anyone help? Maybe there's still someone selling these parts?

    Thanks
    Cris
    Hi Cristianx
    My First thoughts on this, is ebay you might get lucky there! I apologise if you've already thought of that and I'm teaching granny to suck eggs, but, your problem seems a bit weird. PVC does not just fall apart like you have described, where do you canoe? is there sand? and do you make sure that all the zippz are closed. The only other thing i can think of, is over inflation and in hot weather with sand being a contributary factor. But all that aside, if Coleman cant offer a spare part! there must be something wrong. Personally I would put the biggest rocket I could find up there backside, they have to be able to support the product, if they cannot WE ARE DOOMED!! to a life of glue and patches if all our Colorado's go the same way.
    Regards
    Gareth

  55. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amphibian View Post
    Hi Cristianx
    My First thoughts on this, is ebay you might get lucky there! I apologise if you've already thought of that and I'm teaching granny to suck eggs, but, your problem seems a bit weird. PVC does not just fall apart like you have described, where do you canoe? is there sand? and do you make sure that all the zippz are closed. The only other thing i can think of, is over inflation and in hot weather with sand being a contributary factor. But all that aside, if Coleman cant offer a spare part! there must be something wrong. Personally I would put the biggest rocket I could find up there backside, they have to be able to support the product, if they cannot WE ARE DOOMED!! to a life of glue and patches if all our Colorado's go the same way.
    Regards
    Gareth
    Hi Gareth, no sand at all I use it in a river. A person who works PVC told me that there's a problem with the material, in fact it opens up everytime I inflate it after a repair!

    As per Coleman this is what I received from them:
    The last few years have been frustrating. Sevylor has been sold 4 times in the last 5 years. First it was made an independent company from Zodiac, then it was sold to the Chinese manufacturer of the product. They sold it to Stearns, which was then bought out by Coleman. Each time there were changes in the product line as management's views were different at each company.

    Under Coleman, most spare parts have disappeared. I will double check the warehouse to see if we have anything for you, but I don't think so. I'll let you know what I discover.
    Anyway thanks for your nice reply, I already set up a search on eBay not to avail so far...

  56. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amphibian View Post
    Hi Cristianx
    My First thoughts on this, is ebay you might get lucky there! I apologise if you've already thought of that and I'm teaching granny to suck eggs, but, your problem seems a bit weird. PVC does not just fall apart like you have described, where do you canoe? is there sand? and do you make sure that all the zippz are closed. The only other thing i can think of, is over inflation and in hot weather with sand being a contributary factor. But all that aside, if Coleman cant offer a spare part! there must be something wrong. Personally I would put the biggest rocket I could find up there backside, they have to be able to support the product, if they cannot WE ARE DOOMED!! to a life of glue and patches if all our Colorado's go the same way.
    Regards
    Gareth
    Hi Gareth, no sand at all I use it in a river. A person who works PVC told me that there's a problem with the material, in fact it opens up everytime I inflate it after a repair!

    As per Coleman this is what I received from them:
    The last few years have been frustrating. Sevylor has been sold 4 times in the last 5 years. First it was made an independent company from Zodiac, then it was sold to the Chinese manufacturer of the product. They sold it to Stearns, which was then bought out by Coleman. Each time there were changes in the product line as management's views were different at each company.

    Under Coleman, most spare parts have disappeared. I will double check the warehouse to see if we have anything for you, but I don't think so. I'll let you know what I discover.
    Anyway thanks for your nice reply, I already set up a search on eBay to no avail so far...

  57. #57

    Default Hudson or colarado

    Hello

    I was thinking of buying a seveylor colarado, but have seen the hudson - has any one experience of the hudson, is it as versatile, strong etc. I have a lot of experience in open boats and kayaks so will probably abuse either a bit, take too much kit and go where I shouldn't!!
    Any advice - the hudson looks a bit bigger and a few less things to clip onto, can't find info on footrests, carrying handles and things like that (or if you can just use 1 or 2 seats?
    Thank you fellow water lovers

  58. #58
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Didcot (Oxfordshire, England)
    Posts
    19

    Default hudson

    Quote Originally Posted by StevieB View Post
    Hello

    I was thinking of buying a seveylor colarado, but have seen the hudson - has any one experience of the hudson, is it as versatile, strong etc. I have a lot of experience in open boats and kayaks so will probably abuse either a bit, take too much kit and go where I shouldn't!!
    Any advice - the hudson looks a bit bigger and a few less things to clip onto, can't find info on footrests, carrying handles and things like that (or if you can just use 1 or 2 seats?
    Thank you fellow water lovers
    Hi SetvieB,

    I have owned a Hudson for a little over a year. I have used it a few times and I am very happy with it. I cannot advise you on how tough it is since I always used it in the Oxford Canal (in Oxfrodshire, southern England), where there's not even a current - so it is as safe as it can get (I am definitely a beginner). I have always paddled it canoe-style i.e. I have no experience of how it responds when you padle it as a kayak. I have always used it with two people in. In this way I find it very easy to paddle. I imagine that wiht only one person it may be more difficult to make it move in a straight line.

    There are three seats, all of them adjustable and removable, so you can use it with one, two or three seats on. You can regulate the position of the seats along the length of the boat. The back rests have straps that allow you to adjust them so they are vertical and firm. I find that extremely comfortable. There are no footrests. The seats are a bit elevated with respect to the bottom of the canoe (the bottom of each sit is an independent inflatable cushion). There are four handles: one at the front, one at the back, and two in the middle on either side. In addition, on the sides of the canoe, on the outside, there are four velcro rings (two on each side) used to secure the paddles to the sides of the canoe. I have never used them that way since I don't see the point of doing that - except, I imagine, during a long portage, where you may want to put the canoe on your head. I imagine that a better use of those velcro rings might be to tie things up, but I have never used them that way either - I have never carried a lot of stuff in - just the canoe's gear (pump, etc.) plus a picnic bag.

    The Hudson weighs 15 kg, which I think is very convenient. The Colorado weighs 18, I believe. The bag is very good: tough, yet lightweight, and crucially the canoe fits comfortably insdie, which means you don't have to get the folding perfect so you pack it away in no time.

    In my experience it is very stable in the water - but then again I have only used it in a canal.

    With two people in it, there is quite a bit of space under the protective covers at the bow and stern. The cover is not perfectly tight, so you can put a bulky eitem underneath and it will stretch up.

    I have no experience of the COlorado. When I bought mine in Reading they showed me both, inflated, side-by-side, and we went for the Hudson because it is a bit longer, so there would be easy to fit in our dog in addition to us. But the Colorado looks very good too. By the way you may be wonder why the Hudson is lighter. The reason is that the colorado is wider. I don't know if that may be better for the kind of more extreme activity that you are planning. As I said, I have the impression that the HUdson is very stable.

    Good luck.

  59. #59

    Default hudson or colarado

    Thanks Joquti

    A few good useful points - being longer will mean tracking is better

    StevieB

  60. #60

    Default

    Hello, just had my Colorado out on Ullswater and Derwentwater for the second year, but have had punctures, I think through over inflation - it doesn't take much, does it? and I have run out of glue. Am I right to think I need uPVC cement and uPVC patches? The repairs I made seemed to be successful but I think I used patches that were too small - I was at the lakeside and didn't have any knife, only teeth and twice another puncture popped up near the previous one. So any info on what is the best (and correct) repair cenment and patches and any other tips on fixing would be very welcome.

    Thanks

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