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Thread: PakCanoe 170

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    260

    Default PakCanoe 170

    Maker's Spec

    Max Width: 38” / 96cm
    Gunwale Width: 36” / 91cm
    Depth: 14” / 36cm
    Weight: 56lb / 25.5kg
    Length: 17’ / 520cm
    Capacity: 910lb / 415kg

    Maker's Write Up
    PakCanoe 170 is the wilderness work horse. It will carry enough gear for a full scale expedition and is the best alternative in shallow water situations.
    Last edited by Canoe Guru; 8th-March-2007 at 08:33 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Oslo, Norway.
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Bought one today for a trip here in Norway planned for the first week in July. Will post some photos if I make it back.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Oslo, Norway.
    Posts
    10

    Default Putting it together.

    My Pakcanoe 170 arrived in the post last week so yesterday afternoon in the basement at work I decided on a dry run putting it together.





    I swept the dust away and rolled it out...





    Then out come all the rods and stems etc. Anyone know why I had 3 of the smallest cross ribs? Do they usually supply a spare?





    After connecting all the rods together, first thing to do is slide the gunwhale rods down their sleeve. Easier said than done. It was a constant case of moving the rod until it reached a support stem hole (where it would get stuck) then walking back to it, rejiggling it, then sliding it to the next hole. This job would be MUCH easier with two. I wasn't rushing but in all honesty each gunwhale took me about 15 minutes.





    Next came the gunwhale 'terminators'. One end went on very easily, getting inside the canoe and pushing the gunwhales out with my thighs but the other end took a while going from this where the terminator sits outside the skin...





    to this where it sits snugly inside...





    Next in was the keel, very straightforward...




    Next came the 2 sets of chine rods. These also go in very easily as long as you arch them in the AIR first and then slide them down into the boat. I first tried arching the outer ones (not visible in photo) inside the skin of the boat and this proved impossible.





    Then came the cross ribs which are a bit fiddly putting in alone. An extra pair of hands would make it easier. I did swear a lot doing this bit. In fact, I swore a lot of the time. The seats are a clever little design and they went on with ease, the icing on the cake...





    Finally, the finished article...





    I've read on here that some people can put these together alone in about 40 minutes. I also think with a bit of practice and familiarity that it's certainly possible. My personal best so far after this attempt is 2 hours! But I didn't rush!!! I have a trip planned for a couple of weeks and then I'll have some help and I think an hour tops.

    Hope this helps anyone else before their first build. It certainly looks fine and feels sturdy and I can't wait to get it wet.
    Last edited by gravo; 22nd-June-2008 at 04:05 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sault Ste. Marie, MI, USA
    Posts
    137

    Default

    I, too, take about two hours to put my boat together. I've only put it together twice, and both times took about two hours, and required a follow-up nap.

    Thanks for the pictures. I hope you have a great time on your trip, and share some pictures of that, too!

    Pringles

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Posts
    3,991

    Default

    great illustration of the assembly process.

    2hrs for the first time putting it together is perfectly normal. i think it took me more like 3 but that's because i was constantly being distracted and not in a hurry.
    i only got 2 of those smallest cross ribs with mine so maybe you just got lucky.

    have a great trip, and enjoy the boat!

  6. #6

    Default Just got one

    I just bought a pak-canoe, but have used them for a couple of river trips in the past. I love them, and hate them both.

    Here is my experience

    - they are far tougher than they look, and tougher than most would expect. We ran a few shallow rock gardens, and while those first generation seats popped out and occasionally a piece would work itself loose, there really wasn't any significant damage.

    - They take big waves better than a similarly sized hardshell boat. They are able to flex a bit, and float over a huge wave train rather than knifing into it.

    - They have what the manufacturer calls "adjustable rocker" which means that if you load one up for a trip, it behaves something like a 17' Penobscot on the flats. However, if you paddle one empty, it seems just a bit hogged, and if you paddle one empty, with both paddlers kneeling in the middle, or a solo paddler, it has more rocker, so it handles a bit more like a Dagger Impulse. As it is meant as an expedition boat, and usually paddled with a load, this really isn't an issue.

    - They are flexible, so while durable and seaworthy, if you like to handle your boat with crisp leans/edging you should probably spend some time learning this one. First of all, with the floor being soft, leaning doesn't directly transfer to the boat. Secondly, when it does, the boat will actually torque a bit if both partners aren't leaning the same way.

    I bought one because on balance they are a fine canoe, but they are not an exact match for the handling characteristics of a hard boat.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

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    Six inch electrical cable ties are your friend. At every junction of longtidinal and cross bars make an x with two cable ties. Also the seats! Don't ask how I know..

    The hulls can twist if one pressures a side and the other paddler does not with a dump probable in whitewater. Act as a team.

    They do exhibit a hogged bottom paddled tandem empty. They will always be a disappointment in handling unless a load is included. Tandems were designed to be paddled with gear in the middle.

    They handle water more like a raft.

    I got one for flying with it. We are doing a trip several thousand miles away and freighting the canoe is an astronomical expense. Carrying a 55 lb bag with canoe in it is less so.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  8. #8

    Default Seats

    I have the wood seats on this one, and they do look like an improvement. Here is an article written by fellow Manitoban Brian Johnson: http://www.lssd.ca/~bjohnston/FOV1-0...df?Plugin=Loft

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr_canoehead View Post
    I have the wood seats on this one, and they do look like an improvement. Here is an article written by fellow Manitoban Brian Johnson: http://www.lssd.ca/~bjohnston/FOV1-0...df?Plugin=Loft
    I wish my memory were better. Talked to Alv just last March about those seats and came away with the conclusion that we were better served keeping the foam ones. Have no idea why except I do remember it was easier to trim as they were moveable.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Amsterdam, Netherlands
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowcanoe View Post
    Six inch electrical cable ties are your friend. At every junction of longtidinal and cross bars make an x with two cable ties. Also the seats! Don't ask how I know..
    yes that's the way to go. i leave reusable cable ties (the ones that you can unlock and open after tying) on the rods all the time so that they are ready to be attached after each assembly.

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowcanoe View Post
    I wish my memory were better. Talked to Alv just last March about those seats and came away with the conclusion that we were better served keeping the foam ones. Have no idea why except I do remember it was easier to trim as they were moveable.
    i have been eyeing those bench seats with interest, too... they look good and may be more stable than the tractor seats, and probably increase the rigidity of the hull somewhat.
    their position is also adjustable to some degree lengthwise in the canoe, and definitely in terms of height. when i asked alv if i can fit one of them in the middle of my 165 for solo paddling he said it would need some modifications.

    therefore i think they have a certain amount of leeway to be moved back and forward from their intended bow or stern position but can't be fitted further in the middle without a bit of customisation.

    by the way, what do you mean by 'foam seats'? i don't think i know them?

  11. #11
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    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
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    Foam seats=tractor seats. Though you can really kneel around them. Once you get the hang of keeping them put.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  12. #12
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowcanoe View Post
    Foam seats=tractor seats. Though you can really kneel around them. Once you get the hang of keeping them put.
    thanks. yes, that's the ones i am using now. i was considering the newer bench type seats as they look like they would make it easier to move closer to one gunwhale when soloing.
    i haven't found anyone or any place (dealer) over here who has them so might just have to order one to find out.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    London
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    420

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    Quote Originally Posted by gravo View Post
    I've read on here that some people can put these together alone in about 40 minutes. I also think with a bit of practice and familiarity that it's certainly possible. My personal best so far after this attempt is 2 hours! But I didn't rush!!! I have a trip planned for a couple of weeks and then I'll have some help and I think an hour tops.
    I can put my 160 together in about 20 mins - probably less with a fresh spray of silicon gel on the gunnels. You'll get there if you want to...

  14. #14
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    Apr 2009
    Location
    London
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    420

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    Quote Originally Posted by lowlander View Post
    thanks. yes, that's the ones i am using now. i was considering the newer bench type seats as they look like they would make it easier to move closer to one gunwhale when soloing.
    i haven't found anyone or any place (dealer) over here who has them so might just have to order one to find out.
    Hi there

    we ended up getting bench seats for our PacBoat towards the end of last year. Did you get some or are there some questions we can try to answer?

  15. #15
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    Sep 2007
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    Amsterdam, Netherlands
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    hey, thanks a million for remembering and getting back on this!
    no i haven't tried the bench seats yet but indeed, would be interested to know:
    - can the bench seat be installed in the middle, for solo use?
    - how does it feel, how does it affect handling compared to the tractor seats?
    - how is it for kneeling?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    420

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    The bench seats use the black rings on some of the frame uprights to fix in (they are on our new pakboat but not our old one). So they can only go where they are (though they do have some movability). (Though Pakboats might be able to ship some additional ones to fix on where you want them.) The seams might not be wide enough for the middle of the boat too. (again pakboat may make a wider one for the140/150 with a solo seat)

    I think they are more comfortable for sitting on and certainly give more scope for different positions. They are good for kneeling too, though i found that you need a screwdriver to get them tight enough when fitting them to stop them slipping when i was kneeling and paddling hard - sort of using them as a kneeling thwart?

    They didn't look quick as finished as i expected them to look, but they have worked fine.

    If you need any photos, let me know
    Last edited by twicezero; 14th-May-2012 at 09:32 PM.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    ok, i wasn't aware they need 'black rings' on the ribs. sounds i like to ask pakboats if i want to pursue this further.
    thanks for your help, it's made things more clear for me.

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