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Thread: Wenonah Advantage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    260

    Default Wenonah Advantage

    Maker's Spec

    16'6" Recreational Racing and fast cruisng
    Widths:
    max. width 29 1/2"
    max. gunwale 22 1/2"
    max. at 4" waterline 29 1/2"
    Depths:
    Bow 17"
    Center 13"
    Stern 14"
    Kevlar, Flex-core (43 lb. with standard equipment)
    Kevlar, Ultra-light Core (32 lb. with standard equipment)
    Graphite, Ultra-light Core (27 lb. with standard equipment)

    Maker's Write Up
    When Dave Kruger designed the Advantage he knew he had a fast, capable canoe. And true to form, the Advantage quickly became an all time favorite of marathon and recreational paddlers alike.
    Fast, efficient and responsive, the Advantage has few competitors in the paddling world. It is not as fast in straight-ahead speed as our marathon canoes, but the Advantage can keep up in all but the most blazing training runs. It is responsive, easy to paddle and friendly for paddlers of all abilities.
    After its introduction the Advantage proved so versatile that most were used for pleasure. Hence, he refined it to add buoyancy making the Advantage also a great boat for cruising and light tripping. With a daypack or slightly larger load, the Advantage is fast and stable, the perfect solo canoe for racing, fitness, or fast efficient cruising.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    819

    Default

    I have a flex-core Advantage with a wood trim and bought it mainly to be able to keep up with the kayaks in our club.

    I like the sliding seat to take care of trim without moving luggage around. Personally I find it performs best with just a little extra weight in the canoe, but that might be due to my own weight (or lack thereof), especially in windy conditions.

    Because of the sliding seat it's almost impossible to lower your gravity point, so I find it uncomfortable to paddle in cross winds. But that also can be helped with a little luggage.

    It's a long canoe with no rocker and very sharp entry lines. Definitely designed to go fast. It feels very stable though and the massive tumblehome give the boat it's distinctive looks and makes for comfortable paddling.

    Another advantage owner taught me how to turn the boat around with lesser effort by leaning out and forward in a turn and after getting the hang of that movement I haven't encountered a lot of turns that I couldn't take at (almost) full speed.

    The Advantage should best be paddled sit-and-switch style, but I can't do that. I don't like the (lack of) aesthetics of sit-and-switch paddling. I'll use that technique when I'm tired, but will mostly just be doing J-strokes with regular switches.

    It's a beautiful craft that does what it's designed for: go fast.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,483

    Default

    I think that Digger has sad most things good about this boat. I have paddled it for a bit and think that I can not tell much more about it.
    It is fast, nice and stable I think (but I am not avarage on this point)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I have had my Advantage now for some months and find it very stable and reasonably fast. I use it as a training boat for sit and switch C2. The boat width took some getting used to compared to out C2 but recently I have not noticed it so much. I paddle sit and switch with a 7 degree bent shaft paddle and have to change sides every 5 - 6 strokes.

    I found the supplied seat very painful so substituted it for a fixed high back kayak racing seat. I didn't use the original sliding seat arrangement so a fixed seat is fine for me

    The footrest is mounted about 2 inches too low for me so I modified it with a full plate footrest clipped to the front with cable ties which improved the speed and feeling of being part of the boat remarkably.

    The aluminium bar footrest is mounted on the standard We No Nah sliding track but no matter how much I tightened up the bolts it still moves. I have put extra stop bolts in the track to help lock it in place.

    Will try it soon with a higher seat as I paddle mainly calm placid water and I think that I would be able to get more power from sitting higher in the boat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    S-o-T, U.K.
    Posts
    4,708

    Default

    I've had my Advantage now for 2 days, went for a run on Rudyard Lake tonight. Even had a go with my Grey Owl split kk paddle ... wheeee!
    Thanks for the above post George ... the footbar moves ... especially the RHS ... I need to look into/sort that out.

    Like Digger, I'm not a fan of sit-&-switch, it might not be as fast but I prefer to kneel, that feels more natural for me ... the option of stretching my legs and sitting occasionally is good too.

    My Advantage might be about to be fitted with a saddle ... I wonder if I can adapt it to use the sliding track ... that might be really good for trim adjustments ... will it work ... I'll let you know :-D
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    819

    Default

    I never had any problems with the footbar. Did they change the design?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    S-o-T, U.K.
    Posts
    4,708

    Default

    Don't know ... maybe it's just this boat ... vintage 2012
    The "wing nut" comes to a definite solid stop ... but the rail can still slide when pressed upon in paddling ... I'll see when I take it apart.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

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