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Thread: Turtle paddles

  1. #1

    Default Turtle paddles

    I don't know what to say about the Turtle Paddle company. They were in business a few years ago, then a page came up on their website to say that they had ceased trading. Later it appeared that Turtle was back in business. Last weekend the website was up & running, with descriptions of all their models. This week, the link says 'account suspended'

    I haven't seen anyone else using Turtles, although there are some threads on SOTP about them, including this one.

    Three years ago I purchased a Turtle Whip-poor-will. This cherry wood beavertail has quite a small blade and the shaft is flattened to give a reasonable degree of flex. A slightly odd shape, with the Northwoods grip; it's never been my number one choice of paddle but is relaxing to use and is a nicely finished piece of wood.

    Last week, seeing a price I couldn't refuse, bought an Algonquin Guide in walnut. A very different shape but something to complement the rest of my collection. It's quite a stiff chunk of timber, weighing in at 930 grammes. This compares with 860 for the Whip-poor-will and 830 grammes for a Grey Owl Sagamore I have included in the shots for reference.



    The weight is forgotten once the paddle is in the water. It's a big blade and works best with relaxed, quiet strokes. And that size still generates some pace even with a slow cadence.

    Both paddles are smoothly finished and carefully varnished except for the top two inches of the grip, which will take a regular oiling. I find the shape of the grip encourages rotation in the hand.



    Turtle don't do razor-sharp edges like the Grey Owl, nor do they insert tip protectors. You just get more wood. This however doesn't mean a heavy feel in the water.



    So, I've got one paddle which has been a happy back-up for a few seasons. Just bought a big deepwater blade which feels right. I still don't think either will be my first choice (that will be my Edenwood) but a nice alternative to bring along and play with.

    And if you want to take a chance on a Turtle, I bought mine from i-canoe, Dublin. With various shapes currently at half price, even the €20 courier charge was tolerable.

    The Algonquin Guide arrived with a few light scuffs on the varnish. Nothing to be concerned about-but looked like it had been kicking around the store for some time. So I'm assuming that these are old, old stock.

    Last edited by Jon Wood; 4th-March-2012 at 01:38 PM. Reason: note on AG condition

  2. #2

    Default

    Great looking paddles

  3. #3

    Default

    I have 2 Turtle paddles, an ottertail and a beavertail, which I bought years and years ago - don't use 'em much anymore coz I have gravitated more to RedTails over the years. But, there's nothing wrong with 'em at all , even with all those miles on 'em. Don't remember what I paid for 'em, but whatever it was, I certainly got my money's worth from them.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Posts
    3,965

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    i have a turtle paddle that i quite like. it's a stylus with a grip like the whip-poor-will i actually have a review prepared that i should publish some day
    indeed, they are lighter ones around but as you say, once in the water they miraculously seem to loose most of the weight. probably because it's so easy to use it for linked strokes without needing to lift the paddle up and out of the water that much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Wood View Post
    I don't know what to say about the Turtle Paddle company. They were in business a few years ago, then a page came up on their website to say that they had ceased trading. Later it appeared that Turtle was back in business. Last weekend the website was up & running, with descriptions of all their models. This week, the link says 'account suspended'
    send me a pm if you need to get in touch with them directly.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

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    I have had an Algonquin Guide for a number of years. I quite like it as I use the Northwoods Stroke (that is what the funny grip is for) and also always paddle with the hull heeled over. The long blade gives good reach under the boat with your hands both over the sided.

    I do believe Jodie-Marc LaLonde sold the business a number of years ago and I lost touch.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    The rainy side of the Lakes.
    Posts
    825

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    My Algonquin Guide is the paddle that I reach for the most.

    I trimmed about 8mm from each side of the grip though, because despite my oversized mitts, I still found the grip a bit wide.
    Cheers, Michael.


    Brute Force and Ignorance is Vastly Underrated.

    "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
    -Sigurd Olson

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