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Thread: Venture Hunter 17

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    260

    Default Venture Hunter 17

    Maker Spec




    Length: 17"9' 540cm
    Width: 33.5' 85cm
    Weight: 88lbs 40Kgs
    Capacity: 1080lbs 490Kgs

    Makers Write Up

    The Hunter is a Canoe built to take that bit extra that bit further. This sleek easy to paddle design is ideal for touring when taking an extra family member or camping kit along. Also ideal for centre and group use due to it's tough polyethylene construction.
    Stable and efficient to paddle the Hunter will inspire confidence in the users and allow you to explore your surroundings more easily than ever before.
    • Tough polyethylene material
    • Ideal for family or centre use
    • Large load capacity
    Last edited by Canoe Guru; 8th-August-2007 at 09:56 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Nairnshire
    Posts
    61

    Default We have one !

    We’ve a 2001 version of the Hunter 17 … when Venture / Mobile Adventure canoes were still branded as Pyranha. Very much superior to our previous, ancient, 15’ Coleman. She slips along nicely, and I like the even/reliable secondary stability from its rounded hull and quite pointy ends - an easy boat to lean. She's plenty stable enough, but we lowered the seats and inch or two and the boat feels much better as a result. Can handle the four of us no problem (10yo + 13yo + 2 adults), and is fine with just 2 adults - but can really catch the wind if small people/lightly laden (as seen below) or solo. Seems pretty seaworthy. Don’t do much river-work, but we find her manoeuvrable enough on larger rivers.



    Ours suffers from a limited area of wobbly-bottom - possibly the result of being stored upside-down in the heat by previous owners ?? I can just manage to carry it / get it on the roof of the van solo …. but it is heavy and its always a real battle to get it up onto your shoulders and onto the van.

    So; yes; its a good, fast, family boat - and is rewarding to paddle compared to the very bottom of the market. Its more manoeuvrable that you'd perhaps expect - but don't bother trying going solo in a breeze without plenty of ballast !


    - RoryD

  3. #3

    Default

    We've just got a Hunter 17 in the Corelite X material.

    I don't have much to compare it to as my other boats are an Ocean Kayak, a Kirton Mystere and a double scull. But it's exactly what I wanted - stable enough to take plenty of kids and have lots of room for a picnic, but still quite quick. Took a quick paddle on the Kennet from Marsport, then a bit of a wander around the sidewaters of Windsor at the weekend, so managed a paddle up a fairly strong current quite well. It doesn't cut through waves quite like the racing kayak and I wouldn't surf on it like the OK, but we had to real problems paddling, other than that if you're in it by yourself at the back, the whole thing sticks up in the air, which I assume is the same for most boats.

    Build quality looks nice to me, and it's already been subjected to a fair bit of driftwood and branches. The lightweight-ish material makes it pretty straightforward to lift onto the car with two people.

    So quite chuffed for the moment, and planning some Thames trips.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    21,581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tmap View Post
    We've just got a Hunter 17 in the Corelite X material.

    I don't have much to compare it to as my other boats are an Ocean Kayak, a Kirton Mystere and a double scull. But it's exactly what I wanted - stable enough to take plenty of kids and have lots of room for a picnic, but still quite quick. Took a quick paddle on the Kennet from Marsport, then a bit of a wander around the sidewaters of Windsor at the weekend, so managed a paddle up a fairly strong current quite well. It doesn't cut through waves quite like the racing kayak and I wouldn't surf on it like the OK, but we had to real problems paddling, other than that if you're in it by yourself at the back, the whole thing sticks up in the air, which I assume is the same for most boats.

    Build quality looks nice to me, and it's already been subjected to a fair bit of driftwood and branches. The lightweight-ish material makes it pretty straightforward to lift onto the car with two people.

    So quite chuffed for the moment, and planning some Thames trips.
    Hello and Welcome!

    My first proper canoe was a Venture from Marsport, so I feel your excitement!

    Lots of trips on the Thames, Kennet, Lodden, especially once the flow drops away again. You've also got the Wey and the Basingstoke Canal not far away to the south, and the Grand Union & Oxford Canals to the north.

    Try reversing the canoe and sitting on the front seat backwards when solo paddling, and add bags to the front end to stop it sticking up in the air. You want the "trim" to be as close to level as possible really. As you say, its the same for any canoe.

  5. #5

    Default

    I meant "we had no real problems", to clarify!
    Thanks for the tips.

    Want to do a 3 Men In A Boat trip in the summer, and even have a dog called Montmorency! Always aimed to do it in a rowing skiff but if Jerome K Jerome had had one, he'd have used a canoe...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    21,581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tmap View Post
    I meant "we had no real problems", to clarify!
    Thanks for the tips.

    Want to do a 3 Men In A Boat trip in the summer, and even have a dog called Montmorency! Always aimed to do it in a rowing skiff but if Jerome K Jerome had had one, he'd have used a canoe...
    Hah, make sure you wear appropriate period dress.

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