Results 1 to 31 of 31

Thread: Bell Yellowstone Solo

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    260

    Default Bell Yellowstone Solo

    Maker's Spec

    WEIGHTS BY LAYUPKevLight - 29 lbs.
    BlackGold - 32 lbs.
    Royalex - 44 lbs.

    Length: 14'
    Length/Width Ratio: 6
    Rocker: Bow 2.5" Stern 1.5"

    Shear:
    Bow: 18.5"
    Mid: 12.5"
    Stern: 16.5"

    Width:
    Gunwale width - 27"
    Max width - 30"
    3" WL width - 26.5"

    Displacement:
    2" WL - 150 lbs.
    3" WL - 240 lbs.
    4 " WL - 340 lbs.

    Capacity:
    6" Freeboard: 650 lbs.
    Optimum Load: 160-280 lbs.

    Maker's Write Up
    The Yellowstone Solo is one of our most versatile solo canoes. It is at home on rivers and streams, and handles mild whitewater in stride. Its dry, full design tracks well, maneuvers effortlessly, and provides ample speed for cruising in the calm stretches. The Yellowstone Solo is the perfect solo utility canoe. It is designed and built to handle all kinds of water.
    *Shown with wood trim.
    Last edited by Chrish; 26th-October-2007 at 10:41 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Nr Rochester in Kent
    Posts
    3,838

    Default

    Had this boat for almost a year now, and really love it. It's light weight (in royalex) makes it a joy to lug about. After carrying one of these you'll think all other boats are made of lead. If you do a lot of portaging or have a lot of lifting then this boat will make it a lot easier.

    If you've never paddled one of these narrow solo boats before then the thing you will really notice is how tippy it is compared to a wider beam trad boat. This is just how they are. You need to kneel to stabilise the boat properly, but even then don't turn around in a hurry or you'll be swimming . If you can get used to the tippyness though it is a rewarding paddle. A good compromise between agility and tracking, it is farily easy to propel in a straight line or against a fair current.

    It will carry a fair load. Certainly enough for a few days solo camping.

    I've now done loads of flatwater paddling, plus some Grade 1/2 rivers where it has coped well. The gunwale is lowish but not too much so. It will ship water in big waves and slowing it down during a rapid will keep you much drier. I have taken it out onto open water, but only in real calm conditions. I would not personally recommend it for open water. I would also think twice if you are a lrge person. I'm 12 stone and it feels good. Much heavier and the centre of gravity might suffer to your detriment.

    If you're thinking about a Wenonah Argosy, you should look at this boat. It has a similar spec but feels much more different than you might expect.

    Anyway here's a few pics because I love it so much.

    An inaugural wetting


    River Medway


    River Beult



    Gwing paddlin my boat
    Last edited by Matto; 6th-March-2007 at 12:27 PM. Reason: Can't type, can't spell!
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamm, Germany
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Hi Matto

    The boat looks nice.
    I am looking for a solo canoe and my final choice isn't taken.
    There is a NO budget boat : Merlin II in Black-Gold.
    But my budget boat is the Yellowstone solo in RX.
    Because it is very short I wonder if "parameters" fits to that boat.
    My height is 5'9'' (180cm) and my weight is 210lbs (95kg).
    I can not see your size out of the photos.
    Do you think the boat will enough for me?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chesham in Bucks.
    Posts
    1,320

    Default

    I'm 85Kg and you can see how the boat sits with me in it in the picture above (Matto is lighter).

    The boat can plainly take 95Kg and more without reaching capacity. However for these comparitively small boats be aware that their handling characteristics change with load. As you can see the YS above (as with my Argosy) has pretty much all of the waterline submersed and hence is much less maneoeverable than with a lighter paddler.

    If you are planning on sometimes taking extra gear as well it might be a good idea to go for a bit larger boat as this could be expected to handle better - or at least make sure you try one out first.
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Nr Rochester in Kent
    Posts
    3,838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoiker View Post
    Hi Matto

    The boat looks nice.
    I am looking for a solo canoe and my final choice isn't taken.
    There is a NO budget boat : Merlin II in Black-Gold.
    But my budget boat is the Yellowstone solo in RX.
    Because it is very short I wonder if "parameters" fits to that boat.
    My height is 5'9'' (180cm) and my weight is 210lbs (95kg).
    I can not see your size out of the photos.
    Do you think the boat will enough for me?
    The Bell Merlin II - sigh. One day eh?

    As to the Yellowstone Solo, yes, try one out definitely. I'm 6ft and about 165lbs. Being heavier might be tricky, but being less tall will be to your advantage in a boat like this. You deiniftely should try before you buy though.

    I wouldn't have any qualms about loading it with gear as well as myself. You can see that the freeboard is not very much affected by extra weight. I think it's the handling that will suffer more.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamm, Germany
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Hi Matto

    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    The Bell Merlin II - sigh. One day eh?
    I try to find the definitv boat. And if, it may cost a "little" more.
    I'm not the type for bying, trying and sold it after a relativ short period.
    So it SHOULD be the one for the next decade. Minimum.


    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    As to the Yellowstone Solo, yes, try one out definitely. I'm 6ft and about 165lbs. Being heavier might be tricky, but being less tall will be to your advantage in a boat like this. You deiniftely should try before you buy though.
    Ok, 210 lbs is my current maximum. It is one reason for bying the canoe.
    I hope to get down to my std. weight of ~185lbs.
    Because of my current job the is not enough free time left.
    But in the first week of may here in Dortmund,Germany we have 2 days of
    boat testing. Initiated from a local outdor and canoe dealer.
    Bell, wenonah, indian canoe, mad river and so on will be there with most
    of the products. So I will test everything that I can get under my .... :-)
    I hop they have several Bell's there.

    Thanks for your infos

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kidderminster
    Posts
    22

    Thumbs up My New Bell Yellowstone

    After selling my pack on ebay, I decided on a final test of the Argosy before buying one and then bought a yellowstone solo

    After testing both on a canal, I decided the yellowstone was more stable and tracked better, although the Argosy turned on a tuppence and seemed faster.

    This weekend its was testing time for my new boat on flatwater on Lake Bala. It tracks far far better than the pack, and I am finding I am now over correcting, which will take a little time to get used too. It was also excellent in the wind, again, far better than my pack which is difficult to keep in a straight line. I think the seat is too far forward and too low down to knee properly so tommorows night's task is to fit my old kneeing thwart a little further back. I had some difficulty triming the boat properly, but I think this will be solved by putting the thwart in. Putting the heavy food box into my boyfriends boat also helped, although unfortunately I don't think that's a permamaent solution, that excuse has gone now I have a bigger boat

    I can also edge it until the gunwales are touching the water (whilst holding on to my boyfriends boat ) so it should be quite stable in faster water. It is more rounded and feels that you can slowly and confidently egde it as opposed to the argosy and freedom solo which feel to me is if you edge it slowly it'll suddenly tip you.

    The glide isn't fantastic, but then it's a 14' boat and not a 17', but it is faster than the pack as I'm doing far less corrective strokes and I'm now managing to keep up with my boyfriends legend 15.

    Next adventure will be a bit of white water, so I'll let you know how it fares on that too!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    In a cottage in a Forest with no neighbours! Heaven!
    Posts
    899

    Default Bell Yellowstone Solo.

    Congratulations, a good choice of boat. I bought an Old Town Charles River RX early part of last year which I really love. Then I found SotP and wondered why some people had several boats! As winter aproached and I gained more experience I found that I NEEDED another boat for more adventurous excursions, and after much research and reading the views and opinons of other Sotp members decided on a Bell Chestnut Prospector 16. I was well impressed with the quality. And for me she handles like a dream.
    So thats it! Two lovely boats, each with their own particular uses, I certainly wouldn't need anymore. And certainly not a solo canoe, couldn't see the point, and they were so tippy too.
    HOWEVER....my wife decided she would like to try paddling solo ( was I that bad as a back seat paddler when we were tandem!?! ......er....quite possibly).
    So more resarch and trying different boats. A Big 'thank you' to Matto for his report on the Yellowstone, very helpful. Also a huge thank you to Tony at 'Sues Canoes' in Watton, Norfolk. The poor man is a mental wreck. He hides away in the corner of his shop when I call in for fear of Jane finding out how much I have spent there ( his advice has saved me making many a wrong purchase, and he does some amazing deals, all our gear and boats have come from Tony, we are that happy with him, and not forgetting 'Sue' herself, and Richard their son for helping us with the 'Dark Side' .....kayaking. ) So.......when the aforementioned man also suggested a Bell Yellowstone it was off to his shop. He had two of them being delivered the following Monday. This time he didn't have to hide as Jane was spending 'our' money. As Matto says, it is so strange to pick up a canoe and carry it on your shoulder......but sooo narrow after paddling 'normal' canoes. First trial paddle the following Saturday at our local outdoor centre at Mepal, Cambs. Throw bags at the ready and much foolish giggling from myself and fellow Sotp member 'Steve D' as Jane got into this tiny looking excuse of a canoe and promptly set off across the lake NOT tipping over once, in fact looking very at home in it
    Well I eventually managed to pry Jane out and let me have a go.
    WOW.....NICE. Never thought I would enjoy a solo boat. As Matto says, it is tippy after being in a traditional canoe......but that equates to agility......now Jane couldn't get me out of her boat!

    As other Sotp members have said in the past, as you put more time in on the water and gain more experience, a boat you have paddled perhaps only a few months earlier and then have had a break from can seem like it handles so much more better when used anew. I found this to be the case when I had a break from my 'Charles River' after buying the Bell Prospector. It's good to have a change to appreciate the different boats as your ability ( slowly) grows. My earlier experiences in solos had put me off these narrow little things, so I'm glad Jane decided to 'go solo'.

    Another change of perspective too.....the car will have to do for a lot longer yet.....it does its job......it transports canoes....different priorities nowadays.......the following week I relieved Tony of the other Bell Yellowstone Solo, ( and yes he had to hide in the corner again, this time with me hiding with him whilst I worked out how to explain to Jane why I NEEDED the Solo so much.

    Anyway, it's so nice now to go for a paddle and Jane can explore where she wants and to feel independant. And I can explore in all the little places that Jane objected to when she was right in the front of the canoe and I was shoving her into the undergrowth

    So....lovely little canoe.....wouldn't be without it....looking forward to some moving water and lots of new experiences in it.

    Go try one!!

  9. #9

    Default bell yellowstone solo

    i've had my yellowstone solo for about four or five years now.it was one of the first royalex boats in the country.it took me months to decide on the right choice.it's always a bit of a compromise chosing the right boat,ideally it would be 17 feet long, weigh 10lbs and turn well and of course track like an arrow and be short for easy portaging (i'm still looking for that one!). i wanted a boat that was as easy as a kayak to portage, turned and tracked reasonably ,was able to take a few knocks and could be stored outside with little ill effect.i have been very pleased with my choice,i use it mostly to go out paddling on my own on local canals and rivers,but have also used it for canoe camping.it managed fine with all my gear and me on the wrong side of sixteen stone!
    i use a proper canoe paddle most of the time,but if i want to fly past the 2 man canoes i use an extra long kayak paddle,not really purist,but nor is a royalex canoe.
    sitting,it feels a bit tippy compared to the big barges but you soon get used to that and kneeling it feels more stable. so far the only time i have capsized is when i have been prating about!
    overall it's the perfect compromise and i would mark it 8 out of 10.
    happy paddling,
    rhymsey.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kidderminster
    Posts
    22

    Talking Yellowstone Solo on WW- update

    I was a bit nervous about how much water it would ship as it doesn't have a huge amount of freeboard. However on a recent trip down the jackfields rapids it took on hardly any water and I was most impressed. It seems to float above the waves and didn't feel at all tippy, well not noticeably more so than other boats on WW (legend & pack)

    The blog on the trip is http://songofthepaddle.co.uk/forum/s...502#post198502

    (includes a video of me in the yellowstone going down the rapids)

    So thumbs up to the little boat

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Felixstowe
    Posts
    646

    Default

    I've also found my Yellowstone Solo to be a very capable craft in all kinds of conditions, I think Bell have a fine hull shape for the Y-Solo and it's big brother the Yellowstone. I can recommend use of a bent shaft (as well as a straight shaft) paddle, width of this canoe enables easy switching of sides, adds to pace notably and can make all the difference when heading into the wind or lumpy water. Fine solo Rx canoe.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Halifax, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,000

    Default

    Well I did get myself the Yellowstone Solo to tide me over until the Mohawk gets here, if it ever does



    The angled seat was a little low so a few adjustments were made to allow my feet under it in comfort.


    To provide more comfort and control, foam mats were positioned on the inside of the cockpit.



    As the majority of my paddling is done on flat water over a few days and camping kit is carried gear loops were a must. As the Bell has such nice lines it seemed a shame to drill the hull and lace it so I used the Retro method of affixing gear loops to the gunwales.



    These were made up of stainless nuts, bolts and 'P' clips holding bungee cord and clear tubing.


    As I didn't intend using airbags there was the need for some sort of paddle storage. I manufactured this from some cordura, brass eyelet kit and climbing cord.


    Combined with paddle shaft retainers on the thwart.




    I dare say it's not to everyone's taste but it ticks the boxes for what I needed.



    Now to paddle it.
    Leone_blanco

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kidderminster
    Posts
    22

    Smile

    Yes I found the seat a little low on it, I've now swaped it for a thwart instead...

    I'm interested what how you've attached stuff without drlling the hull... might have a go later on in the year

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Maidenhead, Berkshire.
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I took my Yellowstone Solo out for the first time last Thursday, on the Thames at Aston. It was a beautiful day but with quite gusty winds. I found the Solo a lovely boat to paddle, tracking well but turning with little effort.

    I was a little worried having read reports of the boat being a bit unstable but I found her to be more than stable enough, especially secondary stability. The river was very busy with the usual "Gin Palaces" and the Solo rolled nicely over bow waves coming from all directions very well. She also handled gusts of wind, some quite strong, again coming from front and rear, tracking well and needing very little correction.

    I'm not a hugely experienced paddler but I found the Solo to be an excellent boat, one which I'm very glad I brought. The only change I propose to make is altering the seat so that I can paddle kneeling as well as sitting as, at the moment the seat is far too low to get my feet under. I don't want to completely replace the seat with a thwart so I'm puzzling over different ideas to have the seat adjustable to two levels.

    All in all a great boat which I would recommend with no reservations.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Boldon NE UK
    Posts
    232

    Default how did it go?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Dickinson View Post
    The only change I propose to make is altering the seat so that I can paddle kneeling as well as sitting as, at the moment the seat is far too low to get my feet under. I don't want to completely replace the seat with a thwart so I'm puzzling over different ideas to have the seat adjustable to two levels.
    .
    Did you solve the seat level / kneeling thwart dilemma?
    Hils

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    In a cottage in a Forest with no neighbours! Heaven!
    Posts
    899

    Default

    If it's of any help, I kept the seat hangers the same length (rather than cut them shorter) and made up a tripple slatted thwart.
    As you can see in the picture, the slats fix on top of two side runners that are fitted using the original seat bolts. This means the effective height of the seat is increased by 20mm, but your heels don't get caught on the slats as they do on the back of the seat, and your 'bum' gets more support than with a standard thwart.



    The Yellowstone Solo is one boat that I really do miss. Both myself and my wife had one each. We only sold them to fund a couple of composite canoes (both Bells, a Seliga and a Merlin). But I do regret parting with my green Solo....I found it a great little craft, and very capable. My grandaughter loved it too.
    So I'm biting the bullet and getting another one...I've found this is one canoe that I cannot do without in the fleet

    Davy

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Maidenhead, Berkshire.
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hils View Post
    Did you solve the seat level / kneeling thwart dilemma?
    Hils
    Not yet I'm afraid. I've had thoughts about attaching some sort of angled bracket to the ends of the seat which would, in turn, slot into a bracket attached to the seat mounts. Brackets could be attached allowing two different seat hights, one for sitting, one for kneeling. An added advantage of this would be the fact that your body weight would hold the seat in but, in the event of a capsize the seat would easily kick free. A variant would be to drill into the ends of the seat where it meets the seat mount and screw in a screw or bolt that would fit in a cup attached to the seat mount. This would be neater. I'm sure I've seen this sort of fitting on Flat pack furniture but have no idea where you get the cups from.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Barrie ON. Canada
    Posts
    7

    Default Bell Yelolowstone Solo

    I went up to Swifts store in Gravenhurst on Sunday. Temp about +3, snow on the ground but they were very helpful. We a staff and I took both the Yellowstone and Rockstar in roylex up to Gull lake a 10 min drive into town and I tried them out. The Rockstar was slow to accelerate but was soon moving along at 7k, it turned well but felt too wide for my 5'6" body. With two blue barrels full of wet snow say 25 lbs each it was slower but a nice canoe with tons of initial and secondary stability it turns well and would be a nice tripper. The Yellow stone looks great and accelerates fast much faster than I expected. In only three strokes it was doing 6k and soon hit 7.3 by my GPS. It took little to maintain that speed empty. I am 175 lbs. It turns very nicely, tracked well light weight for roylex 44lbs it feels lighter. With the two blue barrels full of snow it was slower but still crused at 6.3 easily. I did not take the time to move the barrels around to see what that might do. I found it very stable and the secondary it great. At any rate I liked it a lot (a fun canoe) and since it fit what I wanted. Light weight for the many portages here and roylex for the rapids, fast enough to keep up on the lakes, it will carry enough gear for a week easily, maybe two (I travel light) but be fun on twisty streams and in beaver ponds. I bought it.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

    Default

    Kinda surprised that Swift had both Bells. Rockstar is hard to find! Its a boat for the over 225 lbers or tall people. Short folks have a hard time getting a vertical paddle plant, unless the short folk have very long arms.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    In a cottage in a Forest with no neighbours! Heaven!
    Posts
    899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Davy Crockett View Post
    The Yellowstone Solo is one boat that I really do miss. Both myself and my wife had one each. We only sold them to fund a couple of composite canoes (both Bells, a Seliga and a Merlin). But I do regret parting with my green Solo....I found it a great little craft, and very capable. My grandaughter loved it too.
    So I'm biting the bullet and getting another one...I've found this is one canoe that I cannot do without in the fleet

    Davy
    Well I did bite the bullet....collected the new Yellowstone Solo couple of weeks back. Fellow Sotp member 'Low Ratio', who had tried one of mine when I had them up for sale, bought himself one at the same time.
    Poor Tony (Sues Canoes) had just bought the last ones from the importer, and we immediately relieved him of two of them. I think the one he has in his shop now is the last one left in the country....and no sign of anymore coming in....so be quick if you want the last one (if it's still there).

    Myself and 'Low Ratio' took the 'new girls' out the following day....if there is a lesson to be learnt here from my own point of view, it's that if you hesitate about selling a canoe as much as I did with the Solo's, then as much as you may use 'logic' that it needs to go, you really need to listen to the 'gut feeling' instead.

    Really nice to be back in the Y/Solo....really missed it.....appreciate it a lot more now!

    Davy.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Davy Crockett View Post
    Well I did bite the bullet....collected the new Yellowstone Solo couple of weeks back.
    You can't have been that keen: Tony said the one on the shelf was yours when we were in the store in October


    A few more general thoughts on the Yellowstone Solo:
    • It's as much as squashed, Bell Merlin II as a skegged Bell/Placid/Colden Wildfire... though as both are excellent canoes, that not a bad heritage
    • The shouldered tumblehome (characteristic of assorted David Yost designed hulls, including the Merlin II and Wildfire) gives the hull reassuring secondary stability: it's a joy to heel for turns.
    • The skegged stern that it shares with the Merlin II means it tracks pretty (and is extremely forgiving for beginner-intermediate paddlers), but also means it needs to be heeled right to the rails to get a 180 degree spin - the stern catches on a slight heel.
    • The "fit" is more Wildfire than Merlin II: it's beamier at the waterline (and more stable) than either... and smaller paddlers may rattle around a little.
    Given the choice, I'd take either the Merlin II (for open water tripping) or the Wildfire (for rivers) over the Yellowstone Solo... but since neither of those are available at the same pricepoint, or in Royalex, the Yellowstone Solo offers something quite distinctive.

    Obvious alternative: the Wenonah Argosy - though it's a very different hull, and despite the superficial similarities in proportions, to my mind it's best suited to a slightly bigger larger paddler, or to one keener on sit-n-switch.


    Quote Originally Posted by Davy Crockett View Post
    Poor Tony (Sues Canoes) had just bought the last ones from the importer, and we immediately relieved him of two of them. I think the one he has in his shop now is the last one left in the country....and no sign of anymore coming in
    Some sort of official statement on this import situation would be good, but whcihever way you look at it, losing Bell canoes would be a major blow for the UK market: decent alternatives to gems like Bell's Yellowstone Solo, Merlin II, Magic and Nothstar are pretty difficult to obtain!

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

    Default

    While the YS is a good tripping boat I got an Argosy in RX. Price for a boat used once was good at 600 USD. I think if money didn't matter I would have preferred the YS but all is well anyway.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    Posts
    197

    Default Yellowstone solo.

    The more I read about this canoe the more I want to own one, I know it is a long shot but does anybody know of any second hand ones on the market?
    Alan

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Barrie ON. Canada
    Posts
    7

    Default Yellow stone solo

    I have been paddling my new Yellowstone solo a fair bit although everything is freezing solid over here. It is a fun canoe no regrets. It handles small streams and large windy lakes with no problems. I outfitted it with two four ft. air bags and attached the air bag ropes to the gunnels. I put in knee straps with adjustable anchors, raised the seat an inch, that made no difference at all in stability but allowed my feet to fit under the seat a lot better. I may raise it again in the spring. I put in a foot brace by glueing two anchors on the inside of the hull three inches up on each side near my feet and attached a nylon one inch strap between them, then attached another strap from the knee strap anchors on the bottom of the hull to the center of the foot strap. So far it works well and avoids any holes in the hull. I made a removable yoke out of a thwart and some three inch stainless bolts with large plastic heads that came off my car top carrier. The bolts are permanently attached to the yoke with two lock nuts and I bought the new Wenenah yoke pads attaching these to the yoke. Finally I drilled two holes in the gunnels so that the yoke bolts solidly to the gunnels but can be romoved easily. It's going to be a long winter.
    Last edited by JMR; 25th-December-2010 at 02:31 PM. Reason: more material

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,656

    Default

    I'm not sure what Bell were playing at selling the YS Solo with such low seats: I can only think that thay were either pandering to beginner paddlers (a significant part of the beginner-intermediate target market for what I believe was their first Rx solo) or for the US sit and switch market (as folk tend to sit lower than they kneel).

    This photo of the earlier Fire series boats show what I would have anticipated on an older Yellowstone Solo:



    Some 8.5" below the front rail strikes me as a bare minimum for kneeling: I prefer more, but that suffices.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Manitoba
    Posts
    21

    Default Not a fan

    Summary - too small for my liking.

    I owned a YS briefly but it didn't suit me. I weigh approximately 90kg, and even without any extra load I found it to be a bit sluggish and unresponsive. Maybe this is the "skegged" stern rocker profile, or maybe because I typically paddle tandem boats heeled over. I did heel this one, but I suspect the footprint was still as large as a tandem boat heeled. It didn't spin like I had hoped. For me, I would rather have a magic or merlin so at least I had some forward speed, or a classic 16' tandem so I could go faster and turn much faster. The only disadvantage of this later is in big winds.

    By comparison, the only other solos I have owned were the Mad River Guide (freedom solo) and a couple whitewater boats. I enjoyed the guide as an all-around solo for mostly rivers, but sold it as it was heavier than a kevlar prospector and less versatile.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

    Default

    The YS is not a spinner for sure. The Mohawk 14 would be the only rubber boat I can think of with symmetrical bow and stern rocker.

    SGS posted a pix of two Colden Fire boats. They are relatively new and true to the old Bell Fire series. The Wild will spin with even a 250 lb er. The problem is that with skegged stern rocker and a fair amount of weight you have to heel that boat all the way over to even have a hope of releasing the stern. And even then it still may catch.

    Coldens are composites.

    The Merrimack Baboosuc is a wonderful boat for bigger paddlers and often entirely ignored.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Reliance
    Posts
    1

    Default That's a novel idea

    I recently bought a Bell Yellowstone solo in kevlar. At this point I have turned the boat around and kneel. I like what you have done, Davy, instead of the seat because my feet do not comfortably fit under it.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Barrie ON. Canada
    Posts
    7

    Default Bell Yellowstone

    I paddled the solo for the first time in rapids today. Head river north East of Orillia Ontario North of Seabright. Pictures on Barrie Canoe and Kayak Club web page. The Yellowstone solo was a very pleasent surprise much easier to control than expected, dryer than expected and turned better in moving water than expected. Not as turny as a moving water solo but still very nice loads of fun and faster on the flats. Did I mention that I was able to sit on the seat during the flat water. Ran a three foot water fall in the middle of a rapid and stayed dry! That was a nice surpise. This canoe is a nice multipurpose canoe far better than expected and I expected a lot.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    Posts
    197

    Default Yellowstone Solo

    Great to read this post JMR, I picked mine up at the weekend & am really looking forward to paddling it in the next few weeks.

  31. #31
    Crow's Avatar
    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    16,117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyNoleen View Post
    Great to read this post JMR, I picked mine up at the weekend & am really looking forward to paddling it in the next few weeks.
    Ooooh. Can I have a go?

    Here comes the future and you can't run from it
    If you've got a blacklist I want to be on it


    Crow Trip Log

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •