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Thread: Happy New Year to Canoe Sailors everywhere!

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Happy New Year to Canoe Sailors everywhere!

    Happy New Year to Canoe Sailors everywhere!


  2. #2

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    Despite the clear oxymoron in the title of this thread.........


    HAPPY NEW YEAR to all you sailor fellas & gals......

  3. #3
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    Dec 2011
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    I can't win 'em all

    and Happy New Year likewise ............. to all who feel most at home on the water and under the sky.

    Best Wishes for 2012..............

  4. #4

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    Happy New year to all Canoeists and Canoe Sailors!




    May 2012 see further development in the advancement and education of the past, present and future of Canoe Sailing!

  5. #5
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    grange over sands, cumbria
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    Default

    A Happy New Year to canoe sailors everywhere (and canoeists)
    I like the picture of the jib on your Curlew Unk.

  6. #6
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    kent
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    East Africa,2011. Low tech outrigger sailing canoes along this coast .



    A healthy,happy and prosperous New Year to all.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by andre View Post
    East Africa,2011. Low tech outrigger sailing canoes along this coast .
    A healthy,happy and prosperous New Year to all.
    About this time 2 years ago, a fisherman from Diani Beach, Kenya agreed to let me take his outrigger sailing canoe for a spin. He called himself 'Captain Banana' and he was understandably reluctant to let me take his fishing boat out, but after long discussions with his extended family, an accompanied trial run and after suitable after a charter fee was agreed I sailed out to the offshore reef (where the breakers are) and back with my wife. I felt privileged to have been trusted with his boat. Making any progress to windward was beyond my skill level, so a fair bit of paddling was needed to get it back to the start point. Tacking involved passing the sail from one side to the other in front of the lateen yard (or spar / mast), and steering was with a paddle.

    Last edited by GavinM; 1st-January-2012 at 05:19 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    south Cumbria
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    Happy New Year to all canoeists everywhere!

    Whether propelling their craft by paddle, oars, sail, pole or carrying it on shoulders, trolley or whatever! The term sailing-canoe or canoe-sailor might be an oxymoron for some people but there is plenty of history to show otherwise.
    From the introduction to Canoe and Boatbuilding for Amateurs

    by W.P Stephens - 1889

    The word canoe has two distinct meanings, having been applied, for how long a time no one knows, to boats of long and narrow proportions, sharp at both ends and propelled by paddles held in the hand, without a fixed fulcrum, the crew facing forward. The members of this great family vary greatly in size and model, from the kayak of the Esquimau, to the long war canoes, 80 to 100 feet long, of the islands of the Pacific. Within the past twenty years the word has been applied in England and America in a more limited sense, to small craft used for racing, traveling and exploring, as well as the general purposes of a pleasure boat, the main essentials being those mentioned above, while sails and a deck are usually added, the double paddle being used exclusively. In Canada the term has for a long time been applied to a similar boat, used for hunting and fishing, without decks, and propelled by a single paddle. The following pages will refer only to the second meaning given, as the one of most importance to the amateur builder, and as the instructions given will apply equally to the simpler and less complicated Canadian open canoe.

    [....]

    Modern canoes may, however, be classed in a different manner, according to the relative proportions of their paddling and sailing qualities, thus: Paddling Canoes - Propelled solely by paddle.
    Sailable Paddling - Sail being used as auxiliary, as in the early Rob Roy.
    Sailing and Paddling - Both qualities being about equal, as in most cruising canoes.
    Paddleable Sailing - Fitted mainly for sailing, as the later English boats, the paddle being auxiliary.
    Sailing - Larger boats for two or three, using oars as auxiliaries, as the Mersey canoes.

    Italics - are not mine but the bold is. For more see: http://dragonflycanoe.com/stephens/

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