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Thread: Mad River Explorer 16

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    260

    Default Mad River Explorer 16

    Maker's Spec


  2. #2

    Default MRC Explorer 16

    I have had one of these for about 5 years, royalex and wood trim.

    I bought the boat to trip, tandem paddling and fully loaded with kit. In this role the canoe excels. Its a Volvo estate of canoes.

    It has very good carrying capacity and the shallow V hull is very stable with high intial stability. Secondary stability is good but not in the same league as my Supernova or Wenowah Prospector 15.

    The boat tracks well tandem and for its capacity is not too slow. I have found that it oil cans when lightly loaded in tandem mode.

    Paddled the Spey tandem fully loaded in it last year and it performed well, and kept up resonably dry in big wave trains (traveling slower than current).

    The shallow v hull does attract wear along the hull center line, mine now sports skid plates. Quality of royalex and fitting is good.

    I progressed to WW padling in this boat fitting a kneeling thwart some 16inches back from center.

    I have managed the boat on Gr3 trips, found it a little large and requires some effort to turn, but capable.

    Solo paddling is much more rewarding both on the flat and moving water if the boat is keeled over on its side, so it rides on one side of the shallow V, this speeds the boat up on the flat and makes it much more manoverable on moving water.

    For me a superb tandem flat water and moving water tripping boat. For WW / flat water solo use it a bit heavy and on the large side compared with something like a prospector 15.

    Andy

  3. #3
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    Dec 2006
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    south Cumbria
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    Default MRC Explorer 16

    I too have had a MRC Explorer 16 in Royalex with wood trim for quite a few years (12ish) and have always been impressed with it.

    Great capacity and performance in rough water such as up to G3 and bumpy lakes, lochs and sea. Due to the shallow V it has a different feel from many boats - some people notice an initial slight tippiness, which then firms up nicely and is lovely to paddle in smooth conditions with both knees together down in one bilge and the gunwhale close to the water.

    Several times I have been on a trip with others in different boats and when comparing notes after a particularly bumpy stretch they have had a really hard time whereas I may have found it a bit exciting but nowhere near as much hassle as they seem to have had - the Explorer seems to deal with waves from any direction really well.

    I once met the manufacturers from Mad River who were doing the rounds at the International Canoe Exhibition some years ago, where my boat was on our (the Open Canoe Sailing Group) stand and they said the Explorer was their best selling boat by far (this was 12 years ago in 95) due to it being a great all rounder.


    It does oil-can a little when tandem and the outer vinyl layer does get some stick on the keel line (I've gone for epoxy and glass tape strips for a couple of feet at bow and stern rather than ugly kevlar felt - I renew it every few years).

    Even in Royalex it's not a light boat like the manufacturers would like you to believe. With the extra fittings like thwarts and buoyancy it is close to 90lbs but as I'm a big brute I can get it on and off the vehicle and the water by myself if I have to and it is bigger but 10lbs lighter than my previous boat (a OT Disco 158).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    between Kinross and Alloa, Scotland
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    2,494

    Default some earlier observations

    It would be easy to slag this canoe off for being uninspired and a workhorse, but that would be unfair. I didn't keep mine very long because it felt so dead; however, it had no vices either and certainly did all it was asked to do.

    The 16 footer coped with a weeks camping tandem with dog. We had it on salt water, but never used it WW. We didn't sail it, but I think it would do well under sail.

    In a sense I'm not too qualified to comment on this boat. Some very repected paddlers use them to good effect, and certainly there seems nothing wrong with them as such......I just found it a mundane paddling experience.
    If it wasn't for the rain in our lives there would be no rivers. X 2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New England, New France
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    28

    Default

    Mine's 19 years old, with wood gunwales. I sail it, pole it, paddle mostly solo on everything from flatwater to class III whitewater and pushing IV. It feels a little snug as a tandem, mostly because I'm used to going solo. It's the standard for poling, the high sides and v-hull are great for sailing. Some say you should lengthen the center thwart a little to give it more rocker. It's great in big water, not so hot in technical rapids and a real bear in a headwind. I own 6 other boats but it seems to be the one I grab the most often.
    Will Paddle for Food

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
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    3,753

    Default

    More of an "old faithful" than a thoroughbred, the MR Explorer 16, though quite stable, has slow handling characteristics, and turns like an old log. This can be a problem in fast water, though the royalex hull is built to withstand a lot of punishment. The MR Explorer is fairly slow on flat water. Not my favorite canoe, but it does what is was designed to do - carry a large load wherever you want to go - slowly.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  7. #7

    Default

    Admittedly, we have limited experience of open canoes, but my wife and I were so impressed with the overall stability of the Explorer 16 that we recently 'upgraded' from TripleTough to a Royalex one.
    We also upgraded to the aluminium IQ system which, in spite of all the slagging-off that the IQ usually receives on SotP, seems not such a bad design after all - certainly much sleeker and stronger than the plastic IQ2.
    One of the reasons we like the aluminium IQ, is that it came with re/movable bucket seats (again somewhat unpopular with traditionalists).
    However, we now have the ability to trim the canoe for a variety of situations, irrespective of how much or how little equipment we carry; plus we can easily add another seat when our 2 year old son needs his own.

    We are still experimenting, but one of the first things we did was to off-centre the seats towards our normal paddling sides, making it much easier to paddle. One thing that we would recommend, is to secure the seats in place with a set of IQ Tie-downs, as they can drift as much as an inch in the channels. No big deal, as we find the tie-downs very handy for clipping on camera bags etc. and incidentally, they do work much better on the aluminium gunnels.
    Another unexpected boon to the bucket-seats is having two conveniently positioned 'thwarts' with which to flip the canoe up over our heads when loading it onto the roof-rack. I can't be sure, but I also suspect that the bucket seats and aluminium gunnels shave off a wee bit more weight from the standard Royalex setup.

    I don't know if it's just because we chose the 'low-impact' olive-green Explorer, but it was really nice to be able to peel of the giant MRC logo.
    (We left the Rabbit on until our son decides that it's no longer required).

    I'm sure that one day we will probably get another/more Canoe(s) but, for the foreseeable future, our Explorer seems perfect for the three of us.


    Gil

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Stoke-on Trent
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    Default Canalvoyageur

    I think Pierre Girard has said what I wanted to say about the mrc explorer 16, I had one with the IQ11 system,and all the trimmings ie; bow, stern, and belly covers, tool box, glove box, chine bag, I also removed the bow seat, replaced it with a standard thwart, I can get me and all my gear in, I know I'm going to get some stick from fellow soTp paddlers but eh I love it. can recommend the mrc explorer 16, see acc pic Happy Paddling


  9. #9
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    Dec 2006
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    Default

    We've had our Explorer TT for a few years now and as a tandem she is very good a bit heavy but now the wife paddles a kk (a dagger blackwater and a damn fine boat) and I paddle my wenonah Prospector 15 (rigged up as a solo boat) but last year we canoe camped wifee paddled her boat and I paddled the explorer with all the gear plus our daughter and her friend (both 10yrs old) loads of free board left. I have paddled a Reflection 15 and preferred the Explorer, if you have to choose 1 boat for everything you can't beat a n Explorer. tho for solo I love my Prospector.


    PS I only can speak for a green Explorer obviously faster than any other colour.....
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  10. #10

    Default MR Teton brings big smiles

    First, thanks to everyone on SOTP for the collection of unbiased, real-life advice on this and other canoe models. As payback, here's my considered (if inexpert) opinion of the canoe I chose. I was upgrading from a very old Coleman, pre RAM-X, keelson'd and thwarted by a collection of dodgy looking scaffolding pipes. Had thought I'd be the last owner, but a mate wanted it so she saved me the trouble and embarrassment of putting it on eBay. My first choice had been a Novacraft Prospector, but they must be so good that nobody sells them secondhand - or the sell used for more money than new. Did I mention I had a 500 budget? After weeks of fruitless scourings of the eBay listings I was almost tempted by a Venture Canoes Ranger? Royalex, new but with 'cosmetic' blisters. Had no experience to base a 600 gamble on, so chickened out at the last moment.

    Then a Mad River Canoe came up. Had to ask the bloke to measure it and it turned out to be a 16ft Teton - Explorer series. I'm guessing this is the forerunner to the Explorer 16, with non-IQ gunwhales. The alliterative Teton indicating TripleTough maybe? Based on 0% experience and a LOT of reading, the shallow v, straight sides and relatively unflamboyant entry lines persuaded me to go all the way to 475 to secure it. That same week there was a 15% discount at Hereford Canoe for a new Explorer 16 bringing it in at 600. 100 over budget but I'd know all the scratches would be mine - but it wasn't to be.

    Anyway, I bought the Teton. It car-tops single-handedly and if I'm feeling manly, I can even carry it (but its a lot cheaper in osteopath bills not to - just get a trolley). Once on the water it is a dream! It is faster and quieter than the Coleman and it is surprising how many you see, especially with outdoor centres. Guess they must be built to last. It took about 100 yards of paddling tandem to get used to the unflatbottomed-ness, slightly tippy feeling. Apparently, upfront it doesn't feel much different, but at the back it is relatively easy to paddle in a straight line and keep the momentum up. Low speed manoeuvring into side channels and up to the bank has been a revelation too. I can actually control it.

    I have also been able to do a bit of solo paddling. First when I kicked my crew out for bickering. Thought I'd try the old heeling over thing - big smiles! It works! I panicked a bit when I saw the trolley, paddles and water bottled head towards the gunwhale, but no need. Loads less correction than when upright - but you really have to concentrate. I felt like I could have paddled for ever (upstream, calm, mid Thames). Second time out I was dodging university rowing crews (well, they were dodging me - you know they go BACKWARDS!?), so plenty of opportunity to paddle heeled over and do a bit of purposeful steering as well. Haven't remotely got it nailed, but it is coming. One issue not specific to this canoe is kneeling. The knees are OK, but I end up squashing my paddle-side ankle. I tried perching on the bow seat backwards to put me close to centre thwart, but it is either too high or too far back to paddle like this. Would a kneeling thwart eliminate this ankle squashing? I often kneel when paddling tandem but I'm not scrunched up in the scuppers like when solo, with all my weight on one side.

    Solo potential was one of the reasons for picking this model and, for want of wider comparison, it a choice I'm glad I made. Although it weighs about the same as the Coleman (about 80 lbs), it is a lot easier to manhandle, especially putting it onto the sawhorses for storage and getting it out of the water for portaging around locks. Finally, my 9 year old son's even had a go steering. We just spin 180 degrees on our seats and he takes over. He's rubbish, but improving fast and I appreciate now how powerless you can feel up front in keeping a course.

    Because the guy who sold it felt a bit guilty about how high the price had gone, he threw in a brace of wooden paddles - a beavertrail and scout pattern. That's been a bit of a revalation too - and really good to switch between them and see how they work.

    Downsides: Something a bit lighter would be nice - but you get what you pay for. Actually, that's it. I'm a happy chap. I had fancied a red one, but hey...teal's probably better for not scaring the birds away. Oh yes, when bought there was very slight deformation to the hull amidships either side of the centreline. This might be referred to as oil-canning - though the condition seems permanent. Pretty sure this is from previous trolleying as the pads of my trolley coincide with the shallow dents - or it could just be poor storage by a former owner. I'll never know whether it has an adverse effect on handling but I sort of doubt it.

    Upsides: Plenty of room and freeboard with 2 adults and 2 kids with trolley and usual rubbish. Paddles well enough solo for a learner like me to make some sense of it. Has a really cool pipe smoking rabbit on the front. It is a quantum leap from a thoroughly-used and slightly tired Coleman 15.6.

    Longest trip so far has been 10 miles into a moderate headwind. The current on the Thames counts for very little compared to wind. That was a real achievement, especially for my son who spontaneously high-fived me when we made the destination. I think it might have turned into a miserable slog in the Coleman, partly because of the greater windage, but also the hull-flex sapped a lot of the energy you put into going forward.

    Anyway, hope this is useful/interesting for someone.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cardiff
    Posts
    9

    Default

    As novice paddlers, my husband and I took all the advice we found from here and purchased a new Mad River Explorer 16 in a Royalex as it was more manageable for us, especially as we planned to transport it on the roof of our Audi A4.

    We had our one and only paddle up the Ely river in Cardiff which was a fun and enjoyable experience. The canoe felt safe, easy to handle and comfortable.


    Mandy
    Last edited by Amelia; 27th-October-2008 at 11:13 AM.

  12. #12
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    Dec 2008
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
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    95

    Default Mad River Explorer 16

    After all the previous reviews and comments, what can I say? I've had mine for some 5 years now (wood trim, cane seats) and I just love it. About 3 years ago, I added a center seat (also cane) and installed oarlocks halfway between the center and bow seats so I can row from either position, depending if I'm solo or have a guest who rides in the stern seat facing in (Marian).

    Once I determined the position, I attached oak reinforcing blocks about 5" long underneath the gunwales with stainless screws from the top and side. I then drilled the gunwales and inserted delrin oar socket inserts scavenged from a metal set which I didn't want to use on my boat.

    All you see are two unobtrusive black sockets so the appearance isn't compromised. A pair of lightweight aluminum oars 6' long completes the ensemble. As soon as I can find some light wood oars that won't break the bank, I'll change. She flies across the water! Great for windy conditions solo, as well.

    I accidentally found a one-handed anchor controller made mostly from wood which attaches to either end for fishing. My center seat came from the same box of misc. canoe parts at the shop.

    Canoe camping is like taking a truck...if you don't have to portage, you can take whatever you like.

  13. #13
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    Nov 2009
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    Tasmania, Australia
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    Default oil canning

    Hello. I recently bought one of these in Royalex. I'm concerned by the amount of flex in mine; concerned enough to start a thread on it in the General section of this forum:

    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...er-oil-canning

    Any word from Royalex users regarding your own experience of oil canning with this hull would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  14. #14
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    Dec 2008
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
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    95

    Default Mad River Explorer 16

    Yes, there is some flex and oil canning in a Royalex canoe. I don't know what trim package you have, my Explorer has wood trim with cane seats, which may be a little stiffer than aluminum trim.

    I've been out in pretty rough lake waves in two different 16 foot Royalex canoes, one a low end boat, and can't say I was concerned about the boat's performance or had thoughts they were going to fail. I've even run class III rapids with the cheaper one, going over 2' ledges with no issues. Royalex, like the less expensive Polyethylene can wrap on the upstream side of boulders, but that is actually an operator problem. (you have to lean the boat towards the rock so the bottom faces the onrushing river until you can extricate yourself)

    I would not be concerned, Royalex has been around a long time, and in a well-made canoe is a wonderful material where light weight is not an issue. The Explorer is one of the best general purpose canoes out there. The only problem I've heard of concerning Royalex only applies to wood trim. Extreme cold can cause the Royalex and trim to expand and contract at different rates, causing cracking around the screw holes. I called Mad River and they would not elucidate on what they consider extreme cold. My boat is fine, but it rarely sees below 0 degrees F temperatures.
    BE WHO YOU ARE: Those who matter don't mind; and those who mind, don't matter.

  15. #15
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    Nov 2009
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    bedruthan steps, cornwall,
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    38

    Smile we love our explorer

    having had our explorer 16TT since october 09 i have to say the more we use it the more we love it, before we purchased it we test paddled all the open canoes at an exhibition and we decided on the explorer quite easily, some people claim they are slow but we find ours covers the water very fast, even against the tide on the estuarys we paddle, but then ours is blue and obviously blue ones are faster
    we also like the dredded iq2 gunwales, we are making some spray covers for the big cornish waves
    I have'nt got time to sit on the computer allday! i should be paddlin

  16. #16
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    Apr 2010
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    Lechlade, Glos
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    Default

    I Have had my Explorer 16TT for ages and love it. Probably would have bought Royalex if I had the cash but I use it on my own, as a couple, with the dogs, day trips, camping. it is just so versatile... Maybe it is a bit slow - but I mostly paddle racing boats so not a very fair comparison...

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Bedfordshire
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    59

    Thumbs up Mad River Explorer 16TT

    I bought this and it is my first canoe and I love it!

    We have had 3 adults and a child in it on Ullswater and it handles great, even in some pretty choppy water.

    The V hull feels a bit tippy as you first ever get in, but once on board it feels a really solid, stable craft and having been a a few trips I have absolute confidence now, climbing in and out of it.

    The downside of such a big canoe is the wind, and when it is blowing hard you do really have to fight to prevent the canoe turning sideways on, especially being beginners!

    The plus side is that you can literally pile your gear into it as it can carry approx 500kg!

    We are planning a few weekends "roughing it" and being able to chuck in bivvys, sleeping bags, dry bags, and still have plenty of room for beer is a bonus.

    The bottom does tend to oilcan somewhat when you don't have any weight physically sitting in the base of the hull, and I have noticed a few largish dents appearring in the base of the hull, which are still there even when not in the water. But I have seen literally dozens of poly canoes with exactly the same 'features'.
    I wonder if a lot of this is due to taking it straight off of the car roof when its boiling hot, and putting it straight onto the floor or a trolley where all of the weight sits on these points and pushes the bottom of the hull in whilst it is still warm and relatively soft?

    Mad River 'reckon' if you heat the outside of the hull at these points with a hair dryer and press against them from the inside that you can push the dents back out.

    I haven't tried this yet as they are not that pronounced but will do when I have a lazy sunday afternoon when I can get it out on the lawn and will report back!

    On a calm day it solos brilliantly, contrary to what you may think with it being so big.

    I have also fly fishing from it, and bonus of having some space to lie your gear out a bit in front of you.

    All in all its a good stable all rounder, heavy to lift but once in the water you feel invincible!

    Life is one big road with lots of signs. So when you riding through the ruts, don't complicate your mind. Don't bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality. Wake Up and Live!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Default

    On the dents, if you want to read a lot about soft Royalex, go to cboats.net and read the "sticky" at the top of the Forum page.

    My understanding is that, long ago, Royalex was made and formed so it would be harder, but for environmental reasons (not using a nasty ingredient) they now provide a softer product. This was already true when I got my Royalex Mad River in about 1998, but it hardened a good deal after a season.

    You can't push the dents out from inside, because Royalex is a sandwich, and the foam will prevent your inside efforts from influencing the outside. But sometimes, patient heating of the dent will result in the plastic's memory returning it close to its original contour. The foam layer probably helps push it back also. Don't expect perfection.

  19. #19
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    Jan 2009
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    I live near Forfar, in the county of Angus, Scotland.
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    Default

    I've had my 16ft green MRE in royalex for about a year now and well chuffed with it. It carries me, the Mrs, the dog, tent, sleeping gear including camp beds, food, booze, cooking gear, logs, kindling, pike fishing gear, chairs, tarp and a plethora of other stuff too numerous to mention, without any major problems. It cost in the region of 1200. It was a bit soft in the early stages but noticeably stiffens after about 6 months.
    It's a fine boat for tripping, but for the rivers I have a MRE 14TT. I find the 14 more responsive to the turn, and also better for side slipping, and a wee bit quicker to accelerate.
    WW

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Chacombe Oxon
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    21

    Default Dents

    You can't push the dents out from inside, because Royalex is a sandwich, and the foam will prevent your inside efforts from influencing the outside. But sometimes, patient heating of the dent will result in the plastic's memory returning it close to its original contour. The foam layer probably helps push it back also. Don't expect perfection.[/QUOTE]


    If you support the boat upside down along the keel line and use a former in the shape of the hull where the dents are. Leave in the hot sun and then allow to cool over night. Repeat process as necessary.

    This worked on my boat to give the desired dentless shape that I wanted.

  21. #21
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    May 2011
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    Default

    The foam layer probably helps push it back also
    I think it IS the foam that pushes the dent out. I believe it is closed cell foam so when you heat the foam it expands back (as it was previously compressed) pushing the other layers out also.
    --
    Andy

  22. #22

    Default

    @FriendlyEllis - got the same 16TT myself only last week. Only had one trip out but impressed with stability and how well it stays in a straight line with minimal steering. Yes it does catch wind though.

    Bought ours used with two very slight oil can dents in base. I'm not particularly bothered by them either. Nice boat!
    Ukulele playing paddler http://www.gotaukulele.com

  23. #23
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    Oct 2014
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    Broadford, Skye
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    Default

    Mad River explorer 16 TT:

    Very pleased with new purchase as a big, stable 'family' canoe. Ok, it is heavy, but not that much weightier than my Venture Ranger 14. I can get it on and off the car roof easy enough.

    It tracked well, seemed stable and was easy enough to steer and handle, even solo. It can also carry a shed-load of kit.

    Pics with my son on Loch Long (Dornie)




  24. #24

    Default

    Mad River Explorer 16TT. Fantastic all rounder for 50% Flat 50% River. Plenty of freeboard, very stable, shallow vee tracks superbly. So stable you could party on board, you not going under when a wave strikes you. Stable enough for the sea. However its a bit heavy, the plastic hull is soft but there again its half the price of Royalex. Fabulous jack of all trades, better than an Oldtown 158, better than a Venture Ranger 16, better than a Hou 16. The shape is fabulous none of that retro last of the Moheccans throwback curved bow shape. Get one and sell it for what you paid for it when its time to move on.

  25. #25
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    Sep 2013
    Location
    Madrid
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    Default

    We have ours for about 6 months now. It is a good stable canoe. I like it. We bought it second hand for little money, RX with wood. I oiled the gunwall, put skidplates on it. It does not oilcane. It has a lot of space for all our stuff and the dog. It is a little bit faster than our Ally 16.5. Only problem I can see. It is on the heavy side. But once you have lifted it up on your sholders, it is very well balanced for portage. I can recommend it.







    Last edited by Reiner Wandler; 18th-October-2016 at 12:53 PM.

  26. #26
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    Mar 2018
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    Glasgow
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    Default

    I'm new to canoeing and thought about getting one of these as a first canoe. From what everyone says they sound just what I'm after as I plan to take the wee fella camping in the summer. Would it be suitbale for myself as I'm around 20 stone?

  27. #27
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    May 2011
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    Lincs
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    Default

    The canoe can easily take your weight, that isn't a problem. Not being funny, but what may be an issue is you at the back and (you haven't said his age) him at the front...he'll be 3ft in the air With uneven weight differences like that you'll need to move yourself nearer the middle or borrow another couple of little fellas to weigh down the front. I'm 12 stone and with my 7 year old in the front the boat is pointing skywards. It doesn't matter but the boat will be harder to keep in a straight line for a newbie. It's all part of the fun and you'll have this issue with any canoe.

    If there are 2 adults, heaviest at the back, other in front and kids in middle.

    If you sit in the middle there is no problem at all but you may want to fit a middle seat rather than sit on the floor. The canoe is perfectly suitable for you.
    --
    Andy

  28. #28
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    Jul 2008
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    Surrey
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paddleduck View Post
    I'm new to canoeing and thought about getting one of these as a first canoe. From what everyone says they sound just what I'm after as I plan to take the wee fella camping in the summer. Would it be suitbale for myself as I'm around 20 stone?
    A good all-rounder so definitely suitable, but they're no longer made in Royalex so not so easy to find. The TT version is tough but VERY heavy. There are loads of other alternatives though. Second hand Royalex canoes, eg. Prospectors from Nova Craft or Wenonah, come up occasionally second hand on here. Otherwise, the latest generation of poly canoe from the likes of Hou, Venture or Silverbirch would be worth a look, as would the Nova Craft SP3.
    If you're intending to mostly use it on flatwater (as opposed to rock dodging whitewater), then consider something from Apache like the Tribe. A composite material is stiff and good to paddle, and fairly light.

    With a large weight difference, I assume, between you and the wee fella, you'll want to think about how you trim the canoe so it isn't too light at the front, or you'll catch any headwind. Fortunately this gives you the excuse to take more bags full of food and drink to balance out the trim a little...
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  29. #29
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    Jul 2008
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    Lochwinnoch, West Central Scotland
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    Hi Paddleduck,

    If you are keen to try one out, you're fairly local to us so you're welcome to take the one we're selling out on Castle Semple for a coached test drive.

    Robbie
    Robbie & Steph

  30. #30
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    Jul 2008
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    Surrey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginger-Paddlers View Post
    Hi Paddleduck,

    If you are keen to try one out, you're fairly local to us so you're welcome to take the one we're selling out on Castle Semple for a coached test drive.

    Robbie
    Paddleduck - take them up on this if you possibly can!
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  31. #31
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    Nov 2015
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    Wirral
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    For trying out a canoe, you could swap seats and turn to face the other way. This will put you nearer the middle of the canoe and he will be closer to the bow. If there's a buoyancy block or bag in the way, simply take it out. Also, a spare drybag full of water makes good instant ballast.
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

  32. #32
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    Mar 2018
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    Glasgow
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    3

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    Thanks everyone, think you have all confirmed my suspicion about seat arrangement. I’m fairly handy so a seat move sounds ideal. I will follow this up with Robbie and Steph when I get up to speed on using this site(I think I need another post before I can message direct!)
    Really like the site and have been getting loads of ideas over the last couple of months so keen to hit the water, very grateful for the advice.
    Thanks, Andy

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