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Thread: Old Town Guide 147

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    260

    Default Old Town Guide 147

    Maker's Spec



    Length 14' 7" / 4.4 m
    Width 38" / 97.0 cm
    Width at 4” Waterline 36" / 91.0 cm
    Bow Height 19" / 48.0 cm
    Depth 13" / 33.0 cm
    Weight 74 lbs. / 33.5 kg
    Capacity 883 lbs. / 400.5 kg

    Maker's Write Up

    Our Guide canoes represent a breakthrough in design and construction, using a special adaptation of our PolyLink3 process that provides a durable, stiff and affordable canoe. With its unique cross-section and stabilizing chines, the Guide 147 delivers exceptional stability, as well as rugged durability. And its sharp entry provides a surprisingly efficient paddling canoe. Stable enough for fishing or nature watching, yet versatile enough for family outings - all at an affordable price!
    • Polyethylene decks with grab handles
    • Ash carrying yoke
    • Durable, yet lightweight
    • Black vinyl gunwales
    • Black blow molded seats

  2. #2

    Talking markS - Tonbridge

    I've just bought a 147, and having only paddled a Grumman and a Coleman Ram-X before this, I'm definitely no expert, but.... this canoe is excellent. I have two young children, and it is exceptionally stable. BAGS of room too. I got mine from a French Sports shop in Bermondsey (Decathlon), and it came with a seat fitted in the middle, which will easily accomodate two average adults.
    I can get it on & off the roof of my car no problem, with no assistance.
    I'm off down the Medway in it today with a couple of mates from work, so we'll try and chomp some miles in it, and I'll return & write more.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    8

    Default Butt sores

    So far, I've only one complaint and that is the molded plastic seats that come with it.
    For going solo, using the front seat to better trim the boat, the contour is horrible!
    Also a day in the seat sitting the intended way makes my butt sweat! no air flow and hot.
    I'm about to trade it out for a cane seat today, or just add it nearer the center for solo.

  4. #4

    Default We nearly fell in

    "Is it stable?" said Steve, "Oh yes" I replied "Really stable, as stable as a stable full of horses". We got in, and promptly took on about 3 gallons of water with a quick wobble......

    After the ropey start, we got into paddling in a zig-zag style along the Medway, through the town past the old castle, much to the mirth of passers-by, and out into the countryside. Bliss.

    Next stop - the DW! Unsupported, of course.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ellesmere Port Cheshire
    Posts
    61

    Default used for 8 monthes

    i have now owned my guide 147 for about 8 months now, and i am extreamly impressed with it, i have paddled on loch lomond with 40mph winds(not intentional) and also a four day trip with myself +2 and about 140kgs of kit, she sat a little low but performed amazingly well, i have solo paddled the river dee, and paddled in coniston with my iexperienced partner and our dog. So i can say i have used it all varities apart from fast moving water (not that brave yet) and has always performed briliantly. I do agree the seats could do with a little more imagination, the weight i suppose comes with the budget, but overall it gets 9.5/10 from me.

    She is well used now but still brings a smile to face when i open the garage and see her hanging up waiting for the next adventure (which is in ten days on conistion) lol.

    If you have any questions feel free to drop me a msg,

    Hope this helps some of you !

    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ellesmere Port Cheshire
    Posts
    61

    Default further information on the guide 147.

    The 147 first, she is a very stable craft indeed, a perfect platform for you and the family, my first experience was on the river dee in chester on a calm day, with my girlfriend who was new to paddling, if found it easy to control from the back and found a slightly shorter paddle a littlle easier to cope with, it track very well if you have a decent paddler at the front but not essential. My experience was on loch lomond with my buddy who is an experienced paddler at the front helping to bow steer which was handy, she is not the quickest of craft but hey who cares, I was on loch lomond about 12 months ago and launch by a little inlet/harbour by the village (i think luss) about 10 mins up the west coast from balloch, its was calm initially and the canoe apart from us to was empty apart from a grab bag and spare paddle. we headed round to the island of Inchconnachan (Colquhoun's Island) on the west coast in a little inlet some 100m from an un used jetty, when we cleared this and went out the southern end, the wind picked up dramatically, with whit topping waves which worried me slightly, the boat which i would say was a little top heavy coped exceptionally well, sideways on the wind and it wasnt phased, running down wind was fine and easy to steer, and up wind was ok but with two fit men it was hard to make ground, in the end we went winward side to the island and carried it to the other side for shelter and paddled back in, better safe than sorry, on the whole as it was my first hairy paddle in it, the craft preformed as expected although sometimes a litlle heavy,
    I then went on a three day camping trip to the forementioned is land this time with three grown men and enough kit and beer for 4 days. The guide sat a litlle low in the water but yet againe amazed me at the stability, as expected a litlle more work to paddle but i had every confidence, the island provided the first oppurtunity to paddle her solo, i did this sitting in the not so comfy forward seat facing rear, if ound this easy to steer and a little more work to keep straight, then i tried kneeling in the centre and agien the same reults, some of this can be down to practise.

    Sorry about running away with my sea tales but on the whole those are my experiences and i hope this helps, please done hesitate to contact me for any more info ill be glad to help.

    jim

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    8

    Default an update

    Adding to my above post,, again the plastic seats were terrible. 5 minutes and they were both out and in the trash. Added a web seat 26" back from mid-ship, and this trimmed close to what I wanted. All gear up forward and covered makes everything fine.
    Mostly used for fishing (fresh & salt) I got it used with a couple of near new plastic bladed paddles. Cutting both off at 4 1/2 ft. I epoxied them together with a 3/4 wood dowel plug and made a 9 ft. double paddle.
    At this point I'm happy with it for what I expected. It's not the best at anything, however, I'm finding it very acceptable (everything being a trade-off considered).
    Speed is fine, but not great. Manuverability is decent, but again not great. I'm very surprised at the stability in the salt with wakes from other boaters. I really get the feeling that 300-350 pounds and a good trim is a great benefit in this hull. With the solo front seat I felt a bit shakey, with the changes it's comparetively rock solid. The double paddle is awsome.
    Gusty winds and I have never been the best of friends. The double helps,,, a lot, but I still prefer light to no wind.
    Most of my fishing is at night and early morning and this is a fine fishing platform for my intended use. Comfortable, well manered, and plenty of room for my needs.
    I traded a Kayak for this and feel I got the better of the deal.
    If it wasn't for the oil canning and terrible seats, I'd give this a 9.75 for general usage.
    I'm not a canoeist as such, I'm a fisherman first and base the above on that line of needs.
    And while some consider it heavy,, it's not an issue with me at this time.

  8. #8

    Default

    Have got very used to my Guide now, took it out from Tonbridge to Maidstone (Allington Lock) on Tuesday. Pouring down with rain - all trip, and began to notice the weight after about 10 miles, esp. as we tried to negotiate the steep stairs beside the Medway locks. Being at the front I heard the rushing torrent down the boat of all the rainwater we had taken on, which probably doubled the weight of my end of the boat, much to my mate's mirth. The Guide 147 is a wide boat and it took on a lot of rainwater, beleive me.

    A joy to paddle though, and the quiet splosh of our paddles was the only sound we heard as we journeyed down river with Kingfishers and herons for company.

  9. #9

    Default

    The 60th Devizes to Westminster (not my 60th I hasten to say) looms ever nearer now, and the training is increasing, we've even had to break the ice to get in on the Shallows just off the Medway in Tonbridge - dead keen!! We've opted for the sensible category of the Endeavour - doing it over 4 days (34,36,38 & 17 miles each day) The thought of doing possibly 36hrs non-stop in my Guide does NOT appeal to me so over 4 days it is........ Having paddled 30+ miles in training I can see what Floatsum means about the seats now.... - I'm sure I'll look a right sight when I try to get out at Westminster.......

    We're raising money for charity - the Evelina Children's Hospital ( V.close to the finish)

    Please visit www.justgiving.com/d-wrace and part with whatever dosh you can, thanks!

    Keep on paddling

    I shall (hopefully) write a glowing review of my guide completing 125 miles of the DW course over easter - wish us luck!!!

    If anyone has questions about the navigation section of the Medway between Tonbridge & Maidstone, I'll happily share my recent paddling experience with you - it truly is a beautiful stretch of water, whatever the time of year.

  10. #10

    Default

    Another paddle I can recommend for you all is from Marlow Lock to Teddington Lock on the Thames, a total distance of 38 miles (stage 3 of the 4-day DW race). Absolutely beautiful scenery - you pass by Windsor Castle and Hampton Court Palace! Loads of cormorants, the odd heron and a few kingfishers for company. I think the Thames was quite high, as this jolly took us a mere 8 hours!!! Not bad in a Guide 147!!!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Hi, I hired one of these recently and put a coupla novice paddlers in it for a day trip. I also had a go solo. They seemed to get on OK despite a bit of a headwind. Some points observed and experienced.:

    The shaped and backed seats were not hugely comfortable. The seatbacks tended to induce bad posture for paddling (ie sitting slumped in the armchair rather than using the torso properly)
    The seats have no drain holes, so if it rains , you sit in it.
    There is no tumblehome so you clonk the gunwale if you 're not carefull
    It does seem to track straight OK, but when I was paddling it solo you could steer by heeling the boat either way (ie it doesn't track very well if heeled)
    Paddling solo can only really be done kneeling as you can't use the front seat backwards due to the shapiing and seatback.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rivers and canals here and there
    Posts
    386

    Default

    Hello paddling types

    I'm no expert paddler but recently got my hands on a guide and after installing new (proper) mesh seats gave her a go.

    Verdict - fantastic !

    ok - my comparison is based on the 17ft Coleman I started with but the Guide is so much lighter, responsive, faster (not that this is important) and very stable - still loads of room for kit t'boot

    score 9/10 - 9 because I needed to change seating


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Parkdale
    Posts
    97

    Default

    I bought one of these recently so I'd have a nice stable canoe to paddle with my 4 year old son.

    It's a great boat for getting out on the water and is very stable and easy to steer. Though, I wouldn't recommend it if you want to get anywhere in a hurry because it is probably to slowest canoe you can buy.

    The seats are okay but definitely the weak point. I don't like having seat backs and find them awkward. However, it is easy to remove the seat backs and re-install later if wanted. If your primary interest is fishing or photography I'd say you'll probably like the seats.

    The build quality is very good and the canoe feels really solid.

    The yoke is comfortable and I can get the canoe on and off the car by myself.....a bonus when canoeing with a 4 year old!!

    All-in-all I'd recommend this canoe.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Has any body taken this boat on even moderate white water say 1-3

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971

    Default

    Don't do it if you have to ask.

    A person that knows about whitewater could probably beat it through and dump out the water every 10 minutes but it is really a horrible little boat marketed towards rental places that operate on small sheltered ponds. While it may be perfect as a first canoe for a beginner who only travels canals and dead rivers like the medway it would struggle in class II and be eaten alive in anything more. It is really a fishing canoe that is not really meant to do much traveling.

    It is better than no canoe at all and has its merits at the low end of the spectrum but people out grow them quickly due to their limitations.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Like Lloyd, I've owned and paddled a bunch of canoes. I think I understand those characteristics of hull design and construction that make for the best behavior on the water. But I'm also a psychologist (retired), and I'm learning that it can be an exercise in futility to try to share knowledge about canoes.

    When I discover that most people who have tried, or bought, a 38" wide, 14.5' long, heavy canoe are quite delighted with it, is there any point at all in my sharing suggestions about canoes that might be a little longer, a little narrower, a little lighter, but a little more expensive? Is there any point in making people unhappy with what they have purchased? Or, finding that they are still insistingly delighted, risking insulting them by insisting that their canoe is an oinker?

    No, there isn't any point. Thrice I dissed the Mad River 14.5 TT, a very similar canoe, and no one rose to the bait.

    So, owners and paddlers of the MR 14.5 TT and the OT Guide 147, enjoy! But knock on my door when you want to try something completely different.......

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971

    Default

    For me, it is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.

    Some people prefer the lie.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Parkdale
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldpaddler View Post
    Has any body taken this boat on even moderate white water say 1-3
    I've tried it in gentle rapids and it was okay. Though it does have surprisingly little freeboard when two large paddlers are aboard. I think it'd be fine if you are just wanting to play around and don't mind going for swim. If you interested in more of journey....then probably not the best canoe.

    I've been happy with the guide for paddling with my kids, but I've got a couple of other canoes which I much prefer when paddling by myself or with adult friends.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbjim03m View Post
    i have now owned my guide 147 for about 8 months now, and i am extreamly impressed with it, i have paddled on loch lomond with 40mph winds(not intentional) and also a four day trip with myself +2 and about 140kgs of kit, she sat a little low but performed amazingly well, i have solo paddled the river dee, and paddled in coniston with my iexperienced partner and our dog. So i can say i have used it all varities apart from fast moving water (not that brave yet) and has always performed briliantly. I do agree the seats could do with a little more imagination, the weight i suppose comes with the budget, but overall it gets 9.5/10 from me.

    She is well used now but still brings a smile to face when i open the garage and see her hanging up waiting for the next adventure (which is in ten days on conistion) lol.

    If you have any questions feel free to drop me a msg,

    Hope this helps some of you !

    Jim
    This was my very first canoe, and it will be gone in a few days as I’m selling it to get an old town Charles river, (anyone who’s seen my other threads, I found one lol) however, we all seem to do the same with this canoe and head to Loch Lomond lol where same as you guys I found it brilliant to paddle considering the amount of kit we squeezed into her, I have however attempted to take this tho g down some of the white stuff and can only say due to (our kit) how low it sat in the water (2 x 90+ kg blokes) it really doesn’t enjoy itself, it tends to start undulating and scooping up water from the sides which then eventually sinks you in the middle to get washed down stream to safety. Or you can try and fight this and capsize lol what I found good though.....is to make a makeshift spray deck out of an old bivvi bag and bungee cord, so that when you start tipping from side to side most of the water is thrown back in the river, oh and half the kit we took hahaha we did take everything g and the kitchen sink lol 😂

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