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Thread: Gloves for Winter Paddles?

  1. #1
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    Default Gloves for Winter Paddles?

    Now that I have sorted out my canoe winter storage - and it is far more accessible than I imagined - I am starting to think about paddling during the cooler months.

    Keeping the body and head warm is not a problem as I am well versed in hiking, cycling and climbing. But what about hands? I probably should have searched the threads here better but I am looking for advice on gloves. I have some thin Seal Skin Ultra Grip cycling gloves (http://www.wiggle.co.uk/sealskinz-ultra-grip-gloves/ in black not bright yellow I assure you) which would probably do.

    What do others use? Grateful for any advice. (I have alrwady taken lots advice on here about hats etc so I know that it is worth asking questions).

    Thanks

    Hugh

  2. #2
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    so far I did not use any glove while canoeing. in the kayak poggies are usefull when it is windy and near or under freezingpoint and it is more the just a exercise of a coulp of hours. I think I am paddling in winter for 20 years used the poggies about one 1 a year. keep the rest warm does the trip for me, sometimes I use vaselin or similar on the outtside of my hands. that helps a lot as well.
    have fun

  3. #3
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    I've got some neoprene paddling gloves that are "prebent" to the shape of curled fingers but while they're warm they're a bit thick and lack feel
    I've also go some Gul neoprene sailing gloves that are slightly thinner and I prefer these
    With both pairs I have the same problem that they're a little tight, my fault for rush buying
    I've also worn a pair of these a few times with good results when canoeing
    http://http://www.arco.co.uk/product...n+Hydro+Gloves
    They work well canoeing because my hands stay drier, I'm not so sure how they'd do in my kayak as my hands get a lot wetter with double blades.
    I don't get on at all well with mittens or pogies

    Just my opinion, wait for a few more before investing too heavily :-)

    Paul
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    understand where I'm coming from?

  4. #4
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    If I'm warm and generating heat while paddling bare hands act as radiators and stay warm.

    If it's a bit breezy and damp I have some Sealskinz general activity gloves with leather palms. A good feel on the paddle and waterproof enough for general use but not if your hands go in the water. I add a pair of Tuff Bags mits for full waterproofing. These are thin and still gives a good feel on the paddle.

  5. #5
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    I use fingerless cycling gloves mostly. But for when its really cold I also have some neoprene fishing gloves.
    A trick i learnt years ago while fishing in winter (pre neoprene) is if your hands are too cold dip them into the water for a second or two, when you bring them out into the air they actually feel warmer. obviously this is only a short term thing, but can get you out of trouble if you need to use numb hands.
    Ratty (Russ)

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    Ernest Hemingway

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks View Post
    I've got some neoprene paddling gloves that are "prebent" to the shape of curled fingers but while they're warm they're a bit thick and lack feel
    I've also go some Gul neoprene sailing gloves that are slightly thinner and I prefer these
    With both pairs I have the same problem that they're a little tight, my fault for rush buying
    I've also worn a pair of these a few times with good results when canoeing
    http://http://www.arco.co.uk/product...n+Hydro+Gloves
    They work well canoeing because my hands stay drier, I'm not so sure how they'd do in my kayak as my hands get a lot wetter with double blades.
    I don't get on at all well with mittens or pogies

    Just my opinion, wait for a few more before investing too heavily :-)

    Paul

    I think you have 1 too many http: in your kink as it does not work .

    Try this one - http://www.arco.co.uk/products/14T0800

    scotty7367
    Paddle Faster I Hear Banjos.

  7. #7
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    I don't paddle much in winter, and don't have too much trouble with cold hands. But if I want a bit of protection, I use open-palm mitts. Fingers are covered, palm can feel the paddle, and if you need to do something fiddly, fingers can easily be slipped free without removing the mitt.

  8. #8
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    Can you get these? I know nothing of shopping in the UK but they keep my hands warm down to zero F. After that my toes are cold and don't care about my still warm hands.


    http://www.glacieroutdoor.com/index.html

    The website sucks but if you can find the gloves in person they keep your hands not only warm but DRY.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  9. #9
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    If you don't intend dipping your hands these are pretty good.

    Just use them with the mitten folded back until it gets too cold or you stop then fold them back.
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

  10. #10
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    I have found neoprene mittens with a hole cut out for the palm of the hands to be really good for cold weather paddling. I got mine on ebay.

  11. #11
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    I use some Tog 24 neoprene fingerless gloves that convert to mitts with a fold over bit at the back. There probably only a couple of mm thick at the most and don't impede feel.
    They are grippy on the palm and fingers (but not too grippy) I don't suffer with cold hands as a rule but find them usefull when the temp falls below zero and beyond. Being neoprene they are warm when wet.
    Paul
    Just goin with the flow

  12. #12
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    Take a look at the Lomo ( http://www.ewetsuits.com ) Kayak Gloves -Neoprene\Amara, £10/pair.
    Do a site search on gloves to find them, they are pretty good, better than the far more expensive kayaking gloves that my pal used on the Cheshire Ring Race and the thin material on the palm and gripping surfaces of your fingers mean that the feel and grip is really good too.
    Their sizing guide is pretty accurate ... mine fit like a dream.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  13. #13
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    I use these from NRS.

    Cheers,

    Alan


  14. #14
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    Another vote here for neoprene open-palmed mitts, they keep the wind off, keep your hands warm when wet, and still allow you to feel the paddle shaft.
    And they can be folded back to free the fingers without removing the mitt.
    Paul.

    Canoeing is a series of brews seperated by stretches of water...

  15. #15
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    Most of the time I don't wear gloves, but there are days, especially my early morning paddles, where my hands are too cold at first, though normally warm up. I paddle glove-less down to about freezing point, happily. The rest of my, especially my balding head, is well & truly covered up though!

    My first choice is simply a pair of thin "walking gloves" - the sort you see in outdoor shops. I also have a pair of Palm neoprene pre-curled gloves. I thought these would be good for really cold days, but I do not like them as I lose all sense of connection with the paddle. Even the thin gloves have this effect in a small way. The "open palm" idea sounds better, but with most of my paddling being on stillwater its not really necessary as the water will be solid by the time I really need gloves! I always have at least one pair with me though.

    I suffer more from cold feet when kneeling, but have mostly solved this by simply putting a thin piece of old camping mat under my feet, tucked under the back of my kneeling mat.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

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  16. #16
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    Yep open palm neoprene mitts are the way to go. You can get them from windsurfing shops and they work well keeping your hands warm but still allowing the "feel" of not wearing gloves and work fine down to sub zero temperatures. I personally hate wearing normal gloves, I'd rather have cold hands.
    These are the ones I have. http://www.surfstore.co.uk/mystic-op...tts-p-111.html

  17. #17
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    I wear gloves a lot in cold weather. If I don't my hands soon end up split and bleeding from the cold wet/dry cycle. That's just a problem I have to deal with in winter whether I'm paddling or not.

    Mostly I wear leather Soldier 95 pattern gloves. These are tough and very tactile, but obviously won't stand getting very wet. Current pair has lasted 5 seasons of paddling but is probably due for replacement. For WW I wear neoprene normal paddling gloves - same as dive gloves. In really cold weather I wear mountain gloves. I also have some seal skins but I haven't really used them yet.

    I don't have any problem with loss of feeling through the gloves. I just don't get what that's all about.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  18. #18

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    I'm a no gloves man as well!

    I don't like not being able to feel the paddle and it's not really cold enough in the south in my opinion!

    I can understand folk wearing them in much colder countries.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    I don't have any problem with loss of feeling through the gloves. I just don't get what that's all about.
    It just feels sort of "spongy" in my hands, & I don't like it! Doesn't stop me wearing them if my hands do get cold, its mostly that I don't feel the need until its almost freezing. The way I curl my fingers around the grip also feels wrong in thicker gloves, just feels like I'm not connected to the water.

    I think I normally wear them on white water, just too scared to notice the difference!
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    It just feels sort of "spongy" in my hands, & I don't like it! Doesn't stop me wearing them if my hands do get cold, its mostly that I don't feel the need until its almost freezing. The way I curl my fingers around the grip also feels wrong in thicker gloves, just feels like I'm not connected to the water.

    I think I normally wear them on white water, just too scared to notice the difference!
    The open palm ones are quite good. Windsurfers tend not to wear gloves as the extra diameter on the boom combined with the restriction around the wrist causes "arm pump". Palmless mitts are the only real solution.
    I bought my open palm mitts for windsurfing but they work really well for canoe or kayak paddling as well. If you dip your hand in the water the water obviously floods in but they eliminate windchill so you don't get cold hands as long as you're active. I've only used them when it's very cold though, other times I make do with bare hands (although I always carry gloves just in case). It's a personal thing I suppose but I'm with Mal on this one, I hate not "feeling" the paddle and the water.

  21. #21
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    And I'm another one for the open palmed neoprene mitts. I've tried various gloves, and find that the extra diameter on the paddle shaft doesn't feel right. Mind you that is with wooden paddles - which feel warmer than alloy shafts.
    Fran

    Photobucket stole my sig



  22. #22
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    these here look quite useful although i haven't tried them myself yet:
    http://www.chillcheater.com/aqshop/c...?id=2258&page=

    i use rubber coated work gloves, like these:



    i seem to wear through other gloves too easily when paddling. these are admittedly a very low-tech and cheap solution but keep the hands warm enough even when the fabric gets wet, offer a good grip and are really tough.

    unless it's really really cold i don't wear gloves, however.

  23. #23
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    Nobody then use "SEALSKINZ" gloves of any shape or form?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by laurence milton View Post
    Nobody then use "SEALSKINZ" gloves of any shape or form?
    Yeah I do wear the Sealskinz ultra grip gloves. Quite good as long as you don't get too wet. Pretty good for walking too.

    https://www.sealskinz.com/ultra-grip...black-grey.htm

    Ive also been wearing a pair of Outdoor Research Sensor gloves, which are pretty good and surprisingly warm.

    https://www.outdoorresearch.com/us/en/mens/mens-gloves/mens-stormtracker-sensor-gloves/p/2448810001007
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  25. #25
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    Thank you, that was what I thought....I tend to get my blade hand wet as I often immerse it...........

  26. #26
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    SInce the subject came up again, Mrs stinkwheel owns nearly every glove going.

    NRS rescue gloves are her "wet" glove of choice. Neoprene but with kevlar fabric on the palms. It's designed for handling ropes but isn't too grippy and as such, allows for much easier movement of the top hand on the grip.

    For super cold cinditions, she has some of the Glacier gloves yellowcanoe mentioned. There are closed seam neoprene and are totally waterproof. They would be comparatively easy to damage so we have a strict rule they are for paddling ONLY, not boat handling, not picking up stones, not camping. We found them for sale in the UK from a window cleaner supplies shop.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkwheel View Post
    SInce the subject came up again, Mrs stinkwheel owns nearly every glove going.

    NRS rescue gloves are her "wet" glove of choice. Neoprene but with kevlar fabric on the palms. It's designed for handling ropes but isn't too grippy and as such, allows for much easier movement of the top hand on the grip.

    For super cold cinditions, she has some of the Glacier gloves yellowcanoe mentioned. There are closed seam neoprene and are totally waterproof. They would be comparatively easy to damage so we have a strict rule they are for paddling ONLY, not boat handling, not picking up stones, not camping. We found them for sale in the UK from a window cleaner supplies shop.
    Thank you!

  28. #28
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    Reed chilcheater open Palm gloves are good. They are a thin material and keep hands warm.
    https://www.chillcheater.com/gloves-...ed-paddle-mitt

    Sent from my SM-T813 using Tapatalk

  29. #29
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    That looks promising....but not open palmed?

  30. #30
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    Laurence they are surprisingly warm. I use them for sea kayaking with a Greenland paddle where my hands are wet most of the time.

    Sent from my SM-T813 using Tapatalk

  31. #31
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    Okay, cheers I'll go have a look, thank you!

  32. #32
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    I rarely wear gloves on the water, but when I do I tend to use my dachstein gloves - thick felted wool.
    I used to use them ice climbing, so although they do feel a bit bulky on the paddle, they still give reasonable grip and 'feel.

  33. #33
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    A cheap and cheerful solution are the Aldi fishing gloves - cost about £3 and last about a season. Fairly thin neoprene with a fold back option on the thumb and forefinger - certainly keep my fingers toasty! Can't see that they are available at the moment though.

  34. #34
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    I do have some neoprene diving gloves, from when I did, I guess those would be the option?

  35. #35
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    I might be wrong (never having used them) but isn't wind a problem with neoprene gloves? I would have thought cold wet gloves plus wind = refrigerated hands?

  36. #36
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    Neoprene is closed cell rubber and therefore quite windproof - it traps the water in the gloves the same way as a wetsuit does, to keep you warm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lime View Post
    I might be wrong (never having used them) but isn't wind a problem with neoprene gloves? I would have thought cold wet gloves plus wind = refrigerated hands?

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianO View Post
    Neoprene is closed cell rubber and therefore quite windproof - it traps the water in the gloves the same way as a wetsuit does, to keep you warm.
    Yes I thought the point was that neoprene will keep you warm in the water but not out of the water (and in wind).

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lime View Post
    Yes I thought the point was that neoprene will keep you warm in the water but not out of the water (and in wind).
    It depends on the type of neoprene. If it's double lined i.e. has material on the outside then the refrigeration effect takes place as the water evaporates off. But if they are single lined i.e. smooth rubber on the outside, then they are fine as the water runs off quickly and they stay warm.

    I prefer the single lined, palmless mittens by Yak.
    Big Al.

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  39. #39

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    I get really cold hands whilst paddling. I use palm hook gloves, thick neoprene, fancy liner and pre - curved when it's really cold. They do limit the feel of the paddle though. I also have a set of lighter sailing type gloves but found them not warm enough. Alot of the gloves with a leather palm do not have any insulation behind it. Warm until it gets wet. Good for feel but not warmth. I found Toolstation do some bright blue waterproof work gloves for about a fiver - they're great in spring and autumn.
    I use full neoprene pogies AND the thick neoprene gloves for sea kayaking in the winter!

  40. #40
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    I don't like gloves for paddling 'cause with gloves there is no good contact between hands and paddle when wearing gloves.
    When I'm dressed well and warm, paddle hard and using wooden paddles and had a good meal I normally don't need gloves.

    But I have a pair of Chota gloves with me. They are made of fleece. The caps of fingers and thumb can be pulled off and sruffed back so that I can use my fingertips without pulling off the gloves.

    Happy fröstling
    Dull Knfe

    .
    Dull Knives are the most dangerous ones.

  41. #41
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    It certainly seems, wading thru' all the posts; that there is no concensus for "the glove", and I need to work at why my low hand goes in the water at all when paddling.
    So, it's back to my old neoprene diving gloves for now, when it's icy...................

  42. #42
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    When it's icy and you paddle without gloves it's good not to slide too much down to the paddle blade with your hand because the build up of ice on the paddle shaft may be a little bit sharp.
    Dull Knives are the most dangerous ones.

  43. #43
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    I don't like paddling with gloves on, generally don't need them but i have just bought a pair of these off ebay. ***Kosi Pogies/custom made/for kayakers/watersports
    These are handmade by Rose who makes them for single blade paddles also, with a stiffening in the cuff for easy access.
    Two layers of fabric, inner is silver coloured.

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