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Thread: Spoon Knives..................?

  1. #1
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    Default Spoon Knives..................?

    I'm looking at trying my hand at a bit of fireside whittling this winter and fancy a spoon knife. Any thoughts/recommendations on Mora, Svante Djarv, Ben orford, other? If Mora then double sided or single sided?
    I'm a complete novice (I have made a couple of stitch and tape boats but you don't need a spoon knife for them ) and any advice will be gratefully received.

    Cheers,

    Al

  2. #2
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    The Moras are good ,I have both single and double sided,the latter being good for bowls and kuksas.
    Seen some of Ben Orfords stuff too and thats really good .Whatever you decide on keep em sharp and they will do the job.
    Andy.

  3. #3
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    hi Al,i have the mora single edge but could never get a good edge on it,probably my bad technique, but i once put a nasty gash in my hand with a blunt spoon knife that required 8 stitches and could see the bones in my hand.Then had to drive myself 25miles to hospital.Be very cautious when drawing towards yourself with it,that was my painful lesson learned the hard way.I am very very careful using it now

  4. #4
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    I've carved a fair few spoons, kuksas and the odd bowl and my recommendation would be a Ben Orford hybrid handle standard sized spoon knife to suit your dominant hand. Ben is a great guy to deal with and makes fabulous tools. The other option would be to get in touch with Duncan Chandler at http://www.dorsetwoodlandblades.co.u...oodworking.htm. Duncan makes excellent blades and I own a few. The best one to start with would be a standard blade to suit your dominant hand.

    Drawing towards you is the way most people including myself, carve spoons and the like. There are other techniques out there but best to keep things simple at this stage.

    Personally speaking, I never got on with any of the Mora spoon knives. Their straight bladed carving knives like the 120 and 106 are fantastic and better than most others at several times the price but for me the spoon knives fell short. It wasn't till I got my first Ben Orford that things really started to take off for me.







    Have fun,
    Graeme

  5. #5
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    Wow! Thanks for the advice all. You've made some lovely stuff there Graeme. I suspect I'm more likely to whittle my own digits like Snufkin than produce anything of that quality (for a good while at least!).

    Are the knives tricky to keep sharp? I've had a look at Ben Orfords tutorial videos and he makes it look easy. But, Ben Orford I'm not.......

    Cheers,
    Al

  6. #6
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    Just watch Ben's videos and practice, practice, practice. It may seem impossible at times but all of a sudden it clicks or you may find it steady progress. Main thing is keep at it. Mine all shave hair with minimum effort.
    Chaste Snow-drop, venturous harbinger of Spring,
    And pensive monitor of fleeting years!


  7. #7
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    Svante Djarv, Ben Orford both excellent choices. With a single edged blade, one can push the blade with a thumb from the backside if needed. With a double sided blade, it's down to one-handed pulls/pushes only.

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

  8. #8
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    Another one for Ben Orford - carves much nicer than the Mora.

    Mark

  9. #9
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    Red Kite - those are stunning!

  10. #10
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    I'd avoid Mora's/Frost Spoon/crook knives. They're reasonably cheap ( though the price has more than doubled, since more folk started trying to make spoons!) but that's where their attraction ends.

    Part of the reason I no longer run craft workshops for our local woodland charity, is because they wanted me to use these tools for spoon carving workshops ( they also wanted me to use B&Q hatchets!)
    I refused, point blank.

    Anyway;

    As part of the training/planning stages for the above events, I asked Robin Wood to run a training course for myself and a small group of fellow volunteers. He came up from Derbyshire with his family, for a weekend and taught us how to make spoons safely,efficiently and in a very relaxed atmosphere.:


    I'm the one who talks about "using your shoulder" then giggles at the end, and the finished stuff on the wooden block is mine too

    Robin provided several examples of pretty much every spoon/crook knife available at the time, so we got to try them all and see which ones suited us, NO ONE got on with the Frosts/Moras.
    Robin also issued every student on the course with a Frosts 106 carving knife, which unlike the spoon knives, was excellent.

    I would have purchased Svante Djarv knives, I got on well with them, as did everyone else on the course.Bens knives were nice too but the SD's suited everyone.

    I've tried some beautifully made crook knives from "FGYT" over on BCUK but in spite of them being well made and finished, I sold them on.

    For my own use; I use my homemade efforts, as I've not yet found any that suit me completely, possibly due to being left handed?

    A few of my carving efforts from the last 6/7 years, all done with a combination of Field/bushcraft type knife, home made spoon/crooks and a frosts 106











    One tool I don't think has yet been mentioned; The Flexcut "Carving Jack" quite good but I'm not sure how long it would last and a bit limited if your doing bigger stuff.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flexcut-JKN9...0266931&sr=8-1

    Anyway, good luck to you and watch your fingers!;

    We all get caught sometimes/eventually ( I did this with an axe by the way, took the tip of the thumb bone off)

    Cheers

    Steve


    Now paddling Either a Gumotex Palava 400 Or a Gumotex Solar Pro 410c and LOVING IT!

  11. #11
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    I use Svante Djarv tools, which are superb. But I think are overpriced now. I have seen Ben Orford tools and they look the biz. They would be my choice now. Oh! And single edge blade,without a doubt.

    A very nice collection Red Kite.

    Dave

  12. #12
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    Lovely work, Steve. Never tire of seeing your stuff - the detail carving and kolrosing is just superb. I'm afraid I can but manage outline shapes and as for woodspirits, well ......

    Robin Wood has been one hell of an inspiration to me and I believe he favours the Hans Karlsson spoon knives these days.

    How's the skin carving coming along?

    Graeme
    Chaste Snow-drop, venturous harbinger of Spring,
    And pensive monitor of fleeting years!


  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Kite View Post
    Lovely work, Steve. Never tire of seeing your stuff - the detail carving and kolrosing is just superb. I'm afraid I can but manage outline shapes and as for woodspirits, well ......

    Robin Wood has been one hell of an inspiration to me and I believe he favours the Hans Karlsson spoon knives these days.

    How's the skin carving coming along?

    Graeme
    Why man you just need to give it a go ( not the skin carving) have you got a chip knife? I don't mean a knife for doing the chips, I mean one of these:
    http://www.axminster.co.uk/kirschen-...ves-prod22109/
    The 500195 is probably ideal for the kolrosing/detail work. I made myself a very similar one to that but for the money, you can't go wrong.

    Aye the skin carving and bone trimming's not recommended, the index tip is still lacking sensation ( a lot) and the thumb lost a lump of dead flesh once the dressings finally came off.



    Al T: have you made any decision on which knives you might go with yet?

    cheers

    Steve


    Now paddling Either a Gumotex Palava 400 Or a Gumotex Solar Pro 410c and LOVING IT!

  14. #14
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    Hi Steve,

    Nope, not yet but I'm never one to rush into decisions! In fact, "hopeless" as my good lady would put it.

    I am suitably daunted by a. the obvious skill demonstrated in the pictures posted and, b. the injuries possible .

    After the comments though I think I would steer away from the Mora spoon knives.

    Many thanks to you all for the advice.

    Al

  15. #15
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    Nice work on the carving but on the axe accident. Once nearly brought a splitting axe into my shin but managed to twist the shaft just in time. So just glanced the flat side off the bone and that hurt a lot. I would not want to slice/hack my hands with an axe. (Already hit the back of my thumb with a meat cleaver. While not actually painful it was very messy and I had to throw away 80lbs of sliced cabbage, care for the wound, clean the area and start on another 120lbs of cabbage. Not my best day in work and I got home late.)

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

  16. #16
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    I've just spotted a flexcut hook knife on Amazon for 14.50 - has anyone used flexcut tools before? Any good? I think they're American.

    Cheers,

    Al

  17. #17
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    I have a Dave Budd crook knife. I also have the tight and big radius Mora crook knives but don't like them. Dave also reckons they are not much good.
    PWC
    ___________________________________
    Know less, carry more - you're in a canoe !

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