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Thread: Trangia stove

  1. #1
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    Default Trangia stove

    I've seen this on ebay, are they any good?

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Trangia-St...item19c9c551ab

  2. #2
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    Very compact the way the pans, burner and base nest together. Using meths as fuel is nice if you don't like gas cannisters. Very quiet in use.

    But - slow to heat/ boil. Can be set to simmer, but it's a bit fiddly.

    I've got a Trangia set, used it on one trip. (I'm not much of a camper.) If I were camping again, I think I'd add a multi-fuel burner to it, although that would cost more than the orginal set. But it burns hotter fuel than meths, and would make it a lot faster.

  3. #3
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    I've a Trangia set and I use all the bits (except the burner) on my paraffin Primus stove(s)
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  4. #4
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    I love my trangias. I have one of each size the mini the 25 and the 27. I love the reliability. There are no moving parts and nothing to go wrong on them. If it is cold meths can be a bit tricky to get to light but once you have the knack it isn't really a problem and if you pop the burner and fuel bottle inside your jacket for a couple of minutes to warm up while you get everything else sorted then it is no problem at all.
    Meths can be a bit slow to cook on but then if I'm paddling then I'm there to relax and so not in a rush. As maryinoxford says it can be tricky to simmer on them but again it is just a matter of practice. You can always get a gas or liquid fuel conversion if these issues really bother you.
    Also if it is horrid weather and you are cooking in the tent porch a meths burner just has a cosy smell (if that doesn't sound too odd), it takes me right back to childhood camping trips.

  5. #5
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    Used one for years and would have anything else. Absolutely nothing to go wrong and you can tell how much meths you have as opposed to guessing a gas cylinder. True, bit slower but if I'm out paddling / walking I'm not looking at my watch. Excellent in wind as the support is also a wind shield

  6. #6
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    Hi,I have used a Trangia for ages and have loads of other stoves but end up using it more than the others.they are stable,have the built in windshield and lots of options
    using the pans.you can stack them to keep stuff warm and the frying pan doubles as a lid.People critisise them as being slow but who is in a rush when camping?
    My coffee is always ready by the time my tent is up .only takes a couple of minutes for a cuppa.
    The one you linked to appears to be missing a billy and the simmer lid for the burner- you need the lid to put the flame out-if you use the travel lid it melts the rubber
    washer. Also was there a pot grabber?
    I would get a proper Trangia as the copys are a bit flimsy.

    Edit...had to log in 7 times. So as the other guys said....

    I made a chopping board / drainer to fit in mine -bought a thin cheap chopping board from supermarket and cut a circle to fit and drilled some holes in one edge
    Last edited by silverbirch; 19th-October-2011 at 07:53 PM. Reason: forgot about board

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris241 View Post
    if you pop the burner and fuel bottle inside your jacket for a couple of minutes to warm up while you get everything else sorted then it is no problem at all.
    .
    Brilliant - never thought of that! I'll try it next week in Scotland (unless summer comes back before then!)

  8. #8
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    Great Stoves

    Well made and reliable. I often use mine at work as well as when camping and canoeing.

    Steve

  9. #9
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    I am a fan of the Trangia too,
    Though I've had/have just about every type of stove, if I could only have one it would be one of these !
    As others have said, not the quickest, not the most controllable, but nowt to fail, and the most stable/safe set-up around...

    Real lightweight obsessed meths-heads should check out the new? Trangia Triangle, a flat-packed, very light and compact version!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by samB View Post
    Brilliant - never thought of that! I'll try it next week in Scotland (unless summer comes back before then!)
    I've also found that in the cold if when filling the burner you intentionally spill a bit onto the top of the burner and the lip round the edge of the burner it is easier to light this bit than the main burner. Then this warms the burner as it burns, helps the meths vapourise and lights the main part of the burner. It was a tip I picked up from a forum somewhere and it really works for me.

  11. #11
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    I have one good in the wind love it

    mick

  12. #12
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    had one thirty years! bought gas adapter for it 3 years ago which makes itunbeatable in my opnion. you can cook in any wind conditions and its very stable
    nature is m X-box

  13. #13
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    Default Another fan

    Like many others I also love my Trangias, I have a 25 and 27.
    I like the fact that they are simple, stable and all parts are readily available as spares. Yes they are slow compared to, say, a Jetboil, but I'm rarely in a hurry. (However if I am in a hurry I'll carry a Pocket Rocket).
    Paul.

    Canoeing is a series of brews seperated by stretches of water...

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by chris241 View Post
    I've also found that in the cold if when filling the burner you intentionally spill a bit onto the top of the burner and the lip round the edge of the burner it is easier to light this bit than the main burner. Then this warms the burner as it burns, helps the meths vapourise and lights the main part of the burner. It was a tip I picked up from a forum somewhere and it really works for me.
    I beleive that's what its there for. Lighting it that way as a matter of course also saves the burner becoming clogged with the remnants of the matches everyone seems to drop into the thing!

    I have a 37 year old 27 and a somewhat younger 25, both having always run on meths. It's not that slow, but I dislike the sooty mess which gets left on the bottom of the pots. (Yes, I know about the "adding water" trick). I've been using a Whisperlite for the last 10 years rather than the Trangias - then I bought a gas conversion last year and haven't used the trusty MSR since.

    Wonderful bits of kit. Mike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike__B View Post
    .... I dislike the sooty mess which gets left on the bottom of the pots. (Yes, I know about the "adding water" trick). ... Mike.
    I don't, please share.
    DCUK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Potty Paddler View Post
    I don't, please share.
    Watering down the meths by ten percent reduces the sootiness and makes the fuel go that little bit further with no appreciable difference in boiling times etc.
    Works for me anyway...
    Paul.

    Canoeing is a series of brews seperated by stretches of water...

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    Quote Originally Posted by halfwit View Post
    Watering down the meths by ten percent reduces the sootiness and makes the fuel go that little bit further with no appreciable difference in boiling times etc.
    Works for me anyway...
    Thanks Paul,

    Mike (Potty Paddler)
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  18. #18
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    Just to add balance, I though they were rubbish. You cannot fry an egg because by the time it is cooked it is like leather. The pans, being ali stick awfully, particularly when frying.

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    I had one of these when I was a teenager http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ALCOHOL-ME...item27bf4437cd. I threw it out about 10 years ago because it was too rusty. I found it quite slow to boil a kettle but easy to use.
    Malc

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    The pans, being ali stick awfully, particularly when frying.
    You can get a non-stick version. You're probably right, though, that the meths burner wouldn't be hot enough for frying. I mainly used mine for soup or porridge, with the "frying pan" as a lid for the pots.

  21. #21
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    In the interest of experimentation I tried to fry bacon and eggs in the back garden on my Trangia, the frypan does get nice and hot but ali is not the best material to fry in, the eggs stuck to the pan.
    This doesn't bother me as I don't take bacon and eggs camping.
    Paul.

    Canoeing is a series of brews seperated by stretches of water...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by halfwit View Post
    ... This doesn't bother me as I don't take bacon and eggs camping.
    No hot bacon butties or fry-ups to start you off in the morning ... I only really get them when I'm camping
    DCUK
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  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    Just to add balance, I though they were rubbish. You cannot fry an egg because by the time it is cooked it is like leather. The pans, being ali stick awfully, particularly when frying.
    As Mary suggests, the answer to this is the non-stick pan. There's more than enough heat even from meths - and certainly on gas you are (sorry!) cooking on gas!

  24. #24
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    I have the none stick 27 with the gas burner conversion,which is my favourite stove .
    I use a Tatonka stainless meths burner with it, as a backup,if I run out of gas.
    reassuringly negative

  25. #25
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    We (well mainly "she") have done quite a few fry-ups in a Trangia: mushroom, tomato, bread, egg (+beans in the other pan). Don't recall any major sticking problem. To save packing oil, everything is fried in butter (!!) - maybe it makes a difference

  26. #26
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    I've had one for 20 years and I love mine - although partly its maybe a bit of nostalgia!

    never had a problem with it, nothing can break, you've got the stove and cookset in one easy package. Ive never notice it being slow, although ive not got a JetBoil or seomthing to compare it to, but as the other posters have said, im not in any great rush.

    Frying-wise, I do bacon and eggs in it, no bother, I use olive oil. But you can get non stick pans - which, thinking about it, might not be a bad idea!

    Thanks for water tip, might try that, didnt know about that - or the warming meths tip.

    But I do have a fondness for my Trangia and its seen me right often enough.

  27. #27
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    Used to have an Optimus Trapper. This was much faster than the Trangia I now have... Problem with the Trapper was the glass wool eventually got clogged and one had to be very careful letting it cool before putting it away. Trangia is more fail-safe, but I do get frustrated with its speed.

    Stuart.

  28. #28
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    Just had a look, you can get a non stick frypan for under a tenner, which is pretty good and possibly worth it. I've done plenty of fry ups in the standard pan but washing up would be a lot easier in a non stick it must be said.

  29. #29
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    I have used them since I was 8 years old (now 40) and love them. I have a prethora of stoves, including omni fuel burners (for my winter mountaineering days) but I have gravitated back to the Trangia after a recent group trip. I found using my "jet engine" of a omni fuel stove meant I couldn't have a conversation while cooking. It wasn't very social being that noisy (especially in and around seals, sea birds etc), wheras the quieter Trangia seemed more than perfect.

    It's already been said, no moving parts, no pressurised fuel, everything contained together, simple. I use an ESBIT burner with mine, because the simmering ring comes with a folding handle for better control.

    http://www.esbit.net/product-detail/...ol-burner.html
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  30. #30
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    I must admit I rarely use the simmering ring - but perhaps I should. When do people use it exactly?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PepsiMax View Post
    I must admit I rarely use the simmering ring - but perhaps I should. When do people use it exactly?
    When you dont want the stove going flat strap - heating up pre-cooked food for instance, like the 2 minute meals from the large orange supermarket.
    Or not burning yr porridge in the morning.I have my simmer thingo open about half way.

  32. #32
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    Default Trangia stove = high speed boil

    Many here seem to be saying that the Trangia is a "slow" stove, with a slow boil time. No way. I have a Trangi clone The Clas Ohlson Assaklit set with a comebines stove and and wind screen modelled on the Optimus storm cooker (similar in cincept to the Trangia 25 and 27). My measured boil time for two cups of water at 60 deg F in room temp of ca. 70 edg F is 5 minutes. Which is quicker than most alcohol stoves. You get similar performance in the field easily because the stand is very stable, needs no fiddling about setting it up, and has amazing protection form the wind. At breakfast, overnighting at a little below 40 deg F (ca. 5 deg C) I achieved 5 1/2 minutes to boil two cups .
    Have to agree that just about anything sticks to light Al pots, not just the Trangia ones. BTW, trangia have non-slip coated pans in the 25 and 27 series. I avoid it by not frying. A freezer bag omlette is just as good (probably better, as it stays moist) and leaves no washing up. What's not o like?

  33. #33
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    I sometimes use a Trangia with a Littlbug woodburning stove. When there has been a sopping rain and you just can't find dry tinder for the Littlbug, it can be adapted for use with a Trangia. The only downfall is the Trangias flame cannot be seen so it can be a hazard.

    http://littlbug.com/
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  34. #34
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    Like many have said, I have owned Trangias for over thirty years, and used them regularly throughout that time scale. That in itself must be an indicator as to the robustness, ease and simple practicality of them.

    Over the years I have added non stick fry pans, a gas conversion kit and the two additional pots at 2.5 and 4.5 litres.

    This then gives me the capability of a solo kit, up to a multi person capability and variations thereof.

    The gas conversion kit is great, although awkward to pack up, but does add huge capability in snow and very cold environments I find (not that I have had to cook in the cold for a few years, living in Jordan as I do!).

    The additional pans are useful but a little more thought as to the lids would have been better as you can put a 27 into the smaller pan and then the larger one around, but the lid does not seat properly, thus making packing a little more awkward than it could be.

    These however are very minor irritations at what is a highly practical cook set which has been used in a wide variety of environments from snow to desert, beaches to high mountains and varieties in between.

    the pans have been used on the cook set, open fires, trivets etc.

    Yes it is an excellent system and thoroughly recommended.

    regards.

    Alan L.

  35. #35
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    I have a rubber hosed gas conversion on mine, which as others have said takes a litle time to dis-assemble and pack away. Does anyone know if the later braided gas conversion can be left in sito or packed away more easily ?

    If there is no real difference I can easily live with the "faf" as it's overall ease of use and practicality os still superb.

  36. #36
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    Default P,f,l,o,p

    I have had my trusty Trangia for many a year, and I love it !

    Its light, you can get fuel in Chemist/DIY shop in any country,cook in, and eat out of the same pan, bliss.

    My only warning is, do not store the meths burner in the kettle, it will leak,and make the tea taste very bad.

    Keep it in another place, Have Fun.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushcraft paddler View Post
    I have a rubber hosed gas conversion on mine, which as others have said takes a litle time to dis-assemble and pack away. Does anyone know if the later braided gas conversion can be left in sito or packed away more easily ?

    If there is no real difference I can easily live with the "faf" as it's overall ease of use and practicality os still superb.
    I have the braided gas conversion - it takes a couple of seconds to unclip the burner from the base, then pop the burner and hose (which stays attached) into its bag and stow inside the kettle.
    Fran

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fran View Post
    I have the braided gas conversion - it takes a couple of seconds to unclip the burner from the base, then pop the burner and hose (which stays attached) into its bag and stow inside the kettle.
    Thanks for the info - With the rubber hose model and the smaller trangia - I had to ditch the kettle or pack the gas burner somewhere else !! it just doesn't fit !

  39. #39
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    Make a "Caldera Cone" for your Trangia. Small, light, super efficient, and super cheap to make.

    Here's a Youtube link. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerP7-aiEBw



  40. #40
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    Hi , my Trangia is near 30 years old.and its as good as the day I was given it ( a few rubber seals changed on the burner at little cost). Tad slow but hey. Regards Pepsimax's question about use of the simmer ring... I use it on my home made fish smoker..multi usage..I like that.

  41. #41

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    Trangia used to be the benchmark stove for backpackers but the world has moved on and left Trangia decades behind in some ways.

    Cons:
    Bulky
    Heavy
    Slow
    Aluminium
    Sooty kettle & pots from burning meths
    Gas conversion is expensive for what it is
    (None of the above is really relevant to canoe touring).

    Pros:

    Simple and ingenious design & set up
    Reliable
    Good basic simmering control
    Non-stick and stainless options available
    Good in windy conditions once lit
    Stable
    Range of sizes

    Had mine for decades and still use them for base camping and canoe touring. Can't imagine not having a Trangia around!

  42. #42
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    I have this stove - not sure what make or model,dont know if its in its original bag,says `grill` with a pic of a flame over the G, on the top of the burner.



    Made the small tube with holes in at the bottom of pic



    Goes in here to take up the slack when used in the Trangia without its own legs



    sits in nicely in here and pipe fitting just goes through hole in side if orange bit goes first.

    Then made this from a cheap kitchen board



    Fits in here ,no problem


  43. #43
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    Here's one I did earlier....

    An Epigas (coleman) Alpine and a trangia clone + some bent bits of knitting needle!


    View from below (assembled)


    View from above (partially assembled)


    Cooking on gas

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by samB View Post
    Brilliant - never thought of that! I'll try it next week in Scotland (unless summer comes back before then!)
    For years a trangia was my only stove - you can't go wrong with them. A trick I used in winter was to keep some cut slips of paper with my lighter in a sandwich bag. Pop one in the meths burner to form a wick and it lights without fail.

  45. #45
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    Forgot to say -- if you wrap the burner in two of the small sized sandwich bags before you store it in the kettle you dont have meths tea. ...

  46. #46
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    We have both Trangias, but with gas burners. Can't be bothered with meths.

  47. #47
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    My wife and I have been Trangia users for decades for canoe camping and winter camping. It's never failed us - not once - not even for one meal. To be sure there are stoves that use fuels which will cook and boil faster, but unless you're in some big rush on your camping trips, the ease of use and the blissful quiet of this stove make it a hard stove to beat in my estimation.

    Some people on another forum were asking me about Trangia stoves so I made a short utube video about it's pros and cons, and some best practices for using this stove. Here's a link for any who might be interested: http://www.youtube.com/user/PineMart...1/jdZEw-anygs.

    Hope this helps,
    Martin
    No one has been heard to say on a deathbed, "I wish I'd put in more time at the office."

  48. #48
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    Thanks for taking the time to video the Trangia Martin, also my stove of choice.
    Like the pot warmers too.....
    Well done
    TT
    "Access all areas, Under the radar"

  49. #49
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    Hi Martin, great vids.

    I too have a Trangia and love it, , but have to say, loved the montage, and great music. Some fantastic pictures there, you're lucky to live in such a beautiful place. THe UK has some beautiful places too, but Canada does look amazing.

    Like the music btw.

  50. #50
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    meths for me slow to start but when up and ruining its a winner

    mick

  51. #51
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    Love my trangia. Not tried frying eggs on it but it does sausages just fine...


  52. #52
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    I,m sorry but that photo at 2.30pm is just bang out of order.......
    I hope your proud of yourself !!
    "Access all areas, Under the radar"

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toptec View Post
    I,m sorry but that photo at 2.30pm is just bang out of order.......
    I hope your proud of yourself !!
    Sorry!

    This time of year, any photo showing sunshine and gentle blue waters is bad enough, let alone one also hinting at the smells of frying sausages catching you out on the wrong side of lunchtime!

    May I suggest bangers and mash for dinner?
    Pete.

  54. #54
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    On with it @ 5.30pm

    TT
    "Access all areas, Under the radar"

  55. #55
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    Coming at this from another angle I have/do own lots of stoves including modern all singing and dancing heat exchanger primus and Jetboil but never a trangia, have been paddling on a few occasion this year with Pepsimax and studying his trangia in action. I now find myself thinking what an excellent bit of kit and wouldn't mind adding a 25-6ul to my stove collection as soon as I get a new job


  56. #56
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    I bought a battered trangia kit with a tea pot for 11 on ebay recently. Needs a frying pan and 'o' ring to the burner lid to complete but have plenty of non stick camping pots/pans. Bit of a bargain and love the simplicity and wind resistance.

    Ade

  57. #57
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    There's a lot to be said for the military kit:

    1 - The Pots work over an oper fire or firebox.
    2 - It is just as windproof, rugged and reliable as the round jobs (25/27)
    3 - Cheap as chips.
    4 - Includes a fuel bottle.


    http://www.militarymart.co.uk/Stainl.../prod_392.html

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davy 90 View Post
    I bought a battered trangia kit with a tea pot for 11 on ebay recently. Needs a frying pan and 'o' ring to the burner lid to complete but have plenty of non stick camping pots/pans. Bit of a bargain and love the simplicity and wind resistance.

    Ade
    Pop in Wilkinson's and pick up a non stick flan dish for about 3, there is your frying pan
    All the best,
    Richard
    Retired bushcrafter now happy camper

  59. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    SE London
    Posts
    3,541

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    Quote Originally Posted by rik_uk3 View Post
    Pop in Wilkinson's and pick up a non stick flan dish for about 3, there is your frying pan
    Don't really need another frying pan as the trangia is primarily for making hot drinks but a good idea which I'll follow up.

    Cheers

    Ade

  60. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Wales Valleys, UK
    Posts
    446

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    Trangia clone with an Optimus 111T burner fitted





    All the best,
    Richard
    Retired bushcrafter now happy camper

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