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Thread: Vango Force Ten MK CN Nylon Fly - can it be reproofed?

  1. #1
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    Default Vango Force Ten MK CN Nylon Fly - can it be reproofed?

    Have just rescued my MK3 CN from the loft with a view to using it again. The fly is worn in spots and very faded so have bought a replacement. The cloth is much lighter than the original and is not ripstop - original is about 1974 vintage and orange. Trying to keep weight down as occasionally need to fly with it!

    The last time I used the original fly it leaked in torrential rain from ridge seam. Does anybody know if I can wash and reproof this type of fly - was thinking of using Nik Wax Tec Wash and Tent and Gear Solarproof combo and if so should I patch before proofing or after. Basically want it as a back up.

    Long term plan now there is another half to introduce to the joys of camping is to buy a MK5 plus and extra fly and some poles to create a an extension - always used to covet these when I saw them in the past. As most camping now will involve a 110 Defender it would be ideal!

    Many thanks,

    Sophia

  2. #2
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    Default

    If the leaking is only on the ridge seam you should be able to seal it with a seam sealant.

    Google "tent seam sealant" you should find a product and supplier

  3. #3
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    Default Vango Force 10 Mk3 CN?

    Hi,
    I like the old Force 10's, I've Mk3's of about the same vintage, however the cotton flysheets are orange and the nylon (CN) ones are green. are you sure that your old one is nylon?
    I've not had one leak from the ridge, but in cold weather I have had condensation forming on the cold aluminium ridge pole and dripping down onto the inner tent.
    One of my Mk3s was second hand from eBay, the seller had poured a bottle of fabric conditioner in with the fly ... it stunk and took loads of washing to get out of the fabric ... you don't want a wetting agent any where near a tent flysheet ... eventually it could be re-proofed. I'd rinse just with water if you have to.
    Re-proofing, for cotton ... the old standard was Grainger's MesoWax which has now followed the Dodo. Alternatives are the silicon based Fabsil or the Nikwax products. Beware of re-proofing nylon flysheets unless the product specifies that it's OK, the flys can have a "rubberised" internal coating which renders them waterproof .... this can be detached by the solvent in proofers.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  4. #4
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    It really is orange and made of ripstop synthetic (I think its nylon) - doesn't have a coating that I can feel. I know the lightweight fly is now green but I have no idea what the original colour was when it was launched (may be someone remembers) and my Dad almost certainly bought the tent as an ex-display model or in a sale as funds were limited when I was a kid. No photos to hand unfortunately as they are all at my parents. It has faded to a sort of orangey fluorescent yellow plum colour (over ten years of touring in Perigord, Causses de Larzac, Roussillion and High Pyrennees will do that to a tent.

    Unless anybody else has any suggestions then I think the consensus is try a seam sealant and adhesive patches for the tiny wear holes. Then probably pitch in the back garden on a sunny day and subject to the hose on spray setting to see what happens. Will endeavour to get a photo when I do it!

    Sophia

  5. #5
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    Good luck with your fixing ... please let us know how it goes.
    cheers,
    Mike.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  6. #6
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    Just some additional info for anyone replacing a Vango Force Ten Classic fly sheet who has the old model of inner. They have change the brailing style on the new inner and in order to make it work you will need to chase up an additional set of clips to be attached to the new fly. I only discovered this after I had insisted on a trial run pitch with the new fly - mainly to ensure that DH understood how the tent was pitched (he's a river cruiser man by upbringing not a camper and still doesn't understand tents as well as he could ).

    Luckily a quick call to these lovely people - http://www.sportswarehouse.co.uk/ who I bought my spares from has resolved the problem and the said clips are on the way in the post.

    On a practical note if you have an old (probably 20 year plus) inner tent look after it very careful the groundsheet is amazing when compare to modern groundsheets - seriously heavy with an embedded weave for extra strength. Basic brailing is in the form of moulded plastic/rubber loops which are well welded to the groundsheet. Mine are still in excellent condition, for bad pitches (read interestingly rocky/dry ground) and foul weather we always use rock nail type pegs on corners, otherwise just regular lightweight round ally pegs, nothing with an edge to avoid wear. Only down side is the lack of the inner mesh door which graced the Blacks Alaskan (may have to bodge something).

    On the only fly sheet front seam sealant is ordered, now need to find some a decent patching kit which Vango don't seem to offer as a separate spare. May need to contact them direct.

    Hopefull will fix this in the next few weeks.

    Sophia

  7. #7
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    My Mk4 has a more recent vintage cotton fly than the inner tent, the fly has plastic clips that that should clip to the inner tent brailing ... the inner tent a simple metal hook, still the hook loops into the tape loop for the plastic clip and it all works OK

    Vango kindly supplied me with a cotton flysheet material offcut to patch a small tear in my tent, superb service, well worth an ask.

    Fairly cheap tarpaulins from Aldi/Lidl or the like are a godsend ... put on the ground, fold in if required so that the inner tent groundsheet just pitches over the groundsheet. Protects the groundsheet (I'd rather hole a cheapy tarp) and keeps all the dirt/wormcasts/etc etc off the tents groundsheet so that when you strike camp it's far easier to pack the tent(s) away clean ... OK so you've a dirty tarp but that's easier to deal with.

    Mike.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  8. #8
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    Really not sure about the whole footprint business - was taught to carry an old cloth in a plastic bag to wipe off ground sheet and as I said the ground sheet is incredibly sturdy compared the modern ones. May look into making on which also fills porch out of damp proof membrane which is what we use to create the waterproof layer in our re-enactment tents as we have some in stock (very cheap by the roll from DIY suppliers). Problem is that unless you have a sunny day it is a ******* to fold cold.

    Definitely going to look into a tarp - as we are probably going to drive I might make my own out of real canvas or even some decent ripstop nylon if I can source it (occasionaly found on ebay but tends to be in 10m lengths which is overkill if nylon as would have no other use for it) - will probably consider a set of Vango Kingpins for pitching, lighter than wood. I have to make a freestanding cotton canvas awning for re-enactment purposes this winter and that will need 6 shaved ash poles - planning 3 widths canvas, drop to ground at back with back pole height of 6' and front pole height of 7', plus a lace on side panel. The new fire bench which is waist high on me (5'1" and a bit) is too tall to stand under lift up side of 7' high ridge tent I use as a kitchen.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
    Really not sure about the whole footprint business - was taught to carry an old cloth in a plastic bag to wipe off ground sheet and as I said the ground sheet is incredibly sturdy compared the modern ones. May look into making on which also fills porch
    Yes, as was I. But I certainly recommend a footprint, and having one which includes the porch makes a surprising difference to the usability of that area. Mike

  10. #10
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    Default Footprints

    My Mk3 Vangos have a groundsheets that are not smooth, they've a bobbly surface texture ... for better grip on the ground?? ... as a consequence they are nothing like as easy as a smooth surface is to dry/wipe clean of soil etc. Hence the cheapy groundsheet as a footprint ... and as it's sized to include the entrance area under the fly it's brill .... even better if you have and likewise floor a front extension.

    It means that the tent is far more likely to be packed away clean and dry ... and so it should last faaaaar longer too
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

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