Results 1 to 31 of 31

Thread: Emergency/overboard bag, what do you carry?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default Emergency/overboard bag, what do you carry?

    I've been thinking about putting together an emergency bag for a while that I can just pick up and throw into my canoe when I go for a sail. I'm thinking more about a bag for day trips here not for multi-day trips (when I carry everything that I'd need to survive anyway). Some recent events have brought this to the forefront of my mind again (when I was in a position where there was potential to have to wait out some wild conditions).
    I already have a small drybag with emergency repair kit, multi tool, spare tie straps, comprehensive first aid kit, compass, whistle, lighter, survival bag, headtorch, candles, spare batteries and stuff that I usually carry but I've just bought a 30 litre drybag to use and intend to throw some spare clothes, some food and maybe a tarp in as well as the things I mentioned above.
    I was curious what (if anything) other people carry with them for emergencies.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Exmouth, Devon, England
    Posts
    2,797

    Default

    Water. Funny because we're ON it when we paddle/sail, but clean drinking water is a survival must-have. Also, the ability to make a fire, even/especially in bad weather would be high on my list.

    Then warm dry clothes, and something against wind and rain.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    São Paulo - Brazil
    Posts
    2,930

    Default

    Quite apropriate for remote and/or solo trips...... or in cold places like UK.... But only when ww is on the way, right? Ohhh, I just got you posted on the sailing-canoes area!!! This is another case too I guess, since you can get a bit far from shore quickly.... Food and water as mentioned, and extra clothes...

    We once rescued a blown-away dinghie about 40km from shore.... The two guys were almost dying of hipothermia.... They were quite lucky we heard their screaming from our boat (we were sailing at the moment).... No PFDs, no whistles, no cell-phone nor radio on board.... They left for a quick sailing in a sunny morning and almost died at 7pm.
    Tony BR
    www.companhiadecanoagem.com.br
    www.canoacanadense.com.br/english.htm
    Past 20 years teaching Biology!
    Next 20 building Canoes!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Water. Funny because we're ON it when we paddle/sail, but clean drinking water is a survival must-have.
    Yeah that's a very good point, I often have a drinks bladder in my BA anyway but a bottle of water in my emergency bag is a good idea thanks.

    Ohhh, I just got you posted on the sailing-canoes area!!! This is another case too I guess, since you can get a bit far from shore quickly.
    Since I've started sailing my canoe I've been going out in conditions that I'd probably try to avoid while paddling so things can get pretty nasty pretty quickly but I think an emergency kit would be valid for any type of paddling as well really.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    ~Kirkintolloch, Glasgow
    Posts
    813

    Default

    How many days walk will you be from civilisation... It is easy to over prepare and take too much kit, rather than training, experience, and a little bit of nouse.

    There is a story of a 5* coach who only had a roll of Duck tape as his first aid kit, and passed -- he was a fully qualified paramedic though - he knew not to try open heart surgery ;-) but did know how to bandage stuff till the real rescue arrived.

    A good outdoor first aid and [water sports based] rescue course is definitely worth it.

    The key bits I carry are HAT, gloves, fleece and a roll of tape. That keeps me / the casualty warm and stops the bleeding. A throw line comes in handy as well.

    Philip

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    461

    Default

    My "kit"

    Rescue knife,throw line, bucket , sponge, mobile phone,change of clothes,bottle of beer, money for pint in pub.

    Only the last item would I consider essential.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    grange over sands, cumbria
    Posts
    931

    Default

    I have a handheld VHF radio but only tended to use it on extended trips, but after the epic that we had last Monday when Wayne nearly ended up being blown off to Arran, maybe i will start taking it with me every time so that i can keep in communication with others on the water when things start going wrong.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Hmm, it sounds like I may already be better prepared than some, maybe I'm being over cautious (although I don't think so). A marine vhf (and operators course) has been on my wishlist for a while Dave but as you say Monday did reinforce the reasons for having one. I'm also going to look into getting a flare pack I think.
    Last edited by Jurassic; 2nd-September-2011 at 07:38 PM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveS View Post
    after the epic that we had last Monday when Wayne nearly ended up being blown off to Arran
    What about a small anchor and a very long, light but strong ( say 3mm dyneema), anchor warp?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    What about a small anchor and a very long, light but strong ( say 3mm dyneema), anchor warp?
    Yeah that's another thing on my shopping list Brian, I think it'd be handy to have in a variety of situations, not just for safety but convenience as well. Ironically during the cruise that Dave mentions above Graham used his anchor to save beaching his boat in Ettrick Bay on Rothesay (to save portaging his canoe as the tide went out). I pulled my canoe up on the sand and it was already about fifteen feet from the water when we decided to set off back about five minutes after landing!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    On the Forth
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveS View Post
    .......but after the epic that we had last Monday when Wayne nearly ended up being blown off to Arran,.......
    Now that sounds like a tale that needs told, presumably you all decided to head off somewhere after I left?

    To answer Chris's question, I have on my BA(Yak) a scuba knife with smooth and serrated edge, a 2L water bladder, the 2 front pockets hold a Doug Ritter survival pack, and normally the other, snacks and energy gels. In addition in a small dry bag (2-4L), attached to the canoe, I have additional food (high energy bars, gel etc) mobile phone, lighter, other lighter, matches in waterproof container, tinder, lifesystems emergency blanket, led lights, £20 note in a capsule, small FAK with Israeli bandage, leatherman wave and or SAK I normally wear a drysuit, with merino and or jogger bottoms, top underneath.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    All good stuff, keep it coming.
    My emergency bag is really going to be for use ashore in the event of having to land and deal with an emergency or have an enforced or unscheduled stop (possibly overnight). I was in a situation on Monday where I wasn't sure if I would be able to get back and whilst it would have been inconvenient rather than life threatening I thought it'd be easy enough to carry a small bag containing kit that would make such an enforced stop more comfortable. It'd also contain things to deal with an emergency as well of course.
    On my BA I have a rescue knife, whistle, strobe and usually some water. I also have a waterproof phone (a Samsung B2710 which is excellent) that I carry leashed into a BA pocket.
    Now that sounds like a tale that needs told, presumably you all decided to head off somewhere after I left?
    Yes we sailed to Ettrick Bay on Rothesay and were a bit caught out by the weather, I'll tell you about it next time I see you.
    Last edited by Jurassic; 2nd-September-2011 at 10:45 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Eastern England
    Posts
    1,167

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gailainne View Post
    small FAK with Israeli bandage, leatherman wave and or SAK
    I was going to ask what a FAK was, but I worked it out: First Aid Kit. Logically then a SAK should be a Second Aid Kit, but that doesn't mean anything to me. What is it? (Its juxtaposition next to the leatherman suggests it might be a knife?) Also, what is an Israeli bandage and how does it differ from a normal one?

    Thanks.
    Ian

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    On the Forth
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by idc View Post
    I was going to ask what a FAK was, but I worked it out: First Aid Kit. Logically then a SAK should be a Second Aid Kit, but that doesn't mean anything to me. What is it? (Its juxtaposition next to the leatherman suggests it might be a knife?) Also, what is an Israeli bandage and how does it differ from a normal one?

    Thanks.
    Ian
    Sorry, FAK as you rightly said is a first aid kit, SAK is a swiss army knife, israeli bandage is this

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gailainne View Post
    Sorry, SAK is a swiss army knife
    Ohhh how disappointing, I thought it was your Secret Agent Kit!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    westyorks
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Wiesel. campers/GPS.map.knife. throw line . mobile phone.change of clothes, sleeping bag.tarp. money .

    how big is the bag ?



    mick

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mickcave View Post
    how big is the bag ?



    mick
    Big enough but not too big!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    On the Forth
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    Ohhh how disappointing, I thought it was your Secret Agent Kit!
    No secret agent would be without one.

    On the question of the emergency bag, it wouldn't be difficult to put together a day bag/rucksack, with some essentials, including a small gas stove, bivibag or emergency shelter, its not as if we don't have the room , this is also where some bushcraft skills wouldn't go amiss.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    westyorks
    Posts
    574

    Default

    all my fiends and I have a barrel for stove and cooking things


    mick

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gailainne View Post

    On the question of the emergency bag, it wouldn't be difficult to put together a day bag/rucksack, with some essentials, including a small gas stove, bivibag or emergency shelter, its not as if we don't have the room
    Yeah that's pretty much the sort of thing I had in mind. To answer Mick's question above in a non-facetious manner the bag I have is 30 litres. It's reasonably compact but I think I can get a tarp, a small sleeping bag and maybe a stove in as well as my existing emergency kit. The question is whether it'd be better to put extra spare clothes in (in place of a sleeping bag). I'll do some testing and see what will actually fit. I don't really want to be taking things in and out though, my idea was to just have the bag ready packed so that I can just throw it in the canoe whenever I go out so that I always have the stuff with me.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    westyorks
    Posts
    574

    Default

    One thing wee all have mist a head light , filling a bag is good but its knowing when to stop has you say you want to leave it full redye to use.


    mick

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    I've been thinking about putting together an emergency bag for a while that I can just pick up and throw into my canoe when I go for a sail. I'm thinking more about a bag for day trips here not for multi-day trips (when I carry everything that I'd need to survive anyway). Some recent events have brought this to the forefront of my mind again (when I was in a position where there was potential to have to wait out some wild conditions).
    I already have a small drybag with emergency repair kit, multi tool, spare tie straps, comprehensive first aid kit, compass, whistle, lighter, survival bag, headtorch, candles, spare batteries and stuff that I usually carry but I've just bought a 30 litre drybag to use and intend to throw some spare clothes, some food and maybe a tarp in as well as the things I mentioned above.
    I was curious what (if anything) other people carry with them for emergencies.
    Because I would struggle with hypothermia I would have a tiny tent, and sleeping bag, water bladder, mini stove and pan and the makings of a very basic meal as well(Pasta type dry ready meal). I also always have my mobile phone in a waterproof bag, and I now carry a small hand-held flare. Midge hat and repellant, and sun-stick always go with me too.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,062

    Default

    Plastic wrap, firestarter steel, PLB, Aluminum foil, knife, bug repellent, fishing line and hooks, compass, mirror, flares back up map in waterproof case water purifying tablets.

    this must be WORN on you at all times. Its a ditch kit used for the times that you lose your boat and everything in it. A dry bag in the boat not attached to you is not an true ditch kit.

    Yes extra clothes are useful..but if you fall out and lose your boat...they will be out of reach.

    Note I did not include drinking water..Its hard to wear that unless you use a Camelbak. Water is not usually a problem over here unless you are on the ocean.
    "Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing." WS-prophecy about internet postings.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Eastern England
    Posts
    1,167

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gailainne View Post
    Sorry, FAK as you rightly said is a first aid kit, SAK is a swiss army knife, israeli bandage is this
    Thanks! With hindsight, I should have been able to work out the SAK. The Israeli bandage looks very efficient. Is that standard issue now? Looks like it can be bought here: http://www.uktactical.com/acatalog/F...__Bandage.html

    All the best,
    Ian
    PS Enjoyed the Tignabruich video, Chris. A reminder that I was thinking of trying to build myself some outriggers before I got busy in the summer. A winter project perhaps.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by idc View Post
    A reminder that I was thinking of trying to build myself some outriggers before I got busy in the summer. A winter project perhaps.
    They make a big difference for security in challenging or exposed conditions Ian and aren't at all intrusive whilst sailing. I cheated and bought mine from SD but quite a few folks seem to have successfully made their own. I don't think they're strictly necessary for benign conditions on smallish bodies of water in well populated areas but make no mistake they are highly effective. I'm impressed with mine (as you can probably tell).

  27. #27

    Default

    This is cut and pasted from the OCSG website...


    For a sail in company across the lake to the cafe and in all situations you should always have;
    • A buoyancy aid or lifejacket with whistle
    • Bailer of appropriate size
    • Clothing suitable for the season and the weather
    • And a paddle
    For a 2 hour voyage on a familiar river or inland lake in good weather consider adding to the above;
    • A mobile phone in a waterproof case
    • Something to eat (e.g. cereal bars) and a drink
    • A drysuit or wetsuit if the weather conditions or the water temperature so require
    • Extra warm or waterproof clothing in a drybag (consider carrying a complete change of clothing).
    • An additional means of calling for help such as a personal day / night flare
    For a day sail on inland waters you may not be completely familiar with and in reasonable weather consider adding to the above;
    • Sufficient food and water for the day
    • A map
    • Pocket compass
    • Additional means of propulsion such as a spare paddle
    • Simple spares kit which could include items such as; cord, a shackle or two, cable ties, a short length of gaffer tape, a spare pulley block and a multitool
    • Throwing line in bag
    • First Aid Kit
    • Additional flares such as a handheld orange smoke and a handheld red flare, and / or a laser signalling device
    • A buoyancy aid strobe light
    • Lock and chain to allow boats to be left safely in the event of bad weather / darkness and while going off for a retrieval vehicle
    • Bothy Bag.
    For sailing on coastal waters you may not be completely familiar with and where weather may be a bit more unpredictable, consider adding the following;
    • Marine charts for the area
    • Marine VHF handheld radio
    • Waterproof torch
    • Anchor and short warp (a non floating nylon throw line can be used to extend the warp)
    • Foghorn
    • All round white navigation light
    • A means of reliably obtaining weather forecasts, such as a small longwave radio
    • White handheld collision flare
    • Small binoculars
    • Steering compass
    • Tide Tables
    • Additional items for the spares and tool kit such as, a small hacksaw and a small hull repair kit appropriate to your boat's construction
    • Parachute flare(s)
    • Sea anchor
    • Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) or Spot Messenger
    • Portable GPS
    • Inflatable radar reflector

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    632

    Default

    What about packing a Swiss Army Nurse in case you have to spend a cold night under a tarp

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve C View Post
    What about packing a Swiss Army Nurse in case you have to spend a cold night under a tarp
    Hmm, appealing as that sounds I think my American Navy Minewarfare Expert (Retired) may object.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    632

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    Hmm, appealing as that sounds I think my American Navy Minewarfare Expert (Retired) may object.
    I know what you mean - my better half might be somewhat miffed too! (worse still, she might not let me go canoeing any more either).

    Bet to stick with kit that can brought back home afterwards

    Steve

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve C View Post
    I know what you mean - my better half might be somewhat miffed too! (worse still, she might not let me go canoeing any more either).

    Bet to stick with kit that can brought back home afterwards

    Steve

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •