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Thread: Another interesting report

  1. #1
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    Default Another interesting report

    Just dug up this report. It relates to Scotland but contains some interesting references to court cases of the past, including one that showed that the river in question had been used in the past for transporting logs, therefore it was a public navigation (when the riparian owners were trying to claim that it wasn't). Also some interesting figures for economic contribution, even if this was around 2003.
    http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/outdoo...pact_study.pdf

  2. #2
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    Default Hmmm

    So as many Welsh rivers had coracles designed specifically and named for each river, although the netting rights have mainly gone, is that a demonstration of public navigation?
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Potty Paddler View Post
    So as many Welsh rivers had coracles designed specifically and named for each river, although the netting rights have mainly gone, is that a demonstration of public navigation?
    Not necessar8ily because those would have been licensed salmon /sea trout fisherman and would have had permission from the riparian owner or landowner to be on the river.
    http://www.davidwperry.blogspot.co.uk/

  4. #4
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    Default

    Coracles have probably been on the rivers a lot long than country landowners. Will have to dig out the info from the coracle museum near Cardigan as to how long they haave been used down there.

  5. #5
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    My understanding is that coracles are one of the UK's oldest form of boat. Though I am usually wrong.

    The extensive use of Coracles (along with the fact that there are plenty of old or converted boat houses) along the Teme are one reason why I do not know why the fishermen on that river think that it isn't an open navigation. Even funnier is that the most disputed part of the Teme is the section from Powick Mill to the confluence with the Severn, the one stretch of river that was very clearly used for goods transport!

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