Results 1 to 32 of 32

Thread: C-Tug revisited

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    On the Banks of the Ol' Hérault
    Posts
    1,048

    Default C-Tug revisited

    Well, I've had a new C-Tug trolley for a few months now. It's as good as the old one (which we still use) for speed and ease of fastening, and for sturdiness. It shares the old one's feeble leg. It's not bad.

    But it has the "sandhopper" wheels, which I don't think are so good an idea. They're quite wide, solid plastic wheels, with a broad, ribbed rim. It's true they're not going to puncture or deflate, but I don't find them as easy to use in practice over our mix of asphalt, dried earth and stones.

    They seem to be "stickier" on the ground, needing more pulling than with the pneumatic tyres on the older model. Worse, they lack the "suspension" of the bouncier tyres. This means that the trolley is much more easily thrown off course, skewed, and sometimes stopped by stones and other impediments. The broader rims, combined with this lack of bounce also tip the canoe over more readily on the sideways slope of the track down to the river.

    So the new-style wheels might be good on sand (not really tried that) but I'd much rather have the jolly, bouncy pneumatic jobs. Perhaps we need to buy some, but that's more expense on an already costly bit of kit.

    But the trolleys still ... ok.

    dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bridgewater Canal, Cheshire
    Posts
    1,541

    Default

    I have a C-Tug and the sandhoppers are OK on wet sand, but on hard surfaces and rippled sand they shake the boat to bits and get stuck at pebbled and kerbs. I replaced them with foam filled puncture free wheels from ebay (10" 260x85mm puncture proof -flat free wheel, 25mm plain bore). Definitely not a cheap option (£32!) but works very well. I use the C-tug for my sailing canoe and sea kayaks. It is good but I think at the final price, better is available. I also put dry lube on the axles as the main failure mode is melting of the axle/hub on long portages.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,704

    Default

    Agreed, get yourself some of the solid foam puncture free ones. Mine were a bit less (£20?) but are bright yellow and red!
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bridgewater Canal, Cheshire
    Posts
    1,541

    Default

    I found real difficulty in getting the wheels with 25mm hubs. Of course, this was after I had sold my lathe!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    704

    Default

    I bought a C Tug on advice (expensive) but having now used it, seems to be quite good and robust. Packs very? small and as flat as can be in the canoe. Nice and light, and a doddle to assemble. Maintenance free, and works well it seems having dragged it several hundred yards over grass and rabbit holes. I placed it beneath a thwart and wrapped the securing straps around the thwart to hold it in place (for'ard/aft) and away you go. Original wheels, not the Sandhoppers.............

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,704

    Default

    My C-tug has proven to be excellent, very stable and easy to attach to the canoe. It pulled a fully laden canoe a mile over Scottish hill Landrover tracks, and then a further 4 miles with an empty canoe on similar hilly terrain. My slight concern about over heating axles proved entirely unfounded, and the only disadvantage when over laden proved to be a horrible squeal, which is fine when a normal load is applied.

    To make it really secure, I added extra straps for rough terrain, looping them through the holes in the "pads" on which the hull sits, and pulling them fore and back to the next thwart along, so forward and aft movement was not possible. Absolutely solid.

    Last edited by Mal Grey; 12th-June-2016 at 09:50 AM.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southport, really in Lancashire, UK
    Posts
    2,042

    Default

    My friend has a C-tug and frequently cools the axles with water, when portaging a heavily laden sea kayak. Sometimes he has to wait a while to allow cooling.

    Doug
    When there's trouble on shore, there's peace on the wave,
    Afloat in the White Canoe.
    Alan Sullivan


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,704

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dougoutcanoe View Post
    My friend has a C-tug and frequently cools the axles with water, when portaging a heavily laden sea kayak. Sometimes he has to wait a while to allow cooling.

    Doug
    Is this because he's noticed a problem, or just as a precaution? We did chuck some water over the axles when they were squealing a lot, but it didn't seem to make any difference, and there was no sign of any damage, melting or whatever on the axles even after 4 hours or so of trolleying.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southport, really in Lancashire, UK
    Posts
    2,042

    Default

    Quote: Is this because he's noticed a problem, or just as a precaution? We did chuck some water over the axles when they were squealing a lot, but it didn't seem to make any difference, and there was no sign of any damage, melting or whatever on the axles even after 4 hours or so of trolleying.
    Quote from Mal Grey


    He is concerned about melting the plastic wheels around the axle. But trolleying time is quite short only minutes not hours.

    Doug
    When there's trouble on shore, there's peace on the wave,
    Afloat in the White Canoe.
    Alan Sullivan


  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    875

    Default

    Is this because he's noticed a problem, or just as a precaution
    Being the friend Doug mentions, I will explain! On some of our sea kayak trips, we trolley the boats onto a ferry, off at the other end and are then self contained, carrying the trolley in the kayak. The standard C-Tug wheels take up a lot of space in the kayak, space which is needed for tent, food, water and other beverages, so I bought some smaller wheels. These are only half the width, so only bear on half the axle, the greater pressure resulting in more heat but with only half the area to disperse it, which melted the nylon surface of the axle. I've now turned the nylon down and fitted an aluminium alloy tube over it; the wheel now runs on the alloy, which does get warm. As a precaution against further trouble, I try to keep it within the kind of temperature I can touch.

    I have heard of others having problems on long portages with loaded kayaks, even using the standard C-tug wheels, but I think my problems stem from trying to be too clever and using smaller wheels.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Amersham
    Posts
    657

    Default

    https://www.c-tug.com/products/sandtrakz/ Anyone tried these, bit pricey.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    704

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mark steel View Post
    https://www.c-tug.com/products/sandtrakz/ Anyone tried these, bit pricey.
    Top of this thread?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    875

    Default

    Top of this thread?
    No, I don't think so - as I understood it, the OP was about the solid rim plastic wheels.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    704

    Default

    Ah, quite right, my apologies, I thought it WAS about those!
    Last edited by laurence milton; 12th-June-2016 at 06:05 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Amersham
    Posts
    657

    Default

    I have sandhoppers at present, not sure if the new sandtrakz would be worth the investment and would they fit through the hatches on my sea kayaks.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
    Posts
    279

    Default

    They look quite low... How do people find the height?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    704

    Default

    The c tug generally works fine. I'm 6 foot 4.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    875

    Default

    They look quite low... How do people find the height?
    The wheels are under the support pads, which makes the C-Tug one of the higher trolleys I've seen / used, and I don't have any problem with the height.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Devon ..just up from the bottom and right a bit.
    Posts
    2,384

    Default

    Love my C Tug.. And it's bouncy wheels.. Soft sand and rocks..bring it on..

  20. #20

    Default C-tug wheels - pumping up

    I have had a C-tug trolley for a number of years and found it just what was wanted in terms of overall size and the ability to dismantle it for carriage on the boat. The only problem was difficulty in attaching an air hose to keep the tyres well up to pressure thus minimizing the likelihood of a puncture.

    The existing valve stem does not project much from the wheel inner but this can be overcome by adding a right-angled valve extender (much favored by motorcyclists I believe).

    As an example see:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/13183...ype=pla&crdt=0

    Hope this helps

    Alan

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
    Posts
    279

    Default

    "The c tug generally works fine. I'm 6 foot 4."

    "The wheels are under the support pads, which makes the C-Tug one of the higher trolleys I've seen / used, and I don't have any problem with the height."

    I ended up buying an Eckla XL... and having helped someone with a C-Tug pull their boat up the beach at the weekend I am certain I made the right choice.

    The C-tug does seem solidly built and nestles the boat nicely, but the strap doesn't seem very good (we couldn't work out how to tighten it properly), it is comparatively low and the wheel pulling action compared to the Eckla is nowhere near as nice.

    The Eckla XL has a lovely easy smooth pulling action, is very solidly built (I have now used it with a fully laden boat over long portages on forest tracks (read v. lumpy stone) and is much higher which is easier on the back over distance. It doesn't pack down as small which might be a disadvantage (or an advantage if you use the wheels as additional buoyancy!)... but I know which I would rather have on a long portage over difficult terrain.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Amersham
    Posts
    657

    Default

    On the C-tug push the strap through the slot and then under the catch.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mark steel View Post
    On the C-tug push the strap through the slot and then under the catch.
    Yes we got that bit! The problem was partly that there wasn't enough strap to pull through and get a hold off on the other end (e.g. enough "tail") and the other was the design of the catch pushes the strap back through the "wrong way" (e.g. the catch naturally loosens the strap rather than tightens it). Having said that you don't even get a strap with the Eckla and they are similarly priced!

    I really want to like the c-tug but it seems to me that it is more form over function... whereas the Eckla just works.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,704

    Default

    You can add additional 25mm straps to the C-Tug easily, I agree the supplied strap only works for short distances and smooth surfaces.



    As I see it, these are the pros and cons of C-Tug versus Ekla, the quality of both being in my view high.


    C-Tug

    Pros
    Stable due to low height
    With extra straps, very easy to stop load moving, due to grippy pads and shape.
    Compact, fits into dry bags or whatever
    Can't get punctures with the solid wheels
    Rolls better than expected on the solid wheels
    Easy to load with its low height and folding leg, especially if you're on your own.

    Cons
    A bit heavier
    Plastic-on-plastic wheel/axle doesn't seem ideal (though my own usage has shown it works fine with heavy loads, but can squeal!)
    Solid wheels don't roll as well over gravel, compared with trad tyres.
    Strap is basic.


    Ekla

    Pros
    Light
    Folds flat
    Wheels run very well
    Extra height means less bending if two people are pushing/pulling it so canoe level

    Cons
    Quite big when folded, awkward shape to get in bags.
    Tyres get punctured, and are a real pain to get on and off, and to attach pump to valve. (get solid foam tyres from ebay, but this is an extra £20 ish)
    Less stable over bumpy terrain
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    You can add additional 25mm straps to the C-Tug easily, I agree the supplied strap only works for short distances and smooth surfaces.



    As I see it, these are the pros and cons of C-Tug versus Ekla, the quality of both being in my view high.


    C-Tug

    Pros
    Stable due to low height
    With extra straps, very easy to stop load moving, due to grippy pads and shape.
    Compact, fits into dry bags or whatever
    Can't get punctures with the solid wheels
    Rolls better than expected on the solid wheels
    Easy to load with its low height and folding leg, especially if you're on your own.

    Cons
    A bit heavier
    Plastic-on-plastic wheel/axle doesn't seem ideal (though my own usage has shown it works fine with heavy loads, but can squeal!)
    Solid wheels don't roll as well over gravel, compared with trad tyres.
    Strap is basic.


    Ekla

    Pros
    Light
    Folds flat
    Wheels run very well
    Extra height means less bending if two people are pushing/pulling it so canoe level

    Cons
    Quite big when folded, awkward shape to get in bags.
    Tyres get punctured, and are a real pain to get on and off, and to attach pump to valve. (get solid foam tyres from ebay, but this is an extra £20 ish)
    Less stable over bumpy terrain

    Seems pretty fair although I personally have found the Eckla very stable even over rough terrain (but it is the extra large version with the massive wheels).

    I do live in fear of a puncture and was thinking of looking into whatever cyclist's use for emergency repairs... if anyone has any recommendations?

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,704

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lime View Post
    Seems pretty fair although I personally have found the Eckla very stable even over rough terrain (but it is the extra large version with the massive wheels).

    I do live in fear of a puncture and was thinking of looking into whatever cyclist's use for emergency repairs... if anyone has any recommendations?
    You could repair with a cycle repair patch, either the old type using glue, or the more modern sticky ones. The hardest bit is getting the tyre off the rim, would be a pain in the field. I've also experienced numerous "blow outs" of such inner tubes, so would recommend carrying a spare tube on longer trips. I've also seen the actual tyre taken out by the exploding inner tube twice, once mine, once on our Easter trip, bad enough to be difficult if not impossible to repair. Also make sure any pump carried can be attached to the valve when on the wheel, some are too bulky around the pump head, the old fashioned ones with a "hose" on the end can be easier.
    Or you could buy the aforementioned solid foam tyres which look the same and can't be punctured. This is what I did after my 3rd puncture on my old trolley.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Ramsbottom - Tups ass
    Posts
    226

    Default

    If the wheel is not tubeless you could try a slime tube or put the slime in to an existing tube I run slime tubes on my mountain bike --no more punctures-- unless you slice a tyre and tube, then the gaffer tape will have to come out for the tube.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Teignmouth Devon
    Posts
    419

    Default

    I bought one of these

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Heavy-Duty...oAAOSwMORW7Bbm


    not used it in anger yet as I prefer to carry the boat for short distances but it seemed fine on my gravel drive I went for solid wheels because I get fed up replacing tyres and tubes they don't seem to last long these days.

    Dave
    Many shores i have sailed to in my canoe,often against strong winds.Choose the tree well my brother if it is to carry you to distant shores. :- Chief Dan George

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    On the Banks of the Ol' Hérault
    Posts
    1,048

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lime View Post
    the design of the catch pushes the strap back through the "wrong way" (e.g. the catch naturally loosens the strap rather than tightens it).
    Yes. I found that at first. Until I fed the end of the free strap through the slot where the "buckle" joins the other strap (passing the loose end under the buckle). You can then feed the strap the other way through the catch, pulling it tight, and when the catch closes, it pulls it even tighter.

    Of course, this uses a bit more strap than just feeding through, and if you already find it short...

    dave

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aero View Post
    Yes. I found that at first. Until I fed the end of the free strap through the slot where the "buckle" joins the other strap (passing the loose end under the buckle). You can then feed the strap the other way through the catch, pulling it tight, and when the catch closes, it pulls it even tighter.

    Of course, this uses a bit more strap than just feeding through, and if you already find it short...

    dave
    Glad I wasn't just being thick! It wasn't my c-tug... I was helping someone else whilst standing waist deep in cold water in leaky "dry" trousers so I probably didn't give it too much thought (that's my excuse anyway)

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    36

    Default

    got a c-tug, and found these wheels for it :

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07GYLLCFP

    they are a perfect fit

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    704

    Default

    The standard wheels are quite good on soft going......but they look nice :-)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •