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Thread: Design worthy of consideration?

  1. #1
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    Default Design worthy of consideration?

    Many of you may have seen this before, but I just noticed it yesterday. While thinking through the conversion of my hull for sail, I noticed this idea for a removeable rig that allows for adjustable thole pins for rowing:

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....manning/m3.gif

    I would like the option to row the canoe if at all possible, without a rig that sticks out. The beam of my hull is 36", and this addition may make it 38" or so, is this wide enough to row? It looks like it offers a lot of flexibility in placement of the leeboard also. I intend to install a rudder for steering though, and I am not interested in the tripod mast prefering a more substantial sailplan. If the ability to row is not gained using this, I will likely use a more current leeboard thwart. The reason I like this idea is the fact that my aluminum gunwales are sloped on the inboard side, while the outboard profile creates the more intuitive clamping profile:





    Here is a link to the entire article regarding this removeable thwart:

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....g/manning.html

  2. #2
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    This looks an incredibly complicated way of solving a non problem. Leeboard thwart with a bracket is simple and strong, as is a mast foot and thwart.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveS View Post
    This looks an incredibly complicated way of solving a non problem. Leeboard thwart with a bracket is simple and strong, as is a mast foot and thwart.
    Point taken... how about the ability to row?

  4. #4
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    I met Graham D from the OCSG at the weekend. He has a (very!!!) converted Coleman that he rows rather than paddling. He just has rowlocks fitted on the gunwales and an adjustable sliding seat and he says it rows very well.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    I met Graham D from the OCSG at the weekend. He has a (very!!!) converted Coleman that he rows rather than paddling. He just has rowlocks fitted on the gunwales and an adjustable sliding seat and he says it rows very well.
    Any idea what the beam oh his coleman? Most of what I've dug up so far recommends about 48" between oarlocks. (never rowed a boat before). I read about two setups today using a folding gate hinge on a reinforced gunnel so it drops out of the way when not in use

    and a plywood outrigger temporarily clamped on...



    This second option looks better in my eyes and might be able to be added without modification. Anyone have other options (on the cheap) to add rowlocks without altering the canoe terribly?

  6. #6
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    I don't have pictures but had a very simple frame I clamped to the gunwales with coduit clamps. The two aluminum poles had a fabric and foam seat sewn between them. Then the ends of the poles had a channel with the oar locks clamped on with U bolts. It was a great deal of fun in the surf when rowed backwards facing the beach.
    Dr. Joe
    Electric Hospital
    Coos Bay Or
    http://electrichospital.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Joe View Post
    I don't have pictures but had a very simple frame I clamped to the gunwales with coduit clamps. The two aluminum poles had a fabric and foam seat sewn between them. Then the ends of the poles had a channel with the oar locks clamped on with U bolts. It was a great deal of fun in the surf when rowed backwards facing the beach.
    Grumman makes a row rig similar to what you describe, and although it is reasonable at $295 it is out of my current budget. If you were out for a row, it makes sense but did you ever sail your canoe with your rowing frame in place? I'd like to be able to pick up an oar while on the water sailing when the wind dies...

  8. #8
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    These look interesting and at a reasonable price point if they work well...



    Do they look like they would work well? http://www.campmor.com/wenonah-clamp...4&ci_sku=75485

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvacgar View Post
    Grumman makes a row rig similar to what you describe, and although it is reasonable at $295 it is out of my current budget. If you were out for a row, it makes sense but did you ever sail your canoe with your rowing frame in place? I'd like to be able to pick up an oar while on the water sailing when the wind dies...

    I never have sailed a canoe but hope to try it soon. I think I built mine for the cost of a pair of oar locks. The rest was all scrap metal. The oars were a gift.

    When I surfed it facing the beach the oars trailed in the water way behind the seat. This allowed great control. I think this would be possible to double as both a rudder and lee boards. This may be a radical thought but windsurfers control the direction of tack by changing the relationship of the pull on the sail and the resistance of the skeg. If that is possible and you used twin rudders/oars that could be moved to adjust the resistance point would it be possible to change the angle of tack while rowing?
    Dr. Joe
    Electric Hospital
    Coos Bay Or
    http://electrichospital.com

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