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Thread: A good example of getting along

  1. #1

    Default A good example of getting along

    Aside from the legal aspects of access to rivers, there is the simple matter of canoeist, fisherman and land owners treating each other with respect. The best example of this that I am aware of takes place on the Au Sable River in Michigan, USA. This river is world famous to both flyfisher people and canoeists and there seems to be a mutual respect for both activities. In fact, the local fly fishing shop in Grayling is both a sponsor and the starting point for the the annual canoe marathon.

    Whilst I can't provide comment on the legalities for land and river access/ownership for the Au Sable, I think it is a very good example for how a river busy with both canoeist and fisherman can co-exist.

    Perhaps looking at good examples of mutual respect in various parts of the world can help in the UK. Whilst the UK may have different laws relating to river access/ownership, it seems to me that fundamental reason why some land owners and fisherman are so protective of what they claim as theirs is because they can't seem to see how both activities can co-exist.

  2. #2

    Default

    I understand that in the USA, the default position is that rivers can be canoed upon, whereas in the UK, the default position is that they cannot.

    When this was decided in the USA in the early nineteenth century, it was based on the Magna Carta, because of the British basis for US law. The Magna Carta is part of the basis for Rev Caffyn's argument that we already have the right to paddle on English rivers.

    I agree that anglers, canoeists and land owners should co-operate. Land owners and anglers have no incentive do so, because their understanding of the law makes us trespassers, although many do.
    Doug Dew
    "The best is yet to come" My Father


  3. #3
    Join Date
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    The Ballinderry River in County Tyone N Ireland has a scheme going to promote the river for fishing, canoing, conservation and tourism. It is setting an example of how all the communities can work together for a better future for the river. I was even approached to write an article for their local newsletter

    It would be great if more river management teams could take a leaf out of their book.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  4. #4

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    Al
    what is the situation in Northern Ireland. Do land owners stop you paddling?
    Doug Dew
    "The best is yet to come" My Father


  5. #5
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    Doug in my experience of paddling in NI there is little conflict between landowners and paddlers.

    Bushcraft Survival and First Aid Training.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougdew99 View Post
    Al
    what is the situation in Northern Ireland. Do land owners stop you paddling?
    Quote Originally Posted by wayne View Post
    Doug in my experience of paddling in NI there is little conflict between landowners and paddlers.
    Wayne is correct, we are blessed with good relations with the land owners. Its the anglers who put up most opposition, although to be fair, the majority that I have come across have been fine.
    We have a strange tradition here where there is "No Sunday Fishing" on a lot of rivers, so we can slip in the odd river run during the fishing season if it has rained and the rivers are up. But we have an unwritten rule where we run the rivers freely during the winter months as the fishermen are not about, but try to avoid heavily fished rivers between April and October.

    I've even had the odd request from a fisherman on the Strule, (a famous Salmon river out west) where he asked me to paddle over behind a certain rock to see if I could "wake up" some fish he suspected to be "sleeping" there.

    But I was also accused of ruining a mans evening fishing because I'd poled upstream of where he was fishing, just before he arrived. He said he wondered why nothing was happening, and then realised it was because I'd been through and scared all the fish away.

    We are lucky that on many rivers, we have canoe access steps built on the banks for us. On at least one we have changing rooms too, which I must admit I have never used.

    I was asked not to paddle a river once by the local "arse and crockery" (aristocracy) but it was more because she was worried about liability issues, should someone get hurt on the weir in her back garden.

    It is a bit different on the other side of the border, but I will leave that to someone more local to describe it to you.

    I hope that some day England and Wales can have the same access as us and Scotland, and I follow the work you have been doing lately with interest.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  7. #7
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    A lot of the rivers banks are public reserve here in Oz and most farmers are pretty obliging. But I've noticed a couple of popular put-ins in Southern Tasmania have been fenced off recently. I'd like to give the landowners the benefit of the doubt and say they're getting worried about public liability. But the fact that an increasing number of other landowners are formalising public river access with tracks, stiles, and signage of late indicates that they're just being .
    Last edited by sohojacques; 21st-March-2011 at 05:12 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Cleveland, UK
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    Then of course there is the other side of the coin, I pulled this off a Fishing Forum.



    Went out for a couple of hours over lunch time. The river was 9" ASL, and crystal clear. I never saw a thing move, but it was nice to be out again.
    Regards Lunesman.
    PS This gladdened my heart, at least there is one less canoe on the river
    This image is reduced by 13%, click it to view full size.

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