Results 1 to 38 of 38

Thread: Alternative side airbags?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default Alternative side airbags?

    When I was in the local chandlers the other day I noticed a big pile of deflated fenders and it suddenly struck me that they might make good alternatives to side airbags. There'd be no financial advantage as they cost about the same but they'd be much stronger than airbags (you could sit on them and use them for hiking out), they have super strong eyelet attachment points on either end but would probably still need fastening down in the middle. The downside would be that they'd be heavier than conventional side airbags. I was even wondering if they couldn't be used as floats for a basic outrigger set up? Thoughts anyone? Good idea or am I overlooking something obvious?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    As I see it, you're only overlooking something significant if hull weight matters to you.

    I generally paddle a light-ish weight composite canoe that still comes in at way more than the 25lbs of the latest edition... and have just been trying to get my kit down to manageable proportions (and ordering thing like titanium bowls and cutlery to save 50g-100g here and there).

    The idea of using a heavy fender where a lightweight airbag would do strikes me as a complete non-starter.... but if you don't care about laden weight then why not

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Yeah they would weigh significantly more than airbags. I just wondered if the added durability (particularly being strong enough to sit on) would be a worthwhile trade off. I had intended getting a pair of side airbags from Solway Dory (I probably still will do tbh) but I'll wait and see how I get on sailing the canoe in light winds (and try a few capsize drills) before I decide.

  4. #4
    Crow's Avatar
    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    16,117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GregandGinaS View Post

    I generally paddle a light-ish weight composite canoe that still comes in at way more than the 25lbs of the latest edition... and have just been trying to get my kit down to manageable proportions (and ordering thing like titanium bowls and cutlery to save 50g-100g here and there).

    Gosh. I'm sure that's news to most people here!

    But you boy racers have different priorities to us gourmandising slow food trippers, I suppose...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    Yeah they would weigh significantly more than airbags. I just wondered if the added durability (particularly being strong enough to sit on) would be a worthwhile trade off. I had intended getting a pair of side airbags from Solway Dory (I probably still will do tbh) but I'll wait and see how I get on sailing the canoe in light winds (and try a few capsize drills) before I decide.
    I kind of like the idea of hanging fenders off your canoe. Obviously not for the extreme performance every ounce counts lean mean racer types (Greg!) but handy for bouncing off rocks etc, and as you say some kind of outrigger / stabiliser function?

    PS The tune "Alternative Ulster" By Stiff Little Fingers, with the lyrics slightly altered is now going through my head - and it's all your fault!

    Here comes the future and you can't run from it
    If you've got a blacklist I want to be on it


    Crow Trip Log

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    The thing is I've just bought a Solway Dory Expedition rig not a high performance Bermudan rig because of my intended use. When I go on an "expedition" (few days camping) I take loads of kit with me and I do wonder how effective side airbags would be in trying to recover a capsized fully laden expedition boat. I suspect that although they would help, the advantage of having them would be less than in an empty or lightly laden boat. With that in mind maybe the extra durability of using fenders (which are by their very nature very tough) might be more valuable than the potential weight saving of using normal airbags. I'm pretty sure in a "backs to the wall" situation in the middle of nowhere it would be relatively easy to improvise some kind of outrigger arrangement using a pair of fenders but normally I'd envisage just using them in place of side airbags in the canoe. I'm just thinking out loud here really.

    PS Alternative Ulster ain't such a bad song to have going around your head imho! (I used to quite like SLF back in the day ).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    "An Alternative airbag
    Grab it change it's yours
    Get an Alternative airbag
    Ignore the bores, their laws
    Get an Alternative airbag
    Be an anti-security force
    Alter your native airbag
    Alter your native land"

  7. #7
    Crow's Avatar
    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    16,117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    PS Alternative Ulster ain't such a bad song to have going around your head imho! (I used to quite like SLF back in the day ).
    Well I think they should re-release it as "Alternative Airbags" for Red Nose Day or something.

    "Alternative Airbags!
    Grab it change it's yours
    Get an Alternative Airbag
    Ignore the bores, their laws
    Get an Alternative Airbag
    Be an anti-security force
    Alter your native Airbags
    Alter your native canoe..."
    etc.

    Here comes the future and you can't run from it
    If you've got a blacklist I want to be on it


    Crow Trip Log

  8. #8
    Crow's Avatar
    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    16,117

    Default



    Snap!

    Uncanny!



    Here comes the future and you can't run from it
    If you've got a blacklist I want to be on it


    Crow Trip Log

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Great minds think alike it seems (dunno how you'd explain us two though lol!)

  10. #10
    Crow's Avatar
    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    16,117

    Default




    In case anyone wonders what we're on about:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVjNPNNxySc

    Here comes the future and you can't run from it
    If you've got a blacklist I want to be on it


    Crow Trip Log

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    1,103

    Default

    That was a little frightening boys.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,205

    Default Fenders

    At the risk of getting back to the original issue...

    For use as sidebags the weight is the big thing with fenders, but they are tough. Tough enough to sit on but I can't see why I would want to sit on them - I'm either kneeling, often off to the side, partly perched on the edge of an extra wide webbing seat, or sitting up on the gunwhale. See the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nB_Bz...layer_embedded eg 1.50>2.06 + 3.40>end

    I vaguely remember seeing an outrigger setup using a pair of fenders - they could be roughly the right shape and size if chosen wisely. How you attach them neatly to a beam would be a challenge, though. Lashed with roof rack straps might work? You wouldn't want them coming off at a critical moment though...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windorpaddle View Post
    At the risk of getting back to the original issue...

    For use as sidebags the weight is the big thing with fenders, but they are tough. Tough enough to sit on but I can't see why I would want to sit on them - I'm either kneeling, often off to the side, partly perched on the edge of an extra wide webbing seat, or sitting up on the gunwhale. See the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nB_Bz...layer_embedded eg 1.50>2.06 + 3.40>end

    I vaguely remember seeing an outrigger setup using a pair of fenders - they could be roughly the right shape and size if chosen wisely. How you attach them neatly to a beam would be a challenge, though. Lashed with roof rack straps might work? You wouldn't want them coming off at a critical moment though...
    I was thinking more along the lines of being able to use them as emergency outrigger floats Keith not as a full time solution. Interesting what you say about not needing to sit on them, as I've not actually sailed my canoe yet I'll bow to your superior knowledge (I was just thinking back to my dinghy sailing days when I used to spend a lot of time sitting on the gunwales, hanging over the side of the boat).
    I'm pretty sure I'm going to buy the Holt airbags from SD anyway but I have to go back to the chandlers again this morning so I may have another look at the fenders. I'm going to go and do some practice capsizes later today or tomorrow to see how I cope with the end airbags only (I know I can get back in okay already but I end up having to do a lot of bailing before I'm ready to go again)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,205

    Default

    Chris
    Not sure about superior knowledge - just my experience! I've sailed a fair few dinghies, too.

    I'm going to go and do some practice capsizes later today or tomorrow to see how I cope with the end airbags only (I know I can get back in okay already but I end up having to do a lot of bailing before I'm ready to go again)
    Good luck with the practice. Again in my experience, it's not just that you will have to do a lot of bailing but that in conditions that would have caused you to capsize in the first place you might not have enough freeboard to bail it out at all, especially if you are back in the boat. Depends on size of canoe and size of bags and how well they are held in. A compromise is to right the boat and bail some out while is lightly loaded, then get back in to finish bailing the rest. May be a higher risk strategy as you are in the water longer and risk shipping more water as you get back in - depends how agile you are and how good at re-entry!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    On the Forth
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Last season I used two dinghy floatation bags, but only because SD were having trouble sourcing their bags, luckily they have them back in stock so I ordered their bigger bags with my bermudan rig (which came on wednesday ), your welcome to try the yellow ones, pm me, maybe we can sort out a day out on Lomond or Long. Not this coming week tho, its the big trip to Kintyre.

    On capsizing a fully laded boat, I think I'm in the camp of having everything roped together, that way in the event of a capsize, they will be still attached to the boat, but wont weight the boat down. I think the other camp is to lash everything in, so theres less water to bail out, shrug, suck it and see I guess.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windorpaddle View Post
    Chris
    Not sure about superior knowledge - just my experience! I've sailed a fair few dinghies, too.


    Good luck with the practice. Again in my experience, it's not just that you will have to do a lot of bailing but that in conditions that would have caused you to capsize in the first place you might not have enough freeboard to bail it out at all, especially if you are back in the boat. Depends on size of canoe and size of bags and how well they are held in. A compromise is to right the boat and bail some out while is lightly loaded, then get back in to finish bailing the rest. May be a higher risk strategy as you are in the water longer and risk shipping more water as you get back in - depends how agile you are and how good at re-entry!
    Yeah, that's a very good point. One of the first things I did when I got my canoe was to try practicing re-entry and I found it reasonably straightforward tbh. It was done in calm conditions though and as you say it would probably be a different proposition in choppy conditions. I always carry a paddle float (that I bought initially for kayaking) and I can improvise a temporary outrigger using that and a paddle to assist re-entry and aid stability while the boat is swamped or in more extreme conditions.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    I'm not at all convinced that fenders are necessary to being comfortable on the gunwales... but you might want to consider toe straps: I've not bothered yet... just hooking my toes / heels under thwarts / seats / etc. - but I used toestraps in Dave's boat last spring and will install some in my Jensen in due course.

    Emergency outrigger options: we've got a paddle float I've yet to test in any worthwhile conditions, but which has the advantage of weighing next to nothing and taking up very little space.



    We also carry a True North Zero-1 Backpack that Kim Bull and others tested extensively and reported positively on at a self-recovery session on Kielder last year. Kim reported that the bag proved "bouyant enough to allow the options of using it to help right a capsized boat with only minimum water remaining in, then acting as an outrigger float on a canoe pole to provide a bombproof self rescue aid"



    What we've yet to finalise are the arrangements for actually using either the paddle float OR the pack in anger in the sort of conditions where that might matter: forgot about trying different approaches when mucking about and repeatedly swamping the Jensen on Barton Broad the other week - something else for the spring to-do list!

    Anyway, to that combination we've just added a home made bailer of epic proportions: found one of these (seemingly brand new) for 2 at a boat jumble... and then chopped the front off...



    That DID come from my experience on Barton Broad: an 18' tandem holds an awful lot of water

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,205

    Default

    I always carry a paddle float (that I bought initially for kayaking) and I can improvise a temporary outrigger using that and a paddle to assist re-entry and aid stability while the boat is swamped or in more extreme conditions.
    Yes, a paddle float is a good idea. Again I have one from when I used to do some seakayaking (paddled my Nordkapp from Scotland to Ireland once...)
    I tried the float with the canoe but do not favour it personally - it wasn't big enough to give a huge amount of support during the re-entry and the paddle bent a lot! But I am a big lump and getting less agile with advancing years...

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gailainne View Post
    I think I'm in the camp of having everything roped together, that way in the event of a capsize, they will be still attached to the boat, but wont weight the boat down. I think the other camp is to lash everything in, so theres less water to bail out, shrug, suck it and see I guess.
    I've come around to thinking you need to do both...

    Lashing in a load of high volume kit in the bows (in place of a large bow airbag) really helps with emptying IF you can lift the stern a little: kinda like having a second pair of hands holding the boat up at the other end.

    Of course... lifting the stern with kit in is near enough impossible... so I'm now lashing down in a way that's easily released onto a leash. the bag that goes on the leash is the TrueNorth Zero 1 pack... which is the one I need to experiment with using as a sponson to roll the canoe over (providing buoyancy UNDER the lower gunwale) and then to stabilise the canoe during bailing.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windorpaddle View Post
    Yes, a paddle float is a good idea. Again I have one from when I used to do some seakayaking (paddled my Nordkapp from Scotland to Ireland once...)
    I tried the float with the canoe but do not favour it personally - it wasn't big enough to give a huge amount of support during the re-entry and the paddle bent a lot! But I am a big lump and getting less agile with advancing years...
    Keith, I'm surprised at that, I found it quite effective as long as the paddle was fastened to a thwart to stop it twisting sideways. Re-entering my boat was relatively easy (even without the paddle float) but my friend who paddles an OT Pack found he was unable to get back in his boat at all without the assistance of the paddle float outrigger. I should add that we were using a kayak paddle as an outrigger not a canoe paddle (I carry the kayak paddle with me as a spare anyway). I think it's good to experiment with rescues and it's interesting to hear of other folks experiences and ideas (especially when they have far more experience than yourself as is the case here).

    Greg, the fender thing was just an idea I had and wondered if anyone else had tried it or thought about it. I'm more than happy to go with conventional wisdom and order the side airbags from SD (it's what I originally intended anyway). There's no point in trying to reinvent the wheel!

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,205

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurassic View Post
    Keith, I'm surprised at that, I found it quite effective as long as the paddle was fastened to a thwart to stop it twisting sideways. Re-entering my boat was relatively easy (even without the paddle float) but my friend who paddles an OT Pack found he was unable to get back in his boat at all without the assistance of the paddle float outrigger. I should add that we were using a kayak paddle as an outrigger not a canoe paddle (I carry the kayak paddle with me as a spare anyway). I think it's good to experiment with rescues and it's interesting to hear of other folks experiences and ideas (especially when they have far more experience than yourself as is the case here).
    It was a kayak paddle - was a long time ago though so perhaps I should it try again. When in exposed waters I tend to use my mini-outriggers so all this is not applicable, but there are times on larger lakes on decent days when I don't use them so this would be a useful extra line of defence.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    I had another look at the fenders today when I was in the chandlers again but I've just done an order form for the SD airbags instead.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    461

    Default

    Ok , I suffered with a lot of punctures using side bags in my Grumman , so i made some poly tarp covers for them:


    polytarp measured out


    Stitched in some fashion


    The finished article


    Air valve detail ( brass grommet)



    installed in my Curlew, (rather then the Grumman in this shot) but ne'er a puncture agin




    I don't claim to be 'nobody's hero' but hope you will agree with me that it is not a 'suspect device' but we will have to 'wait and see' of course, however I doubt it would survive 'barb-wire love'.

    Hanx.

    UT

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by unk tantor View Post

    i don't claim to be 'nobody's hero' but hope you will agree with me that it is not a 'suspect device' but we will have to 'wait and see' of course, however i doubt it would survive 'barb-wire love'.

    Hanx.

    Ut
    lol.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    632

    Default



    As you can see I did away with airbags altogether and opted for built in wardrobes. Also my outriggers are big enough to almost support me on their own. Therefore after a practice capsize I was able to easily climb back into what was almost a dry boat.

    Only trouble is it almost needs a removal lorry to do any kind of portage.

    Steve

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    South Coast
    Posts
    328

    Default

    Just ordered 2 inflatable boar rollers @ 19.95 each, for use when hauling laden sailing canoe up some shingly or rocky beach on my own. See http://www.force4.co.uk/1847/Force-4...-160x25cm.html . Might also be useful as side buoyancy bags?

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
    Just ordered 2 inflatable boar rollers @ 19.95 each, for use when hauling laden sailing canoe up some shingly or rocky beach on my own. See http://www.force4.co.uk/1847/Force-4...-160x25cm.html . Might also be useful as side buoyancy bags?
    Now they look interesting ! Have you actually seen them ? Would they work as emergency outriggers too ?

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Poole Dorset UK
    Posts
    2,282

    Default

    ....I was even wondering if they couldn't be used as floats for a basic outrigger set up? Thoughts anyone? Good idea or am I overlooking something obvious?



    I slipped and fell hard enough to snap my gunnel, but not enough to push the fender under.



















    This fender outrigger - the first outrigger I had ever used was enough for me to know I wanted to build a proper one.

    It worked, even if it was the wrong height to keep the boat level, and the arms and fender were only tied on with 3 mm paracord and was all very wobbly.

    Even Stupid the dog, was happy - well...that was until it rained on him and he wanted to go hammocking instead.


  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    I've actually looked at those rollers a few times and wondered if they'd be good for use with a glassfibre hull on occasions when you couldn't be bothered to use a trolley (or the stones on the beach were too rough for a trolley). I've actually got a homemade version (which is a bit smaller) made out of rolled up minicell inside a tough synthetic sand bag. I've not got around to trying it yet but I think it should work to some degree and will also make a decent seat around camp as well.
    As far as using the rollers as outriggers is concerned I can see a couple of potential problems. The first would be how to attach the roller to an outrigger spar (or spars) effectively and the second would be that when it hit the water it would cause far more drag than a proper outrigger and probably affect sailing performance. One of the joys of the SD type outriggers is that they're so unobtrusive in use (if not in appearance). I'm sure it'd be possible to improvise an outrigger system for emergency use though.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    grange over sands, cumbria
    Posts
    931

    Default

    For many expeditions i took a large, long fender for pulling the canoe onto when landing on a stony beach. It worked quite well but sometimes slipped off to the side when a rock stopped it from rolling.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    South Coast
    Posts
    328

    Default

    They're due to arrive in a couple of days. I only intend to use them as rollers but if anyone else wants to experiment I could bring them to Rutland.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
    They're due to arrive in a couple of days. I only intend to use them as rollers but if anyone else wants to experiment I could bring them to Rutland.
    I struggle, on my own, with getting my laden boat far enough up the beach to get it onto my trolley without dragging the stern over the gravel, rocks etc. Do you think a roller would help solve the problem ? How would I get it under the stern of the boat - I can't push the trolley under it when it's floating. My only solution so far is to unload and completely de-rig - and I'd often far rather get it out of the water and up the beach first !

    Do you intend travelling with the rollers inflated or deflated ( and do you need a footpump to inflate them) ?

    Could a roller be strapped in to replace side bouyancy bags, for expedition purposes?

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south Cumbria
    Posts
    1,205

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
    They're due to arrive in a couple of days. I only intend to use them as rollers but if anyone else wants to experiment I could bring them to Rutland.
    I'd be really interested to see them so please bring them. Like Dave S I've tried a fender or two but they are too short and the boat falls off the side too easily. And they are a bit heavy and bulky if that is all you are going to use them for. If these rollers could be used for buoyancy as well it could be good.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    South Coast
    Posts
    328

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ISABELLA View Post
    I struggle, on my own, with getting my laden boat far enough up the beach to get it onto my trolley without dragging the stern over the gravel, rocks etc. Do you think a roller would help solve the problem ? How would I get it under the stern of the boat - I can't push the trolley under it when it's floating. My only solution so far is to unload and completely de-rig - and I'd often far rather get it out of the water and up the beach first ! Do you intend travelling with the rollers inflated or deflated ( and do you need a footpump to inflate them) ? Could a roller be strapped in to replace side bouyancy bags, for expedition purposes?
    I'm planning a solo expedition and hoping that boat rollers will help me get my sailing canoe up soft sand, deep shingle or possibly rocky beaches unaided. However, I'm hoping to use a small trolley, strapped under the boat before landing, most of the time. Alternatively, I may anchor and sleep on board. I imagine the rollers might well be usable as buoyancy bags but we'll have a look at Rutland and report back. I suppose I'll need to take a pump for inflation and will try to find something small and lightweight.

    Why can't you strap your trolley under your boat while afloat? It would save a lot of faff if you could do this.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Have tried - but haven't managed to work out a way of pushing the wheels down under the boat! Perhaps I need smaller wheels with less inherent bouyancy !?

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    South Coast
    Posts
    328

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ISABELLA View Post
    Have tried - but haven't managed to work out a way of pushing the wheels down under the boat! Perhaps I need smaller wheels with less inherent bouyancy !?
    For expeditions and day-sails I use a small Soway Dory trolley with wheels which are 260 mm x 85, I think. It pushes sideways under the boat with no difficulty and the buoyancy of the wheels keeps it nicely in position against the underside of the boat while I do up the strap. I have cable ties on the strap which line up with the edge of the side tanks - so I can centre the trolley easily.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
    For expeditions and day-sails I use a small Soway Dory trolley with wheels which are 260 mm x 85, I think. It pushes sideways under the boat with no difficulty and the buoyancy of the wheels keeps it nicely in position against the underside of the boat while I do up the strap. I have cable ties on the strap which line up with the edge of the side tanks - so I can centre the trolley easily.
    Have just bought a smaller, lighter trolley (bit of a gamble - it was very cheap ..... but seems OK) which has 260 mm diameter wheels. So - goody goody -sounds as if it might solve my problem. Will have to don dry suit and try it ! Thanks for that !

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh, Scotland.
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    I have a cheapo Lomo trolley that I use, it's a bit narrow as it's designed for kayaks not canoes but it does the job. I'm able to push it under the canoe while it's still afloat in a similar fashion to what Peregrine describes and as he says the buoyancy of the tyres holds it under the boat while I attach it using tie straps. The only problem is ensuring that it's fairly straight otherwise my canoe emerges from the water in a crab like fashion!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •