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Thread: Fishing

  1. #1
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    Default Fishing

    There has been some mention of fishing from your canoe. so how many of you do and how do you fish? Handline, rod and line maybe even a net.

    I have tried using Streamline a couple of times and it is fun to use but I have not had either a fishing trip in my canoe or a long trip where I have spent time fishing.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    There has been some mention of fishing from your canoe. so how many of you do and how do you fish? Handline, rod and line maybe even a net.
    Just towed a Rapala round Windermere to little effect so far. Working on a deep rig for char.

    Fly rod from canoe pending start of trout season (March).

    Oh, and I have some crayfish pots (as yet unsullied).

    Handlines are illegal in freshwater donchaknow (but I'm not telling)

    Jim.

  3. #3
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    Re handlines being ilegal.
    Gosh, didn't know that, is that a blanket ban? canals, rivers lakes etc. Is it UK wide? Not really done much fish mugging but was anticipating looking at it as a concept.

  4. #4
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    Handlines are illegal in freshwater
    To me this seems a bit arbitrary. But the fishing community are famous for being arbitrary. It is probaly caused by fishing licences being named "rod licences". I wonder if a minimum rod length is specified? Is a 20cm rod still a rod?
    Rogue

  5. #5
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    Hand lines are legal for Sea fishing but in England definitely illegal on inland waters. In Scotland it is a little more vague (no rod licenses here) but that said it is still probably illegal.

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    i'm fairly certain handlines from a boat are illegal, but I was still planning on giving it a go . Is that wrong?
    'There is no wealth but life itself.'

  7. #7
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    Hi all, my first post here,

    Does it strike anyone else as strange that hand lines are illegal? Its how things used to be done.
    Same with hunting, if you have hundreds of pounds for a shot gun you can hunt rabbits, but you cant use a bow and arrow.

    Ive just done some research on fishing licences cos i thought I would do some fishing while out on the lakes this summer. I dont begrudge the money , it goes on restocking , conservation etc. but why does it have to be so complicated.

    I have to get 2 licences for where I paddle ( Lough Erne ) from 2 different govt departments . End result : I decided not to bother

  8. #8

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    Oh Dear

    things are complicated. In freshwater and inland tidal waters of England & Wales hand lines are illegal by default. They are not expressly forbidden but as "rod & line" is the only method that can be simply licenced anything else is illegal unless permission is obtained from the Environment Agency. You could get round this by using a very short rod. In addition to this you must have control of the rod at all times. If you don't it then classed as aset line so is definitely illegal. It is no good fixing it in the back of the canoe and keeping paddling until you hook a fish. You should have some form of bite indicator to show when a fish had taken a bait. If you did this you would need, as a minimum, to have a rod licence and in most cases would need to have permission from the land/fishing rights owner. If you didn't it would be theft. You also need to be aware of any local close seasons for different areas and different species. Details of these are on the Environment Agency website. The law in Scotland is different again and so can't really comment. Have spotted that its an offence to fish in lochs without the owner's permission. All I can say is that if you do it and get caught it's your own fault! Don't do it near me or you will get caught!

    Hope that helps (or not)
    "All right" said Eeyore "We're going. Only don't blame me"

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    In a recent thread on UKRG. someone said there are 4million fisherpersons in England but the EA only actually sell one million licences.

    So most people fish without a licience anyway?
    Rogue

  10. #10

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    probably about right if you believe the polls. Also need to take into account sea anglers who don't need a licence, kids under 12 don't either and as we don't prosecute under 16s they yend to get away with it as well. Still a bit hard to square the figures though.

    Chris
    "All right" said Eeyore "We're going. Only don't blame me"

    www.canoepaddler.me.uk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silvergirl
    i'm fairly certain handlines from a boat are illegal, but I was still planning on giving it a go . Is that wrong?
    Just wanted to point out I was joking on this point but it dosen't work in text. ( I used to be the one checking permits and wouldn't fish illegally.)

    I do have a rod but have never actually fished in this country. Would like to give it a go sometime though.
    'There is no wealth but life itself.'

  12. #12

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    have only ever fished for mackerel in my canoe with a handline and feathers - a fe tips for anyone who doesnt know

    mackerel fishing only works in the summer months (when they migrate in-shore to feed), and the best time seems to be warm evenings with little wind (good news for canoeists) around headlands or rocks where there is a reasonable current flowing. Mackerel are mid to shallow water feeders and shoal, if you get one you'll likely get enough to to feed your family, but you may not hit for a while. They are a slow growing species so only take as many as you need. Eat them quick too - fresh they are excellent but they deteriorate quickly.

    watch the birdies - if they're diving thats a good sign and head over

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    There has been some mention of fishing from your canoe. so how many of you do and how do you fish? Handline, rod and line maybe even a net.

    I have tried using Streamline a couple of times and it is fun to use but I have not had either a fishing trip in my canoe or a long trip where I have spent time fishing.
    All of the above (handlines are legal here). Usually in the spring we go for a big static trout fishing trip where we have a base camp and fish different areas or different lakes each day. Last year I went in a day late and was informed by my friends I couldn fish - I just had to eat (they'd caught too many fish). Most other trips I use a hand line and just troll while we are making time. My favorite fish are walleye, bass (which taste very good in our north waters - terrible in the south), northern, trout, salmon, blue gills, whitefish, etc. In the fall we net whitefish with a 100 foot net.

    I also spear northerns in the winter and suckers in the spring, but that has nothing to do with canoes.

    Not sure about what you mean by "streamline." It is a brand of fish line here. I usually use "Spider Wire" instead (much stronger).

    PG
    Last edited by pierre girard; 27th-January-2006 at 03:23 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard
    Not sure about what you mean by "streamline." It is a brand of fish line here. I usually use "Spider Wire" instead (much stronger).

    PG
    http://www.streamlines.com/

    A variant on the handline that allows you to cast. It is remarkable effective and I can cast quite some distance with one.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by neiltoo

    I have to get 2 licences for where I paddle ( Lough Erne ) from 2 different govt departments . End result : I decided not to bother
    Perhaps I should clarify : I decided not to fish, as opposed to deciding not to get the licences
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    http://www.streamlines.com/

    A variant on the handline that allows you to cast. It is remarkable effective and I can cast quite some distance with one.
    Yes, after looking at the site - I have heard of this. Been thinking of getting one. Be very nice for canoe trips. Rods have a tendency to be a pain on portages.

    PG

  17. #17

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    The Hardy Smuggler rods break down into one foot lengths, so will fit in any pack. They look great, cast well, but are horrifyingly expensive.

    I have a Shakespeare 'Expedition' fly rod - 10 foot, but breaks down into four pieces. Fits on my rucksack.

    My spinning/bait rod is two piece so less suitable for camping.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc
    My spinning/bait rod is two piece so less suitable for camping.
    You've got a 15 foot canoe, how small does your rod need to get It only needs to go in your rucksack if you are portaging

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc
    The Hardy Smuggler rods break down into one foot lengths, so will fit in any pack. They look great, cast well, but are horrifyingly expensive.

    I have a Shakespeare 'Expedition' fly rod - 10 foot, but breaks down into four pieces. Fits on my rucksack.

    My spinning/bait rod is two piece so less suitable for camping.
    I've made up some pieces of looped elastic cord with a toggle. Work well for things like lashing rods, paddles, or anything of length, to the thwarts and gunwales. Very quick and easy.

    PG

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