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Thread: Swans,Spas,South African Rusks & a Shag

  1. #1
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    Default Swans,Spas,South African Rusks & a Shag

    After a month of nasty work , mtr vehicle accidents and three horrible fatalities, I had been really looking forward to my leave.
    I'd planned a nice couple of nights away , had baked a big batch of Buttermilk Rusks ( not the kids teething variety ) and some of Zealots Energy cookies to take.


    Well the weather has been rubbish for most of my leave, Rain, rain and more rain. houses and cars flooded in town.

    So yesterday I thought I better get out, before I go back to work or I'll go Mad .
    So set off for a paddle for the day on Lake Rotoiti.


    Some of the beautiful scenery around the Lake





    The weather was supposed to settle in with a bit of rain and some wind



    But I had a Plan.....
    First I stopped for a cuppa Rooibos Tea ( Red bush ) and a Rusk or two


    I changed into my oilskins for the approaching rain and noticed a Shag hiding out of the wind.
    I got into the canoe to see how close he'd let me get.



    About 4 meters , pity the photo is a bit average
    They are otherwise known as a Cormorant but called a Shag usually.

    and saw these Black Swans later on


    I then went looking for some cliffs, Paritangi , means the cliffs of wailing
    When a new War canoe was almost finished it was dragged up to the top of these cliffs for quality testing. The canoe was propelled out over the edge so it dropped from a great height into the water.
    If it survived , it was then finished and put to use for it would stand any storm the Lake could throw at it ( which can get pretty wild).
    The builders would all stand watching, and after all the work put in to building they would wail in anticipation as they watched the canoe fall, hence the name.


    I was not tempted to test my 3.6 mm ply canoe by pushing it over the edge




    my self portrait ,the cliffs behind me , My' leave ' beard which only gets grown when I'm on holiday, as my wife points out is more grey each time.

    my destination across the lake , just as the weather started to get a bit wet


    Manupura Hot Spas







    I sat and turned into a prune watching the rain pass over the lake

    Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh


    Had another cuppa, an energy cookie and a rusk.
    The Lady custodian of the pools came down to see my canoe, and said " Ka Pai, Waka"
    which made my day
    then I started heading back



    Starting to get dark , a nice time of day

    paddled past Pateko Island, once used as a forward observation post during inter tribal wars. now a sacred site where ancestors of a famous Chief are buried.



    about a 23 km round trip


    The sunset behind me

    and finally back in the dark


    A nice paddle , a soak and battery recharge.
    Ready to go back to work on Sunday,
    Though there are three days of fine weather coming up next week , hmmmmm
    Last edited by Tomo-hawk; 10th-June-2010 at 10:13 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
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    What a great blogg and a hot bath too! The give away for me was the tree fern although your country exports them to anyplace that will buy them.

    The black swans, they are mostly white up here.

    And the Shag:-
    The common cormorant or shag
    Lays eggs inside a paper bag
    The reason you will see no doubt
    It is to keep the lightning out
    But what these unobservant birds
    Have never noticed is that herds
    Of wandering bears may come with buns
    And steal the bags to hold the crumbs.

    "Ka Pai, Waka", I presume that it means something good? From the photos it looks like a well made canoe, is it your own work? You should be proud of it.

    Let's hope that your work is not so traumatic in the future.

    May you canoeing always bring you peace.

    Doug.
    Last edited by dougoutcanoe; 10th-June-2010 at 10:45 PM. Reason: to add nonsense, grammar
    When there's trouble on shore, there's peace on the wave,
    Afloat in the White Canoe.
    Alan Sullivan


  3. #3
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    Thanks Doug,

    Ka Pai , means " very good" or "well done".

    So I thought i'd post our Rusk recipe and call them

    Ka Pai Buttermilk Rusks

    as I reckon they are very good and definitly well done, being double baked.
    I first had them in South Africa about 16 years ago, apparently they were baked by the Dutch settlers to last in the hot climate. They last forever and have to be dunked in hot tea or coffee. ( the famous ones are called ' Ouma Rusks' )



    in a large bowl ( or sometimes easier in Two )mix 1.5 kg of flour , 3 teaspoons each of baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, cream of tartar and salt.

    300grams of butter cubed, and rub into the flour mix





    in a jug add 2 cups of buttermilk , 2eggs, 2cups of brown sugar and a cup of oil ( we use canola )

    sometimes we substitute some condensed milk or maple syrup to the mix for flavour
    eg. one and a half cups of buttermilk and half a cup of condensed milk

    pour this into the dry dry ingredients slowly , reserve some liquid incase the mix is too wet, just mix as you go


    make a nice dough


    then form into golf balls , this is fun for the kids to do


    pack them tightly into greased baking tins and bake in a medium oven 180 -200 c for about thirty minutes ( till they look nice and golden brown but bounce back to the touch, not squishy.


    turn out onto a rack and let cool for twenty minutes ,leave the oven on, but turn down low to 80- 100 c


    when they have cooled, break them apart , place them on oven trays and bake again ( or dry out ) for about 4 hours. Break a couple apart to make sure they are completly dry inside




    They will come out dry and they make heaps of crumbs but last for weeks and weeks, great for dunking in tea or coffee on canoe trips.



    Best with Rooibos Tea

    you can add all sorts of extras to flavour , cinnamon , vanilla , raisins etc , whatever takes your fancy
    our latest batch had dried cranberries and chocolate chips

    This recipe makes about eighty Rusks
    takes a few batches too get perfect though.

    Cheers

    Tomo-hawk
    Last edited by Tomo-hawk; 11th-June-2010 at 01:43 AM.

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    Were those little undercut islands made of limestone? Dimly, I have visualized New Zealand as being volcanic or metamorphic.

  5. #5

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    Good day out you had Tomo. How long did it take you?

  6. #6
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    Default Great stuff

    but the fishing rod......no story there?The overview of the loch and the route you took are interesting.Red Leaf tea,why we have it here too noo and it is brawwillie
    "Every action of our lives touches on
    some chord that will vibrate in eternity"

    Edwin Hubbel Chapin

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    Great blogg, always great to see other parts of the world. Thanks for taking the time to do it!!
    Cheers,

    Alan


  8. #8
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    Ezwater , yeah NZ has some remarkable land forms in a small space from the glacier formed lakes in the South Island to our Volcanic caldera lakes in the North. Around our area there is about twelve larger lakes and many more smaller(and sometimes hot) formed from volcanic activity anywhere from a couple of hundred thousand years ago to just over a hundred years ago.
    many of the lakes have these little islands around the edge which are either boulders flung out of volcanoes or rock falls from the cliffs around . They make for interesting little diversions. Still alot of thermal activity around many of the lake edges.

    Hey , Brainflex, I got on the water at eleven and very leisurely paddled to the hot pools which I got to at two thirty after a couple of stops. Soaked for an hour then took from three thirty till six to get back to Hinehopu. Could have been quicker but I was soakin in the'vibes', pools cost 7.50 adult and couple of bucks for kids, had the place to myself though they can get busier during the holidays , only access is by boat/canoe.

    Packman ,yeah I had a few half hearted casts around and saw a couple of nice rainbow trout rise , but will have to get out for a proper go soon, maybe on Lake Tarawera where if they are over 65cm you have to put them back.
    I love that saying Braw ! where does it come from.
    Last edited by Tomo-hawk; 11th-June-2010 at 09:19 AM.

  9. #9
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    Excellent blogg, nice to see another part of the world.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

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    Great blogg. About to promote your recipe post to the front of the site.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  11. #11
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    Excellent blog.

    I love those giant ferns and the other vegetation!

    What kind of canoe is that btw? Looks interesting.

    "I stepped up on the platform. The man gave me the news. He said - you must be joking, son, where did you get those shoes?"

    Crow Trip Log

  12. #12
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    My guess and probably wrong (always happens when I stick my neck out) is a Selway Fisher Wren.

    It looks just like the one I made 15 years ago, although Tomo-hawk has done a better job than I did.

    Doug
    When there's trouble on shore, there's peace on the wave,
    Afloat in the White Canoe.
    Alan Sullivan


  13. #13
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    Nice one
    Bandy

    CLICK THE LINK TO THE SCOTTISH CANOE TRIPS CHANNEL FOR VIDEOS OF MY TRIPS : http://www.youtube.com/user/bandy598



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    Great blog and pictures, although it didn't quite live up to my initial expectation based on the title.

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    Great blog. As Chainsaw said, one of the best things about SotP is getting to see where other people paddle.

    "Braw" is Scots, though you're more likely to hear it in the east of the country.
    Jim

    "God guard me from those thoughts men think
    In the mind alone;
    He that sings a lasting song
    Thinks in a marrowbone."

  16. #16

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    "Braw" is scottish and is the equivalent of NZ "sweet as"

    Go and confuse everyone now using braw instead. I will listen out for it and lets see (listen?) how it spreads!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomo-hawk View Post
    ... then form into golf balls , this is fun for the kids to do
    Good for getting their hands clean too ...
    Nice to see other places (especially so far away).

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    What a great blog and a fantastic area. That's just what Coniston could do with. Some hot springs.
    It's turned out nice again!

  19. #19
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    Enjoyed reading your blogg. and thanks for sharing the recipe I will try it out
    My belt holds my pants up, but the belt loops hold my belt up.
    I don't really know what's happening down there. Who is the real hero?

  20. #20
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    Crow, doug is right , Selway Fisher Wren , next project is a SF prospector .
    Glad you all enjoyed the different scenery
    Thanks MagiKelly for posting the blogg to the recipe section, hope people give it a go.

    Tomo

  21. Default Moist rusks?

    Howdee, I came across this blogg after reading your recipe page (very nice - the page, I haven't tried making the rusks yet!). I was wondering what they're like if you don't dry them? Are they doughy? I guess they'd be a lot heavier. Just wondered cos I'm not a big fan of hard, dry snacks, not that I'm missing any teeth or anything!

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