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Thread: How to make energy cookies

  1. #1

    Default How to make energy cookies

    Well, this is really all you need:


    Syrup, sugar, oats and cream.

    1 equivalent of sirup, 1 equivalent of sugar and 1 equivalent of cream are stirred together in pot. Heat it up til it starts boiling then it shall boil until...



    You can pour some of this boiling liquid


    into a glass of cold water and then roll it into a ball.


    Then 7-8 equivalents of oats are about to be made into a dough mixture by using the hot toffee mass as a cohesive agent. 1 equivalent can be any volume unit, for example a cup, a deciliter, a pint etc. Syrup: sugar: cream: oats - 1:1:1:7(or 8) equivalents.


    If you want to, you can add extra ingredients. For example peanuts, walnuts, cashew nuts, sunrose seeds and chocolate. This might demand more cohesive agent. I dubbled the amount in order to melt this nut mixture into the oat-toffee dough.





    This instrument was used for the process of chocolate flavouring the nutty mixture.


    Chocolate added:


    So, oats and chocolate flavoured nuts are mixed together and hot toffee are poured over. Stir this sweet tough dough with a firm hand. After that, form the cookies into an apropriate shape.

    Energy cookies in a 2l ice cream box, weighing in at 1½ kg.

    Then you go canoeing.



    If you're lazy, bring energy cookies. 2 cookies = 1 oatmeal plus toffee and a handfull of nuts.



    If you don't need them that much, then go canoeing again. Eventually, there'll be no left-overs.

    Last edited by Zealot; 16th-May-2010 at 11:15 PM.

  2. #2
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    Nice one! I can feel my waist expanding already.

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

  3. #3
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    they sound very tasty! need to try your recipe...

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    Default

    Very good. Promoted to an article. The first in our recipes section.

  5. #5
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    Excellent idea, going to have to try these.
    Bacon sarnie anyone ?

  6. #6
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    Excellent! I have been testing out high energy foods for extended paddling and many are not paletable after working hard for 5 or 6 hours - however, these look like an exciting addition. I will test them on Saturday. I was going to ask about shelf life.. DOH!

    Graham

  7. #7

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    The recipe was "invented" by Rune Larsson, the man who crossed the atlantic in a rowing boat. I found it on his website http://www.loparlarsson.se/ and just added nuts, chocolate and some more toffee to the original recipe.

    With the exclusion of nuts and chocolate you get energy cookies with a pricetag of 20kr(=1½£)/kg. I made 5kg (almost 4 2l ice cream boxes full) this time and it costed me about 10£.

    This weekend one of my friends had 2 days to spend on canoeing. We've been talking about canoe tripping down a 4 day (outfitter recommendation) trail in Småland for a while and thought this was a good weekend to go. This trail is only 60km so 2 days seemed like plenty of time, but then portages, trees in the water etc could slow us down a lot and we really didn't know how fast we could go in the outfitters aluminium barges (Linder 525 with lots of scars).

    The first day we paddled 9am to 10pm and completed 40km. The next day the paddling were easier so the last 20km were completed in 4hours and we had plenty of time for fishing, relaxing and eating...

    It's time to get going. Some non-canoeists on the other side of the river pretend not to be jealous.


    On our way, 9am.

    13th of may and the trees are still not green


    In the woods a lone rich mans resident by the shore of the Gristorpa lake.

    An old mill

    Reflections

    Yet another mill

    The remains of a mill

    It's getting late and we can't decide whether we wan't to keep going or choose a campsite.

    Some rapid and the remains of a mill. It's 9:30 pm and we start to feel a little weary.


    Campsite the next morning.


    It's day two and a bridge in the woods.


    Time for lunch. River Lagan in the background.


    A bridge that will not last a thousand years.


    Lagan is eating the land.



    Candyman holds his alu canoe


    All the photos were taken by Erik, a solid friend.
    Last edited by Zealot; 17th-May-2010 at 06:28 PM.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamC View Post
    Excellent! I have been testing out high energy foods for extended paddling and many are not paletable after working hard for 5 or 6 hours - however, these look like an exciting addition. I will test them on Saturday. I was going to ask about shelf life..

    Graham

    I think shelf life is good, better than that for bread. Sugar and syrup and oats has very good shelf life, the cream stirs the combination up a little, but the water content in these cookies is very low.

    The 24hour challenge sounds really great!

  9. #9
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    zealot, how do those alu linders perform? most swedish outfitters seem to use them.

    last time i went to sweden i took my own canoe because i hadn't tried the linders before, and wasn't sure how they would work out. in terms of air fare vs. hire cost it's pretty much the same, however, and if they can save me lugging my own boat through the airport it might be worth it if they're not too sluggish.

  10. #10

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    Lowlander, the Alu Linders are not slivers in any sense of the word. They are nothing but barges that can take a lot of beating. To drag them faster than 3-4km/h will take a lot of effort and most the energy will turn into the making of bigger waves around the bow.

    I've read that foldables are sensitive when it comes to sticks such as broken branches of fallen trees. Have you had any problem with that? That might be a source to a lot of foul language along some rivers in the southern part of Sweden, where fallen trees has not been taken away after the big storms Gudrun and Per a couple of years ago.

    Most waters in close vicinity to a outfitter are for sure nicer to paddle in a foldable sliver than an aluminium barge.

  11. #11
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    Looks like a great little booster. I make granola with very similar ingredients and a not all to different technique. When it comes out of the oven I press it down to get some nice clusters. Once I used a bit to much honey and brown sugar and after pressing it down and letting it cool it stuck together all a bit too well. Ever since I have been making my own granola bars, sometimes a bit chewy but they do the trick...

    Great pictures by the way, thanks.
    bird, coyote, cow pie.... don't make no sense to me nohow...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot View Post
    I've read that foldables are sensitive when it comes to sticks such as broken branches of fallen trees. Have you had any problem with that? That might be a source to a lot of foul language along some rivers in the southern part of Sweden, where fallen trees has not been taken away after the big storms Gudrun and Per a couple of years ago.

    Most waters in close vicinity to a outfitter are for sure nicer to paddle in a foldable sliver than an aluminium barge.
    thanks for your comments on the linder, sounds like i made the right decision to lug my boat-in-a-bag.

    the skin of the folder is actually remarkably tough. i haven't had anything puncture it yet. in theory, of course, a strong branch that's broken off to a sharp and sturdy point could go through but i think in most cases the branch would break under the pressure or slip off before it goes through the skin.
    it is, however, not impossible and that's why you carry a repair kit

    while i haven't had any problems i have to admit that i don't do much fast flowing rivers. i'm in the wrong country for that.

  13. #13
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    Hey , great looking recipe , just wondering about the syrup , would this be a straight sugar syrup (we have whats called 'golden syrup' out here ) or maybe use maple syrup ?
    And it must be compulsory to sing
    " Yorn desh born, der ritt de gitt der gue, Orn desh, dee born desh, de urm, Bork ! Bork ! Bork ! " whilst baking them, then throw the wooden spoons in the air .

    I like how not finishing your cookie supply means another canoe trip to finish them off.

    The photos of the trip are great .

    cheers
    Tomo-hawk
    Last edited by Tomo-hawk; 20th-May-2010 at 10:05 AM. Reason: atrocious spelling

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomo-hawk View Post
    Hey , great looking recipe , just wondering about the syrup , would this be a straight sugar syrup (we have whats called 'golden syrup' out here ) or maybe use maple syrup
    Swedish syrup is made from beet sugar. Maple would be overkill, but a small addition might help as a flavouring.

  15. #15
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    Smile Perfect!

    Well I made some today and wow they are good! I used golden syrup, white sugar and single cream. I did think of using a high grade meusli but settled for simple rolled oats. The result is soft, sticky flapjack. For years I have tried to make sticky flapjack and never managed to get a perfect recipe - well this is it! A major advantage is that this recipe does not require an oven, so, if they all get eaten, a simple gas burner can be used when camping to rustle up a new batch with stuff from the corner shop.

    I am racing tomorrow and "Zealot's energy cookies" will be the fuel - secret weapon

    Graham

  16. #16
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    Default The perfect fuel!

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamC View Post

    I am racing tomorrow and "Zealot's energy cookies" will be the fuel - secret weapon

    Graham
    I promised Zealot that I would update this blogg with the result of the race.

    I ate two cookies before the race then got in a K2 that I had never even seen before with a partner I had never met, to paddle a river I had only seen on a map. We decided that we didn't need to know the course well as we would follow someone else. Imagine our shock when we shot off the start only to find that we were in the lead! After that we just kept going and after 4 miles came in a minute in front of the next boat.


    WE WON!


    I am now cooking up a big batch to fuel my Cheshire Ring attempt.

    Many thanks to Zealot for posting a winning formula!

    Graham

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