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Thread: Selway Fisher Hazelnut build

  1. #1
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    Default Selway Fisher Hazelnut build

    Well today postie delivered a brown envelope postmarked 'Melksham' containing a set of plans for the Hazelnut.

    My original intention had been to build a Raven but, after reading what seems like hundreds of threads on here, a Peterborough type seemed more suited to my needs (and prettier as well) - essentially still water on the Norfolk Broads, mainly solo (but in company with SWMBO + ankle biters in kks) short trips from a fixed base in the evenings or when the wind no blow for proper .

    I have built from Paul Fisher's designs before (Stornoway 9' dinghy with built in buoyancy additional to his plans - can be viewed on either the SF Yahoo Group or here for those interested) so the technical process gives me no concerns, but be prepared for lots of issues as the fitting out proceeds.

    I will be getting materials together in the New Year and then pushing on as the temperature allows. The aim is to have her on the water by the end of July at the latest, although Easter would be nice. This thread will (hopefully) be my conscience pushing me on.

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    i read your post, then i read the thread you linked to, i'm still not too sure what it is your building though.

    Sounds fun though, any pictures?

    edit: ah, i did some googling

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/Opcan16.htm

    is it one of these?



    if it is then i'm very excited for you and expect to see updates on here with pictures!
    Last edited by nakedfiremaker; 20th-December-2009 at 06:26 PM.

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    That one is the Peterborough.

    The Hazelnut is here (select from the index or scroll down to second from bottom) and russj1975 has posted his build here.

    The other link was merely an indicator of my previous build, sorry if it confused.

    Pics will follow as the build progresses

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    i think i am definitely going to build one of these one day.

    I hadnt realised that you could build them so easily

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    Smile No more excuses

    Well this morning (whilst 'working from home - well I was just taking a break, honest boss!) I acquired 4 sheets of 4mm 'marine' ply and 15m of 20x40mm pine for in/outwhales. This is it, can't prevaricate any more - I must get on with it now.
    First job tonight is to turn the garage back into a boatbuilding shop instead of general dumping ground; then I will loft and cut out planks over the weekend.

    I am going to keep a running 'totaliser' on this build as I want to try and keep an eye on costs. I'm not going for a budget build, but want to do a 'proper job' without getting carried away as is so easy to do. Costings so far:

    Plans 41.00
    Ply 54.05
    Pine 11.50
    Total 106.55

    Next and hopefully last major purchase will be resin and tape. Still trying to decide whether to sheath the outside or not - use will be all still water so tempted to say no, but slightly concerned about strength as using 4mm ply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnm View Post
    Still trying to decide whether to sheath the outside or not - use will be all still water so tempted to say no, but slightly concerned about strength as using 4mm ply.
    I in the same position with my Peterborough build (also 4mm ply) and like you it'll only be used in still waters.

    I think I'm going sheathless but with a couple of goods coats of resin.

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    Hey, Titus,

    As I said, still undecided and hoping for feedback here. My initial thoughts are pretty much the same as yours, especially as a layer of mat can be added later if I think it needs some more strength after completion.

    Did you have any joy with your sawtooth join experiments? I am going to use it on this build and so will be drawing out this weekend I hope

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    I decided to go for the easy option of glass tape + epoxy on both faces.

    I didn't like the way all sawtooth joints would line up like a zipper

    The accuracy needed for the joints also means slow progress and I just want to get on.
    I am looking forward (not) to a weekend of planing, fortunately my work area is next to my computer so I can take a break now and again.

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    Default Progress at last

    Well, in the shed for 5 1/2 hours today before the cold forced me to draw stumps.

    So sheet one lofted using the station plan from SF Design, a sharp pencil and the old trusty length of curtain rail
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/47089860@N02/4319330265/

    Planks rough cut using a hand pull saw - this 4mm stuff is so much eaier to handle than the 6 & 9mm stuff I'm used to!
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...7623197536483/

    Then faired to the line using the trusty surform, backed up with a spokeshave on the tighter concave sections.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...7623197536483/

    I took the opportunity to mark up the sawtooth pattern to be used to join the planks. As this will be visible if I decide to bright finish either inside or out, I have drawn this up as a continuous pattern that should provide a smoother look to the eye in the finished product.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...7623197536483/

    Finally set the faired planks out ready to draw out the next sets of planks. I have snugged the planks up, rather than copying the station plan layout again, as this gives me enough clean wood from the 3 remaining sheets to come up with 2 temporary 'former' moulds and 2 permanent bulkheads.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...7623197536483/

    Tomorrow night will be cutting out the remaining planks, progress appears to e nice and quick so far. Hopefully the weather will warm up ready for epoxy work - note to self, order epoxy tomorrow!
    Last edited by johnm; 31st-January-2010 at 09:55 PM. Reason: Trying to get the hang ofthe photo thing having just got one of these online photo account things

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus A Duxass View Post
    I in the same position with my Peterborough build (also 4mm ply) and like you it'll only be used in still waters.

    I think I'm going sheathless but with a couple of goods coats of resin.
    I am mainly flat water too, but I am happy with the glass sheath. At many portages on the Thames or the canal network you are hauling your boat over a concrete sill. Whilst there is a trick you can do with a trolley, there is still the possibility of sill-to-hull contact, so IMO glass makes you stronger in that sitution.
    Well the forecast said it would be good...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameshcox View Post
    I am mainly flat water too, but I am happy with the glass sheath. At many portages on the Thames or the canal network you are hauling your boat over a concrete sill. Whilst there is a trick you can do with a trolley, there is still the possibility of sill-to-hull contact, so IMO glass makes you stronger in that sitution.
    Good point about the sill contact, I don't think I'll be meeting many sills. I'll be doing freshwater lakes and maybe a bit of beach work.
    A lower half sheath could be a good "compromise" giving durability to the sensitive bottom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus A Duxass View Post
    A lower half sheath could be a good "compromise" giving durability to the sensitive bottom.
    Yes indeed, thats essentially what I have.
    Well the forecast said it would be good...

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    I built a SF Prospector 2 years ago. I used 4mm ply, which without some sort of stiffening is too flexible in the middle of the hull. Fisher recommends one way to overcome this is to put thin strips of ply from side to side. My solution was to use a layer of 18 oz woven roving fiberglass mat 4 foot long,and from waterline to waterline inside the canoe. The result has been excellent, it gives a great deal of strength in the middle of the boat,when loaded up with camping gear, and is flexible enough to' give' when running aground in the shallows. I don't' think it is necessary to sheath the canoe it just adds weight to a very light canoe with very little gain. A coat of epoxy on the ply, and finish with a good paint system is all that is needed for a strong durable boat

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    Haven't posted for the last few days, but work has progressed!

    Having cut out all the plank sets, the next step was to cut out the saw tooth joins:
    Marked up and clamped in pairs
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/47089860@N02/4345728590/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    The opposing pairs were then marked up
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    And cut
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    Resulting in five sets of matched planks
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    Which were then joined using thickened epoxy
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/
    (I knew there was a good reason for hanging onto those old slabs)

    Once cured and the excess trimmed that had us up to Sunday (17.5 hours of build time so far)

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    Default Preparing for stitching

    Next stage was to prepare for stitching which means lots of holes all matched up - prior experience is that this is tedious
    After some discussion with others (thanks Titus and Tony) I came up with a handy little tool made from a piece of 5mm batten cut to 12mm width with a stub nail as a pivot and a hole at 20cm for pricking through with another nail.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

    This made setting out stitch holes much easier and I was averaging 15-20 minutes a plank to mark and drill.

    The fnal preparation for stitching was to cut out the permanent bulkheads and temporary moulds required to hold the shape
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/

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    Default Stitching

    In previous 'stitch and tape' builds I used wire ties to stitch with and cursed every step of the way - wire is hard on the fingers and is also difficult to tighten evenly and gradually. This time I am using tie wraps as an easier option for 20 odd ties per plank!
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/4708986...n/photostream/
    Having connected three planks loosely, I can vouch for it being easier and definitely quicker
    hopefully they will take the strain when everything is tightened up!

    3 planks stitched in about 10 mins a plank makes me think that all is going well (21.5 hours build time to date)
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/47089860@N02/4347260724/
    - then I laid the bulkheads out ready to start stitching them in
    At this point I realised that whil I had thought ahead and marked the bulkhead/mould positions on the master plank set, I hadn't transferred those lines to the rest of the planks
    First job tomorrow night - lots of measuring and marking to get the bulkhead/mould positions right
    Ah well; win some, lose some
    Last edited by johnm; 10th-February-2010 at 10:29 PM. Reason: spolling - excuse is too much wine whilst warming up from the shed......hic

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnm View Post
    In previous 'stitch and tape' builds I used wire ties to stitch with and cursed every step of the way - wire is hard on the fingers and is also difficult to tighten evenly and gradually. This time I am using tie wraps as an easier option for 20 odd ties per plank!
    That's interesting, this time I went with wire because I couldn't get the cable ties to do what I wanted. Yes wire is much harder in the hands - but as the saying goes "no pain, no gain"


    Quote Originally Posted by johnm View Post
    At this point I realised that whil I had thought ahead and marked the bulkhead/mould positions on the master plank set, I hadn't transferred those lines to the rest of the planks
    You're not the only one!

  18. #18
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    Seems you're flying along. There's plenty who use cable-ties, hope they work out for you.

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

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    An hour or so of measuring and marking for bulkhead and temporary mould positions, 1/2 hour getting the last couple of planks loosely in place, then..............
    .....zip!


    Ok, I've still got to stitch the bow and stern but at least it looks like a canoe

    Soon or more likely
    Last edited by KeithD; 24th-February-2010 at 09:55 AM. Reason: helping with photos

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    An hour yesterday to set the bow/stern stitches and tighten most of the stitches before being distracted by visitors. A quick half hour today to finish tightening stitches and.......


    The value of accurate work creating the planks is proved by the fact that she has come up tight and square with no need to fettle anything (even around the bow/stern). I am also really chuffed with the decision to use cable ties - they are very simple to use, kind on the hands and you can't overtighten them (only using 2.5mm ties)! Previously, with wire, I found it very easy to overtighten - with the ties you can just zip them all up to slight tension and then take up final tension, too tight and they snap off.
    Unfortunately the weather is now against me with forecasts of -4 for tonight and -3 for tomorrow and even next week maxima of 6 and minma of 3 - without being able to heat the shed I am going to struggle to do epoxy work.
    Last edited by KeithD; 24th-February-2010 at 09:57 AM. Reason: Helping with Photos

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    Looking good, you're making fantastic progress.
    Hope the weather bucks up for you soon.

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    Progress over the last few days has been a bit sporadic and hampered by freezing overnight temperatures. However, this morning saw all the seams filleted internally.

    Hopefully the fillets will be cured enough to sand smooth tomorrow before then taping the seams.

    Build time now up to 32.5 hours - BTW I hate filleting, especially when it's cold!
    Last edited by KeithD; 24th-February-2010 at 10:00 AM. Reason: Helping with photo

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    So 8 hours work over the last 3 days has all the fillets sanded and the tapes then cut

    Spot the surveyor's OCD

    All tapes were applied and, as expected, the cold temperatures have caused a bloom

    I'm not too concerned about the bloom as I will be painting the interior.

    Also took the opportunity to cut out the holes for the bulkhead inspection hatches - note to self: remember to cut out the holes before epoxying them in place it's much easier! Second note to self - read your own previous build bloggs that remind you to do this!
    Last edited by KeithD; 24th-February-2010 at 10:05 AM. Reason: helping with photos

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    Big thanks to Keith for sorting the pics out
    Unfortunately I am an IT numpty and am having issues trying to make this work
    so herewith a random pic - I hope - of my pride and joy (and no I don't mean SWMBO)



    Well that worked! Not quite the way Keth explained but hey, what the heck!
    Last edited by johnm; 24th-February-2010 at 08:13 PM. Reason: It worked!

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    Well here is the next update. Following on from the internal taping the boat was inverted for the outside seams to be filled. At this point I have kept the temporary struts in place and not fitted inwhales/outwhales as I want to sheath the outside first.
    After another 4 hours work all the outside seams were filled. I then had to leave the build for a week due to other commitments. This did allow all resin applied so far to cure fully, unfortuntely that just made the sanding task harder
    2 1/2 hours hard graft with belt and orbital sanders on Monday night and she was ready for sheathing.

    The sheathing material was then laid over the hull

    This is a 5mx1m length of glass fibre cloth from UK Epoxy Resins. The stunning part was the way that it laid over the hull and moulded to fit with no darts required except around the curve of the bow. Having laid out the sheathing material, I intended to use the dry lay-up method to save having to try and lay the cloth out over a wetted hull and so stapled everything in place. DISASTER for some reason the cloth would not wet out properly - I suspect that it was too cold and the resin was not penetrating through to the wood. Recovering this meant reverting to a wet lay-up method and somehow getting resin under the quarter of the sheath that had already been wetted out. This needed some quick work to repair the damage within the pot life of the resin already applied.

    However in the end it was a success and the above pic shows the hull with the first coat of resin squeegeed out. I would have liked to get a second coat on tonight, unfortunately it is going to be too cold so it looks like another delay for a full cure and more sanding before I can progress.

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    Default Welcome to winter epoxying..

    for some reason the cloth would not wet out properly - I suspect that it was too cold and the resin was not penetrating through to the wood.
    Not all resins are the same, but they do thicken up substantially as the temperature cools.

    When I built my boat I found that at 12 degrees the epoxy I planned to use was really viscous, but I had some West System 105/206 which was plenty runny enough. Since I had loads of the former and not much of the latter, 6kw of fan heaters took the garage to a cosy 19 degrees where the cheaper resin was runny enough to use.
    Well the forecast said it would be good...

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    Yes, I knew I was under the general operating temperatures but I have an Easter deadline

    Quote Originally Posted by jameshcox View Post
    a cosy 19 degrees
    would be really nice, but with a large wooden shed that you can see daylight through in places I would need to be a mexican telecoms billionaireto be able to achieve that

    No real problem as the wet lay-up has worked really well with only a couple of minor runs around the bow/stern curves. With today and tomorrow to cure, Saturday will be the day to re-key and apply the next coat during the "warmth" of the day (should manage that before the traumas of the Calcutta Cup )

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    Well progress has been intermittent in the last couple of weeks with work and family commitments. Also not helped by the low temperatures and high humidity making the epoxy take FOREVER to cure .

    Having finally got her back the right way up, it was carpentry time - inwhales first; cut to length and with 10cm insert blocks at 15cm gap spacing from a centre block of 20cm (double length to accommodate centre thwart/brace/yoke.


    Supports for the decks were also fitted in the bow/stern compartments using some 18x18mm stock left over from previous dinghy builds.



    The decks were cut from scrap 4mm ply left from the plank sheets using a simple cardboard template (laid over and outlined from underneath around the edge of the hull - no phot because I got carried away and forgot). As I had some narrow 4mm pine strip kicking around, I gdecided to "get fancy" (as SWMBO accused) and inset this down the centreline to contrast the deck and blend with the gunwhales.

    The back edge was brought back in a gentle curve to meet the gunwhale to both give a more pleasing shape and cover up the fact that to get the rather meaty inwhales in they had to be trimmed and ended up a little short! - I'm not too fussed about this as the current pine will be replaced by ash at some point in the future. The hull was lowered by 4mm to take the deck plate and allow the outwhale to cover the ply end grain before the deck was ftted and screwed down.

    The screw holes are countersunk and the screws will be used as a feature and to allow future aintenance rather than being fitted using epoxy as a permanent seal. The outwhale was then fitted using screws centred on the inwhale insert blocks (the centre thwart has been made up from a piece of 50x25mm Douglas Fir left from a previous build and will be replaced by a purpose made yoke idc)

    The distance had to be halved around the curve of the bow (in the area covered by the buoyancy compartment) to cope with the double curve and hold the outwhale to it.

    The build is now at this stage, the slightly disheartening thing is that it has all got to come off again for the paintng and varnishing stage which starts tonight. The Easter completion is looking unlikely, but I an not going to rush the finishing stages for the sake of a week or so.

  29. #29
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    Nice progress.
    Your Inwhale block dimensions are useful, I've been mulling these over for a while now.
    Neutiquam Erro

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    No problem Titus. Nothing hugely technical in the way I did it, more a case of working out something that looked right .

    The insert blocks also had all their edges rounded off to aid in water drainage - at least that's the theory!

    I haven't looked at what happens if the seat hangings coincide with a gap yet - I suspect extra infilling may be needed at that point

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    Disassembly completed! Here comes the varnish shop.

    First coat at 50/50 varnish/thinners - another of those followed by 3 at 75/25 and 2 final coats unthinned. The hull will be painted in the meantime.

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    Heigh Ho! Back to the grindstone after a week off (decking, gate hanging, painting - really restful. Not!).
    A quick sand down on Monday and on goes the varnish and paintwork treadmill
    All the gunwhales and decks have now had 2 coats at 50/50 and 4 at 75/25(ish) - one more of the thinned variety than I would normally do because these areas are likely to take more of a bashing than genral saily/stinkie brightwork and also because I mixed up too much for coat 3 . 1 unthinned coat to go whilst disassembled and then a final coat to seal over all screw holes and finish off once re-assembled
    The outer hull has now had 2 coats of primer and tonight was the first undercoat - 2 more of those and then 2 topcoat. The interior painting will commence once the bulkhead varnish has had a chance to harden and I can then get masking tape in place around the edges of the fillets.

    With any luck all will be complete ready for my next trip to the Broads in a couple of weeks (for our trans-Atlantic cousins that's the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads - a series of inland waterways in eastern England - and not what you thought! ).
    Then


    probably closely followed by....



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    I haven't updated in the last couple of weeks as even thinking of pictures and descriptions of applying coats of paint bores me rigid Enough to say that there have been 2 coats of primer, 3 undercoat and 2 topcoat inside and out.
    Started to replace the inwhales last night:

    Tonight was decks, outwhales and yoke




    Tomorrow I will fit the hatch covers before loading for transport to Norfolk to see if she floats

    Seats are an ongoing project but I want to try and work out where best to place them by checking afloat trim first.

    I suspect the white interior will be too dazzling in the summer, if so expect it to turn cream.

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    So after a typically British holiday weekend, to complete the story.....

    On Friday, hatch covers were fitted and she finally saw the light







    The observant reader will have noted the glaring absence of any form of seating arrangements but unfortunately time ran out and the cross-country (England that is!) journey to her operating grounds loomed.......

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    And on Saturday (the only decent day of the weekend - in Norfolk anyway!) ..............



    she floats! Mind you, the state of my knees afterwards means that it won't be long before the seats are finished and fitted!

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    Congrats, she's a beaut.
    I'll crack open a couple of bottles of Pilsner Urquell tonight to celebrate your success.

    You've also made me feel guilty, I've done nothing on mine for weeks.
    Neutiquam Erro

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    So, the last 10 days have seen the seat frames glued up and 7 coats of varnish applied.

    Next step will be to attach the webbing.
    The paddle in the foreground was an old one that I think my father must have knocked up 40 or so years ago. It was square tipped and had no grip - so after some quick work with some Douglas Fir off-cuts, Balcotan, clamps and a surform - it now has a quasi-ottertail shape and a grip. Not sure how it will handle, but it will certainly do as an onboard spare.
    The oar to the right is part of a pair that I took the opportunity to rennovate whilst the varnish was out.
    At the same time I have been trying to sort out the hanging method - I have the stainless bolts, but needed spacers. Step in an old beach windbreak support which has been chopped into suitable lengths and drilled out. In order to preserve these they will be varnished but first I have soaked them in linseed oil to try and protect the inner sections.

    Varnishing these started today and they should be finished by the end of the week., leaving me several days in hand before the 1/2 term exped when they will be fitted.

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    Varnishing the seat hanging spacers is proceeding and should complete with coat 7 on Saturday

    Seats were webbed last night - surprisingly quick and

    apparently effective I have sat down with no obvious flexing so reasonably confident that they will work long term

  39. #39

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    Hi Johnm
    What a great looking canoe,

    have you fitted the seat's yet?

    How did you fasten the webbing to the wood ??

    Cheers
    Spud

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    Spud,
    Thanks for that, I thought the design was good looking which was why I chose it
    The seats have indeed been fitted - I can't lay my hands on any pics at the moment but will try and post some when I can.
    The webbing was secured using a heavy duty stapler and seems to be standing up well - albeit to not particularly heavyloading.

  41. Default

    Nice work keep it up

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