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Thread: What Kind of Stove

  1. #1
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    Default What Kind of Stove

    Mainly thinking home wood stoves. What kind of wood stove (or heating unit) do you use or think is best?

    We have quite a few wood stoves and fireplaces. My favorite wood stove has always been an Ashly airtight. It is a very simple box stove - nothing special - just does what it is supposed to do, and keeps a fire all night. We've had three of them now, and they've all been very good.

    This is the type (below) we've always had (I can't believe the price!). I think we paid $75 for the first one we bought. The one we have now, we paid $400. We have it in the basement for backup when the temps get in the minus 30 range.

    http://www.usstove.com/cgi-bin/csvse...ivid.pl?ID=144

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    I have never even seen a stove like that. Over here most people have central heating from gas or oil fuelled boiler. I still have open fireplaces in a few rooms that we use for additional heating and atmosphere.

    In more rural areas you will get wood fuelled heating used more but I suspect nothing like as much as in your neck of the woods.
    John

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    Fore pure enjoyment I like the old kitchen stoves.

    My earliest memories involve a stove like this even though the photo is of a modern airtight reproduction. I used to sit around and drink tea and dry my wool socks by one of these. Not sure if tea drinking is a normal thing for 3 year olds or not but it was in my family. They are only about 3 generations removed from the campfire for social proposes; in this part of Canada there is the tradition of the ceilidh and many of them started around one of these but I have never seen one start around a modern gas or electric. Every woman in my family that has ever had to cook on one or light a fire to heat bath water for the kids is glad they are a thing of the past but I only have about 2 good childhood memories and one involves this type of wood fired cook stove.

    For a modern stove I like the new Napoleons out of Barrie Ontario, they are good for modern sized homes but you would need a few for the average farm house.
    http://www.napoleonfireplaces.com/We...ves/1100c.html
    Lloyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Fore pure enjoyment I like the old kitchen stoves.

    My earliest memories involve a stove like this even though the photo is of a modern airtight reproduction. I used to sit around and drink tea and dry my wool socks by one of these. Not sure if tea drinking is a normal thing for 3 year olds or not but it was in my family. They are only about 3 generations removed from the campfire for social proposes; in this part of Canada there is the tradition of the ceilidh and many of them started around one of these but I have never seen one start around a modern gas or electric. Every woman in my family that has ever had to cook on one or light a fire to heat bath water for the kids is glad they are a thing of the past but I only have about 2 good childhood memories and one involves this type of wood fired cook stove.

    For a modern stove I like the new Napoleons out of Barrie Ontario, they are good for modern sized homes but you would need a few for the average farm house.
    http://www.napoleonfireplaces.com/We...ves/1100c.html

    There is nothing like home made bread out of a wood cook stove. My mother used to make the best bread I have ever tasted. Of course we all thought it such a treat to get store bought bread. In recent years I've tried to get the recipe from her, but she doesn't remember it. It was all handfuls and pinches. We have a wood cook stove out in the bunk house and I really would like to try to bake bread in it. Soon as the rush is over.

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    Theres alot of people still running of solid fuel stoves for their cooking and heating here in the islands (although as MK points out oil and electric are taking over) but with no wood we rely on peat as the main fuel source. Heres a typical Lewis stove



    that'll do your radiators and water as well as your cooking and is kept on all the time, typically people will also have a single gas burner working off a calor gas bottle. Peat cutting and stacking is a real art heres an example


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    Do you build peat sheds or turf sheds to keep it dry? I can't imagine soggy peat burning too well. Is there a special process for separating out the iron age sacrifice victims as well?
    Lloyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    There is nothing like home made bread out of a wood cook stove. My mother used to make the best bread I have ever tasted. Of course we all thought it such a treat to get store bought bread. In recent years I've tried to get the recipe from her, but she doesn't remember it. It was all handfuls and pinches. We have a wood cook stove out in the bunk house and I really would like to try to bake bread in it. Soon as the rush is over.
    My grandmother would probably be the same age as your mom and stopped making bread for the most part too when someone got her a bread maker for Christmas one year. She doesn't miss the cook stove though. She had it from the late 30's to the mid 80's. She got her first electric in about 78 but kept the cook stove too for the winter. It was finally retired about 87. Her biggest issue was all the wool socks hanging in the kitchen drying by the cook stove when we worked in the woods. My grandfather would take off his boots and they would be full of saw dust which most often she would get to clean up. I can still see the same argument today when I visit. Granddad insists that "it is all clean saw dust".
    Lloyd

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    We have a Jotul wood burning stove compleate with traditional scandinavian blessing on the side.

    Like the one in this link. http://www.jotuluk.com/content/produ...e____3645.aspx

    It is very efficent and has a very high capacity. Unfortunatly it doesn't have a back boiler for water and we do have oil fired heating as well, but this will heat the whole house on its own when it going. We have a few power cuts out here and I've cooked plenty meals on and in it even though thats not really what it was designed for.

    Our neighbours have one Identical but it had been used with coal and it developed a huge crack down the side. They still use it, one of these days I'm sure their house will burn down.

    Ours came with the house which is lucky as we could buy another three canoes with what it would cost.

    Hmmm. There's an Idea .
    ( only joking I really like this stove )
    ( I like canoes more though )
    'There is no wealth but life itself.'

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    We have one of these + oil fired central heating too.
    >> http://www.stovessouthwest.co.uk/stove_A.html

    We run it on wood we just open the doors and let the heat go though the whole house,if take the fancy bit off the top and there is a hotplate underneath..

    MickT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silvergirl View Post
    We have a Jotul wood burning stove compleate with traditional scandinavian blessing on the side.

    Like the one in this link. http://www.jotuluk.com/content/produ...e____3645.aspx

    It is very efficent and has a very high capacity. Unfortunatly it doesn't have a back boiler for water and we do have oil fired heating as well, but this will heat the whole house on its own when it going. We have a few power cuts out here and I've cooked plenty meals on and in it even though thats not really what it was designed for.

    Our neighbours have one Identical but it had been used with coal and it developed a huge crack down the side. They still use it, one of these days I'm sure their house will burn down.

    Ours came with the house which is lucky as we could buy another three canoes with what it would cost.

    Hmmm. There's an Idea .
    ( only joking I really like this stove )
    ( I like canoes more though )
    The Jotul stoves were real popular around here in the 1970s, but I haven't seen much of them in recent years. I always wanted one, but could never justify the cost. Beautiful stoves!

    Burning coal is a "whole nother animal." If your stove is not made for it. Cracks are bound to appear. Seems like that would negate the air-tight factor for the Jotul. We have an old coal stove from the 1930s out in the bunk house. It is an upright affair, and can only take short pieces of wood. I save my coal for blacksmithing.

    Our main heating is off-peak electric. We have three electric heaters which are powered between 2300 and 0700. The electric elemement heats up taconite bricks in the heater which give off heat during the day. We also have a heated basement floor. As it is off-peak, we are able to purchase the electricity for $.02 a kilowatt hour (which is very cheap). the wood stove is back up, and will only heat the basement comfortably. We do have ice storms which knock out the power once in a while. We've only been without power for one long stretch (just over a week). Most often the power is out for a few hours. During the long stretch, we moved out to the bunkhouse - which is easily heated by wood. We still had to keep the wood stove going in the house though - to keep the water pipes from freezing.

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    "We have it in the basement for backup when the temps get in the minus 30 range"

    When I was a lad we we had it tough, we used to dream of it being minus thirty. You knew it was cold when your tongue stuck to the road when you were licking it for breakfast.

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    I use a woodburner too - mine is just a kinda basic firebox, but does a great job. No backboiler, as I too use gas for the rad's but that's just me being slack as much as anything. I'll drop one in when I augment the gas boiler with a solar water heating system in a year or so.

    Flat topped, so you can cook on it, which works ok, but then it's only a big metal plate that gets hot, so hard to imagine why it wouldn't I guess ...

    Last year 99% of the wood was Larch, as offcuts from a local roofing job, it was great, I just emptied the skip for a couple of weeks and that was enough for the whole winter. I'll always scavenge 'waste' timber from skips first, the amount of wood-as-fuel that goes in landfills is another thing that strikes me as insane.

    I only burn wood, it will take coal, but yuk - what a horrid fuel coal is to use, plus you can't beat the smell of wood as you walk back home. I don't like the smell of coal, reminds me of being a small lad and visiting various cities to see relatives, wood smells like the countryside. In my world of course, city=bad, countryside=good ...

    I'll be servicing mine in a bit, ready for the coming weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bothyman View Post
    We have one of these + oil fired central heating too.
    >> http://www.stovessouthwest.co.uk/stove_A.html
    Ah, that may turn out to be a very useful link for spares, thanks for that (as they are only about 20 minutes drive from me).

    20 minutes in the other direction, (ok, maybe 30) are these people too. No connection etc, but they have some interesting looking stuff there in their antique stove gallery. I don't know that I actually like much of it, but that certainly doesn't stop it being interesting. They've been in there 30 years too, which is great for a small local business. This is from a blacksmith in the same hamlet, which I think I do like.

    Pretty little hamlet too, with strong archaeology showing continuous occupation going back a long ole' way.

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    we got a Charnwood like this:

    http://www.chaseheating.co.uk/country6.html


    if you fully fire it up the chimney gets too hot to touch

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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork View Post
    Last year 99% of the wood was Larch, as offcuts from a local roofing job, it was great, I just emptied the skip for a couple of weeks and that was enough for the whole winter. I'll always scavenge 'waste' timber from skips first, the amount of wood-as-fuel that goes in landfills is another thing that strikes me as insane.

    I only burn wood, it will take coal, but yuk - what a horrid fuel coal is to use, plus you can't beat the smell of wood as you walk back home. I don't like the smell of coal, reminds me of being a small lad and visiting various cities to see relatives, wood smells like the countryside. In my world of course, city=bad, countryside=good ...

    I'll be servicing mine in a bit, ready for the coming weeks.
    If you are burning larch (which is, I believe what we refer to as hackamatack or tamarack) - it is a good thing your stove is rated for coal. Larch burns much like coal - very hot, and will burn out a wood stove that isn't rated for coal - in short order.

    PG

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Do you build peat sheds or turf sheds to keep it dry? I can't imagine soggy peat burning too well. Is there a special process for separating out the iron age sacrifice victims as well?
    the stacking is really important to allow rain to run off, so no shed or shelter required, the iron age sacrifice victims are normall made into soup at the peatbank (where you cut the peats) its a welcome bit of bounty from the earth goddess and its hard work that peatcutting

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    If you are burning larch (which is, I believe what we refer to as hackamatack or tamarack) - it is a good thing your stove is rated for coal. Larch burns much like coal - very hot, and will burn out a wood stove that isn't rated for coal - in short order.

    PG
    reminds me of when I used to live in orkney - we used to dive for coal off of the sunken boats in scapa flow (world war I ones not the later ones). the quality of the coal they were using then was MUCH higher than what you'd get for domestic use nowadays, one big limp would burn all night and if you didnt water it down with some puny modern stuff it'd burn right through your grate - great

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquanaut View Post
    reminds me of when I used to live in orkney - we used to dive for coal off of the sunken boats in scapa flow (world war I ones not the later ones). the quality of the coal they were using then was MUCH higher than what you'd get for domestic use nowadays, one big limp would burn all night and if you didnt water it down with some puny modern stuff it'd burn right through your grate - great
    I have this problem getting decent coal for blacksmithing. It certainly isn't available like it was even 20 years ago. I tried picking up some coal near the old coal docks in the town where I work. They sure didn't use very good coal for the old ore carriers - mostly sulfur. Of course I'm sure power wasn't the necessity it would have been with a war ship.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquanaut View Post
    the iron age sacrifice victims are normally made into soup at the peat bank (where you cut the peats) its a welcome bit of bounty from the earth goddess and its hard work that peat cutting
    I will never look at my peaty whiskeys the same ever again now.

    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    I have this problem getting decent coal for blacksmithing.
    We have the same problem here. We can get lots of local coal cheap here from Nova Scotia and areas of New Brunswick ($15 will fill your pickup) but the good stuff for smithing we have to order in from somewhere in Pennsylvania; they probably get it from Virginia.

    For quick projects like making horseshoes or adding tungsten carbide crystals to winter horseshoes The propane forge is the way to go. It is no good for blades and tools though. Where coal or charcoal adds carbon to the steel, a propane forge actually takes it away limiting its uses.
    Lloyd

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