Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Hi!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    30

    Default Hi!

    Hi!

    Just a few words to introduce myself...
    I'm a 20 year old Student at Exxeter, and at the moment i'm building a cedar strip-planked Kipawa - 16'6"...
    I've done a bit of canoeing before, but mainly rowing and sailing... looking forward to giving it a go!

    Anyway, bye for now

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    17,172

    Default

    Welcome

    You must post pictures of the canoe when it is finished. You can even do a thread describing the process, if you are feeling up to it
    John

  3. #3

    Default

    It's good to see there is someone else out there who appreciates the qualities of a real wood canoe, I was begining to think that everyone was happy to jump into a plastic boat.

    I too have just started on a cedar stripper, but of my own design, also 16' 6" long.

    I'll be interested to hear how get on .

    Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    17,172

    Default

    I would love to have a wooden boat but I would be so scared of damaging it I fear it would never get used.
    John

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Steve - what stage are you at? I've done about 75% of the planking of mine, but now that i;m back at uni it'll be a while before I can do much more!

    Now here's a question - what would anyone think having a wooden canoe would limit you to - i've not done much canoeing but I presume that whitewater is pretty much out of the question - anyone got any ideas?

  6. #6

    Default

    Kipawa - only just starting fabrication, spent quite a bit of time tweaking the design until I was happy with it, basically just cutting out my station molds at the moment, although have also been making paddles as well.

    Kipawa & Magikelly, from my research into woodstrip canoes well known manufacturers claim overall they are just as strong as many other manufactured methods of construction, I have read reports of these canoes being catapulted off the tops of cars due to insecure tie-down
    and an incident whereby a packing case containing a canoe was crushed by heavy machinery, and yet the canoes suffered only superficial damage.

    There are tried and tested designs out there for full on white water canoes. If you are concerned about durability with regard to rocks you can always modify your construction by using a heavier weight glass fibre fabric, or adding an additional layer of fabric in vunerable areas such as the keel-line. You can also use Kevlar as an alternative, some liken this to armour plating your canoe, OK I suppose if you like to spend your day bouncing off rocks. There are quite a range of products out there as alternatives to woven glass fibre but this is generally accepted as the norm, "you pays your money you takes your choice", as usual there are pro's and con's with any choice.

    Although your pride and joy may be susceptable to scratches and scrapes, they are relatively easy to repair.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NW Wales
    Posts
    1,303

    Default

    if you want good impact resistance, then wood fulfils that role very well. My cousin is a yacht designer and likes using epoxy skinned cedar strip because of it's strength to weight ratio, coupled with it's cost, versatility and looks especially with one offs.
    Obscured by Clouds

    Clipper Prospector 16

    http://lostcoast.blogspot.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •