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Thread: Inflatables - Discontinued / Others

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    260

    Default Inflatables - Discontinued / Others

    Please add any reviews for older (or brand new) models not covered elsewhere for this manufacturer.

  2. #2

    Thumbs up solar2

    hi the gumotex solar 2 , is great with the tracking fin on straight as ,1 person no probs from back seat. last made in 2007 ,made of hyplon
    good inflateable tad pricie
    brookbankcanes

  3. #3

    Default Sea Eagle

    Hi there,
    On my first post it would like it to be understood that I have been trekking for many years but I am very new to canoeing and as such should be treated with the relevant pity.
    I recently bought a Sea Eagle canoe and this thread seems to be the one to mention it in. (I dont have the storage space for a hard case (as much as I want one-and I really want one) and I dont have the money for a folding canoe.) Me and my son have been out in it a couple of times in earnest, once on Loch Awe and another time on my local river. I bought this as a cheap stop-gap till my advanced elements convertible arrived from America and so far it has been really impressive. It has two skegs which really helps me try to keep it on the straight, there is a fair amount of storage space (plenty of room for the two man tent, sleeping bags, stove, food, water, etc), it is very comfortable. It goes up easy and deflates in a matter of seconds. I have bumped into some 'hazards'-sharp pointy ones-and not a mark! I am looking forward to my advanced elements but I am having a lot of fun with the Sea Eagle canoe, as did my skeptical brothers on a recent paddle on the Clyde. They enjoyed it so much they want to do a tour of a loch or two, taking the camping gear and making a very long weekend of it. The advanced elements will be here by the weekend, and I will be heading out a day or two after it arrives. I will post a report on how it goes.

  4. #4

    Default Sevylor SVX200 look-a-like

    Hi all,
    I've just ordered myself an inflatable that looks like this:


    A Sevylor SVX200. But it's not a Sevylor, it's just based on the same design I believe.

    Here's what I'm actually getting though:




    It's called a Wildworld 100.






    Apparently, the person above weighs about 17 stone and there doesn't appear to be any sagging or anything in the midde so I'm quite hopeful.




    So that's what I'm waiting on for delivery! I'm really excited and can't wait to try it out!

    I'll report here after to let you know how it goes.

  5. #5

    Default Wildworld 100 K2 explorer

    Hi

    I've got one of these boats and been using it (on and off) for around 6 months now.

    The quality of construction is very good (similar to Gumotex boats) but uses inner tubes inside the tough outer material.

    I think they are more kayak than canoe in many ways and you backside certainly gets a good soaking when you're sat paddling! I fancied trying to makes seats to paddle it more canoe style (single blade kneeling) but the pressure seems to low to support the weight across the outer chambers.

    You can paddle it single blade sat down ok with two paddlers, but you'd need shortish paddles due to being low down.

    I'm toying with the idea of upgrading to a Gumotex Palava cause I want to get more into the single blade paddling and their seat/thwart based design seems a big step forward. Plus the Wildworld is a bit lacking in space for gear when theres two paddlers.

  6. #6

    Default helloo inflatable bro

    i just bought a stearns spree 2
    the best thing i ever did,now with four trips under my belt,
    i nearly bought the very one you are waiting on from ebay,but found a shop 2mins from my house with a spree 2, so went for that
    although i would like to know how your one handles
    if you could post results thx

    enjoy
    preparation is everything--oh dear,where,s the

  7. #7

    Default

    Well I took them out today for their maiden voyage. We went to Cuckmere Haven.

    I only took my phone with me as I've only got 1 waterproof bag and it's only big enough for a couple of phones and my car keys. So the quality of the pics isn't great. It was sunny, honest! But the pics make it look like it's grey and gloomy.



    The boats seem like a solid construction, hopefully they'll last us a long time. I didn't put any of the fins on as I'd read about this place being only 2 or 3 cm deep in places, but they still seem to track pretty straight.

    We took the dog as well, who kept jumping out and swimming to the other boat. She hasn't punctured it yet, and she's not the smallest of dogs.



    The paddles, although they work, are not the best things in the world. The actual blade seems quite small and so not very efficient.

    I have GPS on my phone and I tracked our movements to get an idea of how far we went and the speeds I achieved. The average speed was around 2-3 mph, and this was really gentle paddling. When I gave it some I reached a top speed of 6mph!

    We only paddled 1.5 miles as there's not much further we could have gone on that bit of water, lol, and I only had enough change to pay for 2 hours at the pay and display car park.



    There wasn't really any sagging, but as in this pic you could see that I was down in the water more than the front of the boat (I only noticed this when I saw the pics). Next time I'm going to sit forward a lot more.

    It's very stable, I could sit in it and paddle like a kayak. And I could sit/stand on my knees and paddle like a canadian canoe. I could even stand up without falling in or wobbling it too much.



    Overall, very pleased with them We're going to buy some decent paddles though. Also, I want to buy a pressure guage as I'm scared of blowing it up too much (limit is 1.7 psi!)

  8. #8

    Default Pathfinder

    The Pathfinder inflatable kayak is manufactured by a company called Jilang in China. It appears to be available in America from Walmart. In the UK it is available from Inflataboat, Supertramp and occasionally from ebay.

    I bought 2 Single kayaks for my wife and daughter, while I have a Sevylor Colorado. We have had rigid kayaks in the past (not recently), though authority is not implied. However, I can make comparison with the Colorado's construction.

    What you need to know:

    * Inflated size 300*90cm.
    * 2 tracking fins
    * Triple laminated material with a 500 denier material resistant to oil etc.
    * 3 air chambers. Two side chambers (inflated to 0.15 bar, 2.17psi) and an inflatable floor chamber (inflated to 0.1bar, 1.45psi)
    * I-beam inflatable floor with drain plug
    * removable fabric seat with pouch on back
    * adjustable foot rest
    * Weight 14kg
    * Maximum single user weight - 105kg

    First, the Boston valve is of plastic construction and an included adapter opens the valve when in place. This makes the use of a Stirrup pump on the side chambers with integral pressure gauge a useful accessory, though not necessary. Because the Kayak does not have separate internal bladders, a gauge is printed on the chambers inside wall. In the box is included an acetate ruler so that when inflated to the correct pressure the marks on the chamber should be 10 cm apart. This is a very accurate and convenient method of inflation, though the bottom chamber is left to best guess not having a similar arrangement.

    The floor chamber has a beach ball type valve on it. When compared to that on the Colorado, the valves larger with a wider neck. Comparatively this allows both quicker inflation and deflation of the chamber than the sevylor product. This type valve is adequate to the propose though it would be nice to have had a 3rd Boston valve. But I fear this is a common design on IK's.

    My wife and daughter consider the seats to offer a good amount of support for the back that is comparable, if not better than, those on the Colorado.

    Despite having two fins on the bottom of the boat there is a degree of rocking from side to side as the boat is paddled in earnest. Though with a maintenance stroke (i.e. to maintain speed) this is minimal and not a problem. We have thus far used the boat twice on a canal, and the boats are light enough to be lifted out of the canal and portaged around locks by a petite 14 year old girl. The surface of the boat has not suffered more than dirt on it where it has been hauled out around the concrete edges.

    For us these boats represent significant value for money. My wife and daughter are very satisfied with the boats and would be happy to go on the Thames and The Norfolk Broads, and I would be happy to let them albeit not alone.

    The kit comes with a bag, foot pump and various attachments, a very compact (if barely adequate) 5 part paddle, acetate pressure gauge (as discussed above), seat with detachable pockets, and footrest.

    For the money this is a very good boat. I certainly would not say don't bother purchasing a more expensive boat, but as a tentative step into kayaking it is eminently stable and appear quite resilient to the day to day knock it is likely to receive in any use short of white water. Even then, you would have to seek the opinion of someone who does white water kayaking But this a well thought out copy of sevylors SVX100 and moves with great ease through the water.

  9. #9

    Default Wildwater 100

    Hi another newby.
    Got one of these and went out on a very calm sea last Saturday for first paddle, the two of us. Using single paddles no skegs fitted mastered going in circles immediately!

    The outfit comes without a pressure gauge. Does anyone know/recommend/where to buy a gauge? Tried to hunt down a Sevylor gauge no luck!

  10. #10

    Default Wildworld 100

    Hi

    Yes I managed to get a gauge that fits off the stearns inflatables website (forget the address) but I think its tied to the site that sell the advanced elements boats as well

    Cheers

    Howard

  11. #11

    Default Pressure gauge

    http://www.stearns-inflatables.co.uk...pressure-gauge

    I don't know how good this is as the gauge that comes with the sevylor has a point on it that opens the valves after you have inflated it and gives a true and accurate reading. The Stirrup pump I own has the guage built in and does not give an accurate reading.

    If you have the pathfinder look in the repair bag, the acetate rule or gauge was in there.

    Mark

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MadStu View Post

    Photoshop FAIL!

  13. #13

    Default Sevylor Canyon

    Any chance of a Sevylor Canyon review thread? It looks to be gaining popularity as an alternative to the Backcountry.

  14. #14

    Default Wildworld 100

    Hi,
    Pressure Gauge.
    I solved my problem by buying a Bravo with pressure gauge in the handle.

    Web Sites
    Please check out these two web sites, full of information about inflatables.
    www.inflatablekayakworld.com and www.topkayaker.net

    Selling
    We have decided to sell our boat,although it is a fine boat, we only bought it for a try out. We have decided kayaking is for us so we are moving to get something of a different style but still inflatable.

    If anybody is interested in buying please keep an eye on eBay to pick up a bargain.
    I shall be posting the boat over the weekend.

  15. #15

    Default Arrivederci

    I have tried to post images and a review of my advanced elements convertible but it seems I am not allowed to (a pity, the pictures were fantastic). It seems you need 2 posts. Fair enough. Arrivederci.

  16. #16

    Default Sevylor Reviews

    For anyone interested, youcan find reviews of Sevylor inflatable at this site: http://www.allinflatableboats.net/se...ble-boats.html

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Milton Keynes The Universe
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MadStu View Post
    Also, I want to buy a pressure guage as I'm scared of blowing it up too much (limit is 1.7 psi!)
    I bought my Walker Bay Airis Inflatable on a bit of an impulse, without having done much research. I liked its 'dropstitch' construction, and I liked its looks. Maximum psi is 6.5, and it has no structural framework bits to keep it in shape.

    But the pictures and many favourable comments on this site seem to show most inflatables with very good stiffness (albeit a fairly 'bulbous' profile).

    Do most inflatables require a metal frame of some kind? If I supported my Airis on a trestle at each end, I reckon it would support a 7-8 stone person standing amidships without any sign of impending distortion.

    DD
    Last edited by duckdown; 3rd-January-2010 at 04:20 PM.

  18. #18

    Default

    Hi Guys, I see some of you have the Wildworld K2 explorer - Has anyone got a Sevylor RIO as well?

    I am trying to decide between the two and just can't!!

    I will be using it on rivers and in a protected bay with small waves.

    Any advice would be appreciated,

    Thanks

  19. #19

    Default

    Hi parrot girl,

    We have the Pathfinder (A sevylor sv100 clone ,the Wildwater is a an SV200 clone) and also the Sevylor Colorado (the two man version on the Rio), if you want to go expedition the outer coating of the Colorado is much more resilient. The boston valve in the side side cambers are smaller than the Pathfinder and are a bottleneck for both inflation and deflation of the Boat. This highly resilient material also takes alot longer than the Pathfinder to dry out thoroughly. The pathfinders chambers are not in an outer envelope like the Sevylor, but are resilient enough for casual paddlers and have survived several scuffs by over excited children against the concrete sides of a canal., don't go looking for branches to try it out on though. The Colorado tracks better, but is not as streamlined for slow moving water, so is harder work on a longer paddle. The Wildwater you talk of is of inflations chambers in a Reinforced PVC outer so might be a good compromise. Though I am happy with the Pathfinders as the are very Lightweight, with good large boston valves and are more than adequate for my familys needs.

    At the moment we have used the them five or six times each, and for my so far ocassional purposes, the Pathfinders so far have my favour. THe colorado is likely to last longer, but is heavy to carry and a pain to transport because of the amount of water that can drain in the boot of my car (I have not been out in it in enough sun to remotely dry it out). In contrast the pathfinders can be towel-dried very quickly and left overnight in the garage and it is ready for storage.
    Last edited by Mark01494; 6th-February-2010 at 02:56 PM. Reason: Further Information

  20. #20

    Default Wildwater vs Rio

    I don't personally own a Rio (or colorado) but I have inspected them in good detail in a shop. I have a Wildwater and a Gumotex Palava. Both of these boats have outer skins made of hyperlon type material which is a sandwich of tough fabric and rubberised material. In my opinion this material is far superior to the PVC bladder construction employed in the Rio/Colorado construction. It is also very easy to clean and tough.

    The inner floor material of the Wildwater is not quite as strong as the outer ribs and underside but is perfectly adequate. Its design is primarily as a kayak and best paddled with a kayak paddle. The fins which attach to underside produce good tracking for the shape of boat and it can easily be paddled with kayak paddles by one or two people.

    I discounted the Rio on the the basis it was a rather oddly shaped single person only kayak.

    The retailer where I inspected the Sevylor boats told me he sells loads of them to people who no very little about them and like all the bells and whistles they have. But in his opinion the Gumotex boats are the best inflatable within the sensible price range and I initially ended up buying the Wildwater on the basis it was of a similar quality to the Gumotex. However, I decided I'd rather have a canoe styled boat too, so ended up splashing out on the Gumotex Palava!! My wife doesn't understand though

  21. #21

    Default Hi all,

    Thanks for the info!

    I think I will go ahead and buy the Wildworld one from Ebay

    It may not last as long but hopefully it will go faster than the Rio.

  22. #22

    Post Anyone knows anything about the "new" Sevylor Canyon?

    Hi everyone! This is my first day in the SOTP forum (and of course my first post)! I 'm really happy to be among you nice paddling people!

    I 'm looking for some info i can't seem to find anywhere on the web right now.
    Can anyone positively direct me as to what is going on with the Sevylor Canyon ?
    I understand it did have some major problems mainly caused by leaking seams, due to poor construction quality. Right now, it seems it:

    a) has been withdrawn and not being sold anymore from some serious websites
    b) is being sold at the same time by the dozens on ebay (possibly the older 2009 model?)
    c) is announced as ''new 2010 model" or "Sevylor Canyon 2" expected in April in some major websites, but either they don't have it yet, or it's not clear if it's a new model at all..

    What I want to know is if there is actually a "new 2010 model", and if so, is it improved in the critical issue of leaking seams? Also does it look like all the pictures of the Canyon show it to be or is it changed in appearance too? You know, there are hundreds of pictures in the internet, depicting a blue Canyon with a black strip on top of the side chambers, where your elbows are to rest, plus just ONE pic of it supposedly showing the new 2010 model, depicting it as colored a lighter blue,and with a white strip instead, and perhaps a few details different. I wonder if anyone has actually seen it.. and what could be the actual differences between the old and new model?

    I 'm ready to buy an inflatable, and i 'm inclined either to the Sevylor Canyon or the Stearns Back Country (the latter also having the same reputation of seams leaking, ever since both Sevylor and Stearns were bought by Coleman)

    If anyone has any knowledge or, even better, personal experience, please enlighten me!

    P.S. Please don't propose me buying the Colorado instead, it seems to be out of question due to budget restrictions!
    Last edited by user789; 28th-April-2010 at 08:35 PM.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crawley Sussex
    Posts
    469

    Default Sea Eagle

    just thought I would post a photo of a Sea Eagle next to Mal Grey's Colorado for comparison

    I dont believe in Reincarnation, I didn't believe it when I was an Aardvark, and I dont believe it now!

  24. #24

    Default Sea Eagle deluxe seat

    Hi

    Just wondered how you find the deluxe sea eagle seat? I quite fancy trying one in my K2 explorer (see above in the same thread). The seats are a bit lacking in this boat and your behind ends up sat in a puddle!

    Is the backrest supported by a strap connecting to the base of the seat (not that clear in sea eagle instructions)?

    Cheers
    Howard

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crawley Sussex
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by culleyh View Post
    Hi

    Just wondered how you find the deluxe sea eagle seat? I quite fancy trying one in my K2 explorer (see above in the same thread). The seats are a bit lacking in this boat and your behind ends up sat in a puddle!

    Is the backrest supported by a strap connecting to the base of the seat (not that clear in sea eagle instructions)?

    Cheers
    Howard
    The Sea Eagle seat is supported by the straps, although it is probably firm enough not to need them! the seat just sits on the floor of the boat, and the sides of the boat are what holds it in place. I was out on the sea today, and as part of the boat reviews on this thread, I have to mention that the Sea Eagle is quite tippy on medium swell, as the bottom of the boat is quite narrow, but the secondary stability is good after the first 10 degrees of leaning, it just feels horrible until you eventually get used to it. other than that, it's really good. Will try it next with the floor deflated to see if that improves things. The seat itself is very comfortable, and about 4 inches thick at the base, so you would have to go some to end up sitting in a puddle. Hope this helps.
    I dont believe in Reincarnation, I didn't believe it when I was an Aardvark, and I dont believe it now!

  26. #26

    Default How does the Sea Eagle compare to the Sevylor Rio ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie KMQ View Post
    The Sea Eagle seat is supported by the straps, although it is probably firm enough not to need them! the seat just sits on the floor of the boat, and the sides of the boat are what holds it in place. I was out on the sea today, and as part of the boat reviews on this thread, I have to mention that the Sea Eagle is quite tippy on medium swell, as the bottom of the boat is quite narrow, but the secondary stability is good after the first 10 degrees of leaning, it just feels horrible until you eventually get used to it. other than that, it's really good. Will try it next with the floor deflated to see if that improves things. The seat itself is very comfortable, and about 4 inches thick at the base, so you would have to go some to end up sitting in a puddle. Hope this helps.
    Is it possible to use a single paddle with this boat ?

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crawley Sussex
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ceekay View Post
    Is it possible to use a single paddle with this boat ?
    Not sure - would be pretty awkward, as the boat is quite wide.
    I dont believe in Reincarnation, I didn't believe it when I was an Aardvark, and I dont believe it now!

  28. #28

    Default

    Cheers for that, I think I'll give one a try as they certainly look better than any other seats I've seen.

    Its interesting that you're considering deflating the floor for sea usage! Mine sprung a leak in the floor whilst out on a lake recently and I was surprised how stable it felt when the wind got up and you got some bigger waves.

    Inflatables are great, they should be re-badged "Adjustable Canoes"

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Titchfield Hampshire
    Posts
    443

    Default Sea Eagle proud owner

    Hi

    I have had a Sea Eagle for about five years, and have used it on rivers and the solent, and even took it to Spain one year on the plane. In Spain it provided hours of fun in the med for the small cost of £30.
    The way it packs down is great, just chuck it in the boot.

    The best way to overcome that tippy feeling is to slide your feet under the side tubes provides all the stabiltiy you need. Just make sure you face into the waves and you'll be fine. If you can afford a few more quid I would buy one of the upgraded models. No need to import from the states they have suppliers in UK.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Peterborough
    Posts
    110

    Default Sevylor Tahiti 2+1 (K109 HF)

    I have recently bought 2 of these as a low cost way to get myself, the wife and our 2 lads onto the water. We are pretty much novice paddlers.

    Inflation
    The boats are very easy and quick to inflate. About 15 minutes each so far and we've only done it 3 times. The built in pressure indicator works well and we found the boats rigid enough and buoyant enough without needing to make adjustments.

    Seating and luggage space
    The inflatable seats concerned me as I couldn't imagine them supporting our weight. Well, they do a fantastic job and I'd go as far as to say that I was quite comfortable sitting on mine. The kids were also comfortable and they tried the smaller, built-in, seats too and seemed happy enough. Perhaps the only complaint here is that we did have trouble with leg room when using 2 adults and 1 child in a boat, but the 2 larger seats are not fixed in place so with some experimentation I think we'd improve that. Certainly with 1 adult and 1 child it would be easy to get plenty of leg room each, and I dare say we'd have room left for a picnic, a pump and a few other bits 'n' pieces for a trip. We're hoping to get a couple of tents and camping kit for the four of us in them at some point and I think we'll do it easily.

    On the water
    We've only launced each boat once. We found a nice bit of river bank that was easy to step down into the water at, and where the water was shallow. I helped the others step into the boats but I decided just to get my feet wet rather than try to leap in. Bit of practise and we'll be fine.

    There was a slight breeze and the river was flowing slowly so it should have been easy enough to manouevre. I managed to get my boat moving well although the wind and current were making life slightly awkward. My wife had a harder time as she needed time to think about how to paddle, only to find herself blown into a different predicament. 15 minutes of circles was followed by 10 minutes of side-to-side collisions with the legs of a stone bridge. Finally, she got the hang of it and then sped off into the distance. Once we were moving it was quite easy to go straight into the wind and flow. NOTE: we haven't got the optional skegs fitted to ours - we decided to try them without first.

    Paddling with the current and with the wind we found the boats liked to turn. This may be because the current was pushing us faster than we could paddle, causing the stern to try and overtake. We did have 2 adults + 1 child in each boat at this point though.

    Stability
    Superb. There's no chance of capsizing one of these unless you hit whitewater. Even then it'd take some. The only way you'd fall out is if you lean out to far but the seating position makes that difficult to do by accident.

    Paddles
    For paddles we're using one Sevylor K-PERF230 per boat. For me it felt a bit short as the large sides of the boat obstruct your hands. My wife thought it was too long! I guess it's a case of adjusting. Once we got the hang of it we both found it easy enough going. The boats move nicely through the water and they look smart and "authentic" considering they are a relatively cheap product.


    One final point....do try and remember to close the drain before you put the boat in the water! Having said that, we didn't take any water on with the drain left open as it sits a few inches above the water line. Neat design or luck? Who cares?

  31. #31

    Default Sevylor Yukon

    Hi All,

    There seems to be a common theme of recent posts reporting tales of new boats, so heres another one. Thought it might be useful to someone as hadnt seen any reviews of the Yukon on the web so far.

    Had been looking for a few weeks and much appreciated reading the info on here and seeing some great pictures of various adventures. I used to do WW kayaking at college, but was after a boat to share with the misses. Portability meant an inflateable. Really liked the practicality of the Yukon and seemed more streamlined than some of the other models but still hopefully as rugged.

    Ordered from Ashbys (where Mark offered great advice and obviously new his stuff). No connection at all. Delivered in 2 days in time for last weekend. Bought the Combi 215 so that we could test out both the canoe paddles and the kayak option. Both worked really well, though a 230 would be more suitable and I had to slightly restrain my kayak paddle motion to avoid clouting my passenger over the head.

    Boat uses 3 different type valves, and very quick to inflate with a 2L hand pump. Real pain to try and get accurate pressure measurements. Think I'll stick with the pretty firm but not rock hard setting in future as I only let loads of air out when trying to get a measurement (and be careful on sunny stops).

    Forget to fit the included skeg before inflating (impossible after) so didnt use it on our first river trip up the Hamble from Bursledon. Wasnt really an issue as the boat tracked pretty well though it might have saved me a little wasted energy on the J stroke. Even with the gauge faffing, boat was ready in 15mins and we had a great trip up to Botley, stopping for some late lunch en route. The 70L water resistant holdall easily accommodated the pump, cool bag, blanket and extra clothes.

    We obviously didnt have a leisurely enough lunch as the tide wasnt yet helping on the way back, and was pretty hard work on one section directly into F4 westerly.

    All in all it was a great 5 hours out on the water, and look forward to exploring more of the Southern waterways. If anyone wants to know more about the Yukon, just shout. Looking forward to some summer trips to Tarn, Bombannes and Coniston this summer.

    Sam

  32. #32

    Default Pathfinder inflatable

    Hi folks.
    Been a member her for quite some time, but never posted, so here goes. I bought the pathfinder XXl tandem in spring 2007 and have never looked back. Its been the length of the river Wye twice, the Pembrokeshire coast this year in June, by coast I mean going down the coast and exploring the caves and inlets on the way. Its done the east coast around Scarborough and Whitby every year for two weeks since 2007, and will this year. It performs flawlessly, and tracks brilliantly with skegs fitted, rubbish without them. Takes scrapes and knocks with ease, only ever had one hole in the floor outer underneath, that was when a large wave carried me and my daughter onto a barnacle covered rocks of the east coast, this produced a hole about 5mm in diameter. But didn't go to the bladder which is behind this outer floor cover, what did happen was about two gallon of water was trapped between the two layers, and because the hole was more or less mid section we couldn't get it out, which in turn stopped us rolling the boat up, so I had to take a stanley knife to the cover to create a slit at one end, thus allowing the removal of the water. These boats take a lot more abuse than the Sevylors, are tougher and more stable. When I go camping with my son me in my pathfinder and him in his down the coast or rivers we take full camping gear for seven to ten days, i.e. tent, clothing, food water etc etc, all in three 45ltr dry bags, two behind and one in front. At around £150 including postage from ebay they are the best buy in inflatables.

  33. #33

    Default yukon

    hi sam.. was thinking of getting a sevylor yukon for a trip to loch shiel in scotland. do you think it would be suitable for two fellas me 14 stone and bruv 17 .. both approx 6 feet tall , the loch can be a bit choppy sometimes and we will have a fair bit of luggage, tents, food, cooking stuff ,,enough for about 3 to 4 days wild camping.. any more info on your yukon would be great.. thanks.. bob

  34. #34

    Default

    Hi bobster,

    Sorry for the delay - been on Hols!

    You guys are a bit heavier than me and the misses (19 stone total). The boat says it can take 250Kg, but the boat would sit a little lower with a bit more drag. Its got a reasonable amount of storage and further luggage could be strapped on/under legs etc.

    Stability wise it wouldnt be a concern. And it seems pretty durable too, it stood up pretty well to a shallow Tarn this summer and a few rock collisions. All in all, Im well happy with it and will provide many more interesting excursions amongst our rivers and canals.

    Let me know if youve any more questions,

  35. #35

    Default Sevylor SVX500 / XK17 (2002/3) vs ?

    We've just had our Sevylor Ocean SVX500 / XK17 (2002 model in Grey - with optional rudder etc) stolen (Loughton in Essex if you happen to find it at a car boot sale) and I'm pining for it, so thought I'd trawl around and rub salt into my own wounds...

    It was originally a very generous wedding present from a group of friends and the XK17 was superbly practical - we paddled it all over the UK, including the Orkneys, Hebrides, Highlands, Snowdonia, Ireland and lots of East Coast (Essex / Suffolk) plus lots of little trips around Cornwall and Dorset (eg Lulworth Cove to Durdle door round trips)

    It was incredibly stable, however at 16.5ft could be a little tricky to keep in a straight line in stronger winds - paddling in Torridon with the wind whistling down the mountain sides and across the lake got a bit tiring one mirning, so I added the optional rudder to help (a little hassle to set up, but worth it).

    I don't remember ever having to repair the (1000 denier) outer shell as it was certainly strong enough for rock bumping - indeed I spent a happy afternoon surfing it over a draining reef with another large friend (combined weight 33 stone).

    We occasionally used it with three people paddling (not quite enough room for 6 flailing arms) so total weight over 40 stone and no problems other than being lower in the water made steerage way and adjusting fore/aft weight distribution a bit more logistical.

    The supplied 2 part paddles (on the 2002/3 model anyway) were nothing special to write home about and the standard foot pump not fantastic quality, but both up to the job. The only real problem I had was valves - either losing the covers when the flaps broke off, or one which had wedged itself under the outer shell as things must have shifted around a bit relative to each other and was a bit of a pain every use to get access to correctly, no matter how hard I tried to rectify.

    On longer journeys I found the width of the canoe a little too much and often rubbed my hands on the pontoons as I paddled. The standard seats weren't perfect and it was often difficult to get comfortable (I'm 6'3").

    Unfortunately, it was uninsured so I'm now trying to decide what to replace it with. I still have a second hand light weight one seater (Tahiti) which I didn't use as the XK17 was always a better net and much much stronger material - the tahiti had a hole in it when I got it... but it'd otherwise be perfect for the kids on gentle river or beach.

    So as the kids are getting older, two adults and two children would have become a squeeze, even in the exceptionally capacious xk17, maybe it was fortuitous (I'm trying to be positive, OK). one option is probably to buy two smaller canoes and I wondered what people's opinion was of things like the 13ft pathfinder xxl I see on eBay? They seem to be 500 denier so I guess less tough than the Sevylor, but have the added advantage of being lighter to transport.

    Carting the heavy XK17 down a long cliff path was a real chore sometimes (i bought a folding sack truck to make it easier) up again is painful... So if you have experience of hauling something else around it would be appreciated.

    In all, it was a fantastic boat. I come from a rigid kayak background and I was overall very impresses with the SK17's versatility and practicaiity.

    So - what do we replace it with? Sea Eagle, another Sevylor, Stearns, Pathfinder? ... I'll probably look for 2 x small 2 man canoes (or 2 large one person canoes) so we can each get ourselves plus a primary school aged child in (remember I'm talk) ... Allowing for some growing room maybe!

    As you can expect as we were Uninsured I don't want the expense of another XK17 if at all possible...

    Thanks for any advice!
    Last edited by chops; 6th-February-2011 at 02:01 PM. Reason: Grammar, spelling and omissions

  36. #36

    Default

    I've just reread my XK17 post (which written on a phone, so please excuse my typos etc). I realised that, in trying to constructively criticise the model it may have come across as less positive than I intended. Don't get me wrong; I'd buy another one like a shot - we loved that canoe (boo hoo).

    the pic in the next post shows the Sevylor XK17 (oh, and a mate and me - having a quick explore on the norfolk broads a couple of years ago). I had to put the images in a new post because I'm still a new member and the system won't let me add images to my second post..

    Last edited by chops; 6th-February-2011 at 03:12 PM. Reason: can add image if I edit after posting!

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Catterick
    Posts
    309

    Default

    I can reccomend the Pathfinder XXL, it is a very tough boat, I have been over sharp rocks, mussel beds and even run over barbed wire, I bought mine of ebay and also one for a friend, the seller was the sportangel, she is very helpful and fast to dispatch.

    I had previously had two Sevylor canoes and find the Pathfinder better quality easier to steer and a lot faster, the valves are better and everything is included in the price.

    Oft him anhaga are gebideš, metudes miltse, žeah že he modcearig geond lagulade longe sceolde hreran mid hondum hrimcealde sę

  38. #38

    Default Sea Eagle Fast Track 385

    Used it a few times now mainly in the sea. It is pretty easy to blow up & takes about 10 minutes to get it ready. We opted for the pro version with the better seats & paddles. The seats hold you reasonably well, bit disappointed that the buckles seem to show some signs of corrosion even though we have always tried to make sure everything is as dry as possible. A couple of them came apart in use ut I have crimped them a bit tighter to solve the problem. The seats also have a removable bag & this has a metal ring in the bottom for draining any water & this is rusting not good.
    As to how it performs on the water we find it really easy to paddle (we are a couple of not too fit pensioners), the inflatable keel & skeg help to keep it going where you want. It isn't overly affected by wind & is probably no worse than any other type of boat paddling into or across the wind. In the sea if it's choppy you can get a fair bit of water coming over the top as it is quite low in the water. Only used it once on the river in & it moves nicely over the water with little effort. Tried using a couple of umbrellas to run downwind & found it goes really well with a tendency to try to turn upwind, encouraging enough to want me to make a sailing rig for it. I think with a 4 meter sail & some lee boards or outriggers would perform quite well.
    Ed

  39. Default

    Does anyone have any experience of the Z Pro Tango 2, which seems to blend the tough materials of the top Sea Eagles, with the pricing points of the Sevylors and cheaper Sea Eagles.


    Available in Blue, Red, or in Yellow in a 3 seater version. Can't post a link as it's my first post.

    The seat can be centre-mounted for solo paddling apparently.

    Anyone got one of these ?

  40. Default

    Post 2

  41. Default

    Ok here's the link for the Z-Pro Tango:

    http://www.bluewatersports.eu/zpro-t...ges-5977-p.asp

  42. #42

    Default

    Price looks reasonable but it seems that the tubes are covered in nylon material. My Sea Eagle is more like a rubberised type material similar to the zodiac type inflatables.
    Ed

  43. Default

    Lads
    I am looking for advice on these three all similary priced with the SE being the cheapest but not sure what the material is compared to the others, Thanks. IT will be the first time out and will be used in mainly lakes in Ireland.

    Zpro Tango 3man £375
    Sevylor Hudson 2+1 £395
    Sea Eagle SE 370 Pro £335

  44. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Manchester U.K
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Hi,
    I have a Hudson though I have no experience of the other to boats. The Hudson is a great load lugger and easy to paddle singly (double paddle) or with a buddy (single paddles) The only down side I can think of, having had mine for over a year and with a fair few miles of canal trips, is the drying time. It can be a pain to dry due to the nylon covering. I carry mine after trips on my van roof and with a good headwind it's bone dry and ready to pack away. It is extremely comfortable when on a lengthy trip. I find the back supports a little low but with the addition of folding seats it is just about perfect for my crumbly back http://www.flickr.com/photos/5191304...in/photostream
    You can see the boat here with the seats and 18st of brother add him to my 17st, along with all the bits and bobs needed for a day on the water and the weight soon adds up. The Hudson handles all this easily and with plenty of room for a couple of waifs like us.
    When paddling alone any side wind makes it a bit if a handful but I dare say that is the case in most inflatables. I find that the skeg is a must if paddling alone but only if you favour going in a straight line.
    The coated tarpaulin hull wears well and has stood up to a fair bit of abuse showing very little in the way of scratches. The upper nylon cover is a doddle to clean after even the most scummy canal soup.
    The bladders have retained shape and position within their covers and the valves, of the Boston type, are showing no sign of wear. The floor valve ,Beachball type, is a bit suspect in my opinion and should it ever give way will be replaced with a Boston valve .Having said that it is still like new and looks like it will last.
    I'd be only too happy to recommend the Hudson but having no experience of the others I'd take it with a pinch of salt.It is a risk and nearly £400 for an inflatable is no small amount to pay.I don't think you'd be disappointed with a Hudson though.

  45. Default

    Thanks for that detailed reply Woodist, i am thinking the hudson & Tango are similar in spec of material. Have come across some reviews of the higher end Sea Eagles but none on the one I have been looking at.

  46. #46

    Default

    Well heres a blast from the past

    The sevylor ranger has been relaunched and is ready to fill the gap left by the ill fated leaky canyon

    a favourite for trips, its ideal for 1 man and his gear. There are 2 seats but they only facilitate short trips or small paddlers

    http://www.solelymarine.com/sevylor-...back-161-p.asp

  47. #47

    Default zpro tango 300

    Hi
    I have a tango 300, Bought it from inflataboats for £386. inc pump. and 2 splitable kayak paddles. We have been out on it 3 times now on the glos canal and love it. Holds myself wife, 2 boys (2 and 3.5 Years old) and jack russel with room to spare. The seats are brilliant, fully adjustable any where within the canoe, and if you want to sit bolt upright or lean back. (look on zpro spares web site they have a high back seat for £60!). I plan to camp out in it, and use it to sleep on with a home made tarp tent cover.
    Nb. last time i used it i inflated to the recomended 100 psi it was very sunny and hot but after 1 hour the weather changed and it rained for 1/2 hour and got quite cold. The pressure dropped in the canoe and all 3 bladders were very soft. After pumping it back up it was fine again and held for the rest of the trip (2 hours). Just thinking if it was round the otherway ie cold when first pumped up then got sunny and hot, Tthere would be a real danger of over inflation. anyone know what would happen? POP? or dammage the stitching?

  48. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Devon ..just up from the bottom and right a bit.
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    Yes, Ive noticed the big pressure/temperature differences in my Gumotex inflatable. I would like to think it wouldnt go bang! Maybe just let a bit of air out when appropriate (bit of a pain). ..Ive had a real laugh in mine at about two thirds pressure in small surf..That aint much help to you, but good fun

  49. #49

    Default

    100 psi are you sure about that? a drop stitch floor may take 10psi at a push but the boat itself is likely to be less than 5, more likely 100mbar or around 3 psi for an inflatable
    Last edited by grestini; 12th-June-2011 at 05:20 PM. Reason: pressed return too early

  50. #50

    Post Zpro

    Hi paddledaddy,

    I have had a Zpro Tango about 3 weeks now and I am also really pleased with its performance, size and build quality. I did try using it without the skeg in windy conditions and it was really hard work, but with the skeg no problems, paddles very easily and I thought it was surprisingly manouverable. I got me and my 2 eldest kids in Ok but I found it a lot better with only 2 paddlers, I am over 6 foot and could put my legs out straight when in the back seat. When I bought mine I got a free sevylor pressure gauage. The pressure should not exceed 0.1bar or 1.45 psi and I think over inflation can result in stretching of the fabric covers. I have heard that the air in the ribs cool as the kayak is on the water and this can result in a loss of pressure but likewise in hot conditions it advises to let some air out.

    Thanks for the tip on the Zpro spares will deffinately check that out. Enjoy the paddling.

    Oddmanout.

  51. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Devon ..just up from the bottom and right a bit.
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    Memory jogged...my Gumotex has instructions to let air out in warming conditions. The 100 psi didnt sink in first time, but that would be a little????? EXPLOSIVE!!

  52. #52

    Default zpro inflation and cleaning

    Hi
    Yes quite right about the pressure. 100mbar or 1.45 psi (not 100psi as i posted b4!). I do have a pressure gauge so havent tried to pump up too much. Apparently you only take the skeg off for w/w.
    I have just finished cleaning it after a trip. I used 1/2 a washing tablet disolved in warm water and a soft nylon brush. This got the white trim cleanish. I rembered to put the valves back in to stop water from getting into the bladders, But there are 2 small round holes at the drain end so water filled between the bladder and green material. I think next time i will 3/4 inflate it to clean.
    I can imagine 3 paddlers would take a degree of Synchronization. I sometimes tap paddles with my wife (not a euphemism) and thats her with kayak style and me single. Get it right with 3 kayak style it would look amazing from the bank + you would motor along!

  53. #53

    Default

    Hi oddman

    What paddle do you use for stern or solo paddling. I have the cheap plastic/ally pole paddles it came with, but have ordered an ottertail from fenland paddles to try.

  54. #54

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by paddledaddy View Post
    Hi oddman

    What paddle do you use for stern or solo paddling. I have the cheap plastic/ally pole paddles it came with, but have ordered an ottertail from fenland paddles to try.
    Hi paddle,

    I too am currently using the standard issue kayak paddles. Very interested to hear how you get on with the new ottertail paddle, looks like a good buy! I have not done any solo paddling so can not comment on that either, but let me know how it goes with the new paddle - I must admit I do like the idea of the single paddles.

    Thanks.
    Oddmanout

    "Be yourself because everyone else is taken"

  55. #55

    Default New paddle

    Hi oddman,
    My new ceder ottertail arrived the other day. 1st thing i noticed was ITS SO LIGHT! i ordered it unvarnished as i wanted to oil it so 6 coats of danish later it weighs only 600g.
    The grain looks beautiful but being a ceder it is prone to small bruises where as a hard wood oak or ash would be tougher (although heavier).
    I havent seen any other wooden paddles in the flesh to compare it to but......
    Looking on the net wooden paddles seem to have a round shaft rounded grip and cambered blade. This is made from a flat timber 1" thick reduced to 15mm for the blade. The shaft is rectangle with the edges rounded off, smooth but feels a little awkward when paddling compared to the round ally pole.The blade is totaly flat across the face. Again rounded off at the edges but i think i will take a bit more off the edges to give it a soft curve over the face. I hope this will allow the water to slip off the blade and stop the slight feathering when pulling a strong stroke. All this said for the money (£50 delivered) its a massive step up from the ally and plastic job.
    While i was waiting for it to arrive i made a small paddle for my son from bits of pine i had lying around. Turned out ok and i learned alot. Its not as difficult as it looks. i will try to post some pics of both paddles soon.

  56. #56

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by paddledaddy View Post
    Hi oddman,
    My new ceder ottertail arrived the other day. 1st thing i noticed was ITS SO LIGHT! i ordered it unvarnished as i wanted to oil it so 6 coats of danish later it weighs only 600g.
    The grain looks beautiful but being a ceder it is prone to small bruises where as a hard wood oak or ash would be tougher (although heavier).
    I havent seen any other wooden paddles in the flesh to compare it to but......
    Looking on the net wooden paddles seem to have a round shaft rounded grip and cambered blade. This is made from a flat timber 1" thick reduced to 15mm for the blade. The shaft is rectangle with the edges rounded off, smooth but feels a little awkward when paddling compared to the round ally pole.The blade is totaly flat across the face. Again rounded off at the edges but i think i will take a bit more off the edges to give it a soft curve over the face. I hope this will allow the water to slip off the blade and stop the slight feathering when pulling a strong stroke. All this said for the money (£50 delivered) its a massive step up from the ally and plastic job.
    While i was waiting for it to arrive i made a small paddle for my son from bits of pine i had lying around. Turned out ok and i learned alot. Its not as difficult as it looks. i will try to post some pics of both paddles soon.
    Now then Paddle,

    The new ottertail sounds top draw. Really interested to hear how it is in the water and what benefits you find over the standard kayak paddles in the Zpro (aside from the lightness). I am starting to think about and plan some more "serious" paddles now with a bit of cooking/camping thrown in hopefully. Going to the Suffolk coast in 2 weeks for a bit of messing about in the sea as well.
    Oddmanout

    "Be yourself because everyone else is taken"

  57. #57

    Question Z-pro Tango 300

    Hi oddman,

    Just come back from a 2 day trip with my 3.5 year old son down/up the glos-sharpness canal.I used it to sleep in, just reduced the pressure. I tried the ottertail solo but found i was crabbing to the side (opposite to the side i was paddling). Kept the nose straight but would drift off to the side, most strange. This happened with plastic paddle as well and i was doing the j stroke! In the end i resorted to using the kayak paddles the whole trip. I do love using the otter in the rear if someone is up front.
    I have made a wooden seat that lashes to the d rings. This is a ply board (varnished)that sits "on top of the side tubes. (at the rear of he black pads, aprox 2 foot long and just wide enough so the paddle doesnt knock it) I find it gives me a higher seating position and i dont get "dead leg" after sitting flat for 5 min. I tried kneeling on the floor but this also hurts after a short time.
    Im also going to make a much larger (deeper) skeg out of wood or plastic. As the canal is 16' deep and pretty much still water i hope this will reduce the crabbing effect. God knows what it will look like after i have finished "customising" it. (still not thought of a way of adding a sail!!!).Also i bought a 2litre sylvdor pump (£12) ish as the one it came (£5ish) with started leeking at high pressure and took forever (7-10 min per tube) to inflate. Can do the whole inflate biz in less than 10 min now. Any thoughts on keeping her straight? probley my paddling tecnique or is that inflatables generaly.

  58. #58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paddledaddy View Post
    Hi oddman,<br>
    <br>
    Just come back from a 2 day trip with my 3.5 year old son down/up the glos-sharpness canal<img src="images/smilies/Smilie_tent.gif" alt="" title="Tent" smilieid="61" class="inlineimg" border="0"><img src="images/smilies/Campfire.gif" alt="" title="Campfire" smilieid="54" class="inlineimg" border="0">.I used it to sleep in, just reduced the pressure. I tried the ottertail solo but found i was crabbing to the side (opposite to the side i was paddling). Kept the nose straight but would drift off to the side, most strange. This happened with plastic paddle as well and i was doing the j stroke! In the end i resorted to using the kayak paddles the whole trip. I do love using the otter in the rear if someone is up front.<br>
    I have made a wooden seat that lashes to the d rings. This is a ply board (varnished)that sits "on top of the side tubes. (at the rear of he black pads, aprox 2 foot long and just wide enough so the paddle doesnt knock it) I find it gives me a higher seating position and i dont get "dead leg" after sitting flat for 5 min. I tried kneeling on the floor but this also hurts after a short time. <br>
    Im also going to make a much larger (deeper) skeg out of wood or plastic. As the canal is 16' deep and pretty much still water i hope this will reduce the crabbing effect. God knows what it will look like after i have finished "customising" it. (still not thought of a way of adding a sail!!!).Also i bought a 2litre sylvdor pump (£12) ish as the one it came (£5ish) with started leeking at high pressure and took forever (7-10 min per tube) to inflate. Can do the whole inflate biz in less than 10 min now. Any thoughts on keeping her straight? probley my paddling tecnique or is that inflatables generaly.
    <br><br>Hi paddle,<br><br>Sorry cannot help with the crabbing as I am still using the kayak paddles, maybe worth asking the wider forum for help? Your 2 day camping trip sounds spot on, did you use a tarp for cover and wasn't the inside of the kayak too wet for sleeping? What was the Zpro like for carrying your stuff? I really want to do a kayak/camp trip with my 13 year son, so I may need to pick your brains about suitable locations on the glos-sharpness canal soon. I did about 9 miles last Saturday, paddling almost solo down a stretch of the River Welland from Crowland to Spalding, my 8 year old daughter was in the front with a single paddle, but only dipped it in the water occasionally, describing herself as the "booster". I do find I tend to go a little right and need to correct by using a little stronger stroke on one side. I will post some pictures and a bit of a blog soon. I have just come back from a weekend in Lowestoft - surprised how decent the beach was! Decent pump is a must, I was provided with a Flexifoil aluminium pump (Kite boarding) when I bought my Zpro and it inflates the kayak so quick. The "pimped up" Zpro is sounding interesting - post some pictures if you can and let me know how the custom skeg goes.
    Oddmanout

    "Be yourself because everyone else is taken"

  59. #59

    Default Your thoughts/experience as sea eagle owner

    Hi
    Am new to the site - having spent many hours consulting/reading in run up to getting an inflatable kayak, finally joined.
    Should be grateful for your thoughts on your Sea Eagle and info on the sort of trips you've made in it, carrying capacity ease of inflation, deflation, cleaning, drying etc and just in general.
    Any info gratefully received - can't beat real life experience!
    Am thinking of getting Fast Track 385.
    Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by kontiki View Post
    Price looks reasonable but it seems that the tubes are covered in nylon material. My Sea Eagle is more like a rubberised type material similar to the zodiac type inflatables.

  60. #60

    Default Sea Eagle vs Advanced Elements Advanced Frame

    Hello there
    I'm in the process of deciding which inflatable kayak to buy and the 2 which interest me most are the Sea Eagle Fast Track 385 and the Advanced Elements Advanced Frame convertible. As it seems you may have experience of both should be grateful for your thoughts on each of these. I plan to use mine solo and tandem, and on rivers, lakes and coastal as my experience increases.
    Thanks in anticipation!

    Quote Originally Posted by andymce View Post
    Hi there,
    On my first post it would like it to be understood that I have been trekking for many years but I am very new to canoeing and as such should be treated with the relevant pity.
    I recently bought a Sea Eagle canoe and this thread seems to be the one to mention it in. (I dont have the storage space for a hard case (as much as I want one-and I really want one) and I dont have the money for a folding canoe.) Me and my son have been out in it a couple of times in earnest, once on Loch Awe and another time on my local river. I bought this as a cheap stop-gap till my advanced elements convertible arrived from America and so far it has been really impressive. It has two skegs which really helps me try to keep it on the straight, there is a fair amount of storage space (plenty of room for the two man tent, sleeping bags, stove, food, water, etc), it is very comfortable. It goes up easy and deflates in a matter of seconds. I have bumped into some 'hazards'-sharp pointy ones-and not a mark! I am looking forward to my advanced elements but I am having a lot of fun with the Sea Eagle canoe, as did my skeptical brothers on a recent paddle on the Clyde. They enjoyed it so much they want to do a tour of a loch or two, taking the camping gear and making a very long weekend of it. The advanced elements will be here by the weekend, and I will be heading out a day or two after it arrives. I will post a report on how it goes.

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