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Thread: Ally - Discontinued / Others

  1. #1
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    Default Ally - Discontinued / Others

    Please add any reviews for older (or brand new) models not covered elsewhere for this manufacturer.

  2. #2
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    Default not sure which one this is!

    I took a few shots of this Ally on Ullswater, on the 19th June 2010.

    I've no idea which one it is but it paddled well;









    Quite liked the hat

    The "dreadnought" look of the thing was hideous, but as I say; it did seem to go well

    cheers

    Steve


    Now paddling Either a Gumotex Palava 400 Or a Gumotex Solar Pro 410c and LOVING IT!

  3. #3

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    Just a short note:

    There is also the Ally - Voyageur 16'

    It has not been manufactured for long. Here are some information I took from the german extensive page of folding boats: faltboot.org (I would have loved to post a real link, but: 'your post count must be 2 or greater'...)

    Length [m]: 4,80
    Width [m]: 0,82
    Depth [m]: 0,34
    Weight [kg]: 17
    Capacity [kg]: 325

    When I bought it I liked the slender form of this boat and I think it is a pity that it is not manufactured any more...

    Cheers
    Heiko

  4. #4
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    Oi, Badger!

    That's me in the hideous Dreadnought. It is a bit "slabby" to be fair, but a goot flatwater solo boat.

    My 16'6 Ally river boat is less aesthetically challenged.

    Glad you like the hat, bit of a change from my normal one (see avatar ;-))

    Jim H. Posting for the first time in ~4 years!

  5. #5
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    Default

    Welcome back Sir. We have to few Ally owners on here, more the merrier.
    I have a 611DR which handles nicely solo or tandem, your views on your Ally's would be welcome
    Rob.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Actually, looking back, it's only been 2 years.
    About the time I've been tussling with a now moderately sorted allotment....It may have been the hat that was responsible.

    I kind of reviewed the thirteen footer above somewhere or other when I'd had it a wee while but with that now in proper perspective and never having reviewed the 16'6 riverboat I probably should (re)do both.

    How many are we happy "few" enlightened enough to have bought the correct folding canoe? I remember Wayland was after a fifteen footer years back and found one s/h if memory serves.

    Must find some less obscure threads to contribute too as well and say "hi" to MK

    Jim.

  7. #7
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    Question

    Just re-read this one!

    I'm really, seriously tempted to try to get hold of one of these "Dreadnoughts" (still think the hats as cool as a cool thing) or possibly the more "timpo" like 15ftr.

    Who if anyone, is selling these at the moment? or is anyone selling a 2nd hand one at all?


    Cheers

    Steve


    Now paddling Either a Gumotex Palava 400 Or a Gumotex Solar Pro 410c and LOVING IT!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rancid badger View Post
    Just re-read this one!

    I'm really, seriously tempted to try to get hold of one of these "Dreadnoughts" (still think the hats as cool as a cool thing) or possibly the more "timpo" like 15ftr.

    Who if anyone, is selling these at the moment? or is anyone selling a 2nd hand one at all?


    Cheers

    Steve
    Steve, dunno if you've seen this thread: http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...anoe-Importers

    I'm about to order the 15' DR from arts-outdoors.de. The "Dreadnought" might be a 13'7" at a guess?
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  9. #9
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    Default Ally Voyageur 16DR

    As mentioned by Heiko back in 2011, Ally used to make a canoe called the Voyageur 16DR. I believe this was sold from between the mid to late 1990s, so quite a short production period for some reason. Well I have just picked up a second hand Voyageur, which I managed to get wet the other evening.



    First impressions were very positive. What struck me the most, was the speed of the canoe, which was much faster than I had expected from a folding canoe. Now this is not to say speed is everything, but it did seem to glide rather effortlessly through the water.



    Having not paddled any other Ally canoe, I don't have much to go on, but it seemed to track very nicely. Turning the canoe was a little laborious even when healed over, which is probably down to the hull profile. Primary stability is rather good, if a little wobbly when I first got in. Then secondary stability seems reassuring, though i've yet to 'really' heal it over.



    On this Ally, the gunnel poles protrude from the bow and stern ends. This makes it a little fiddly to line up the slots for fixing the ribs, but it's not too much of an issue. The bow and stern curved poles also seem different to the modern ally design with protruding handles (green rubber covered), which I rather like for manhandling the canoe. I was fortunate that this canoe came with the spray deck, so it will be interesting to see how this fits over the handles...



    It took me quite a while to erect the ally, though hopefully this will get quicker... it's very disconcerting using a hammer to thump the ribs into place. But once fitted, the skin it tight as a... drum. I'm not sure I managed to fit the bow and stern curved poles quite as snug as they could be, so next time will pay more attention to this stage.

    Another observation I made was the size of the foam matting. It seemed to come almost right up to the underside of the gunnels. On other Ally canoes, I think this looks a bit lower.

    Because I tend to pry off the gunnels when paddling, I'm concerned that over time i'll wear through the skin. So i'm thinking about cutting a section of hose pipe which I can slot over the top for protection.

    The Trapper seats are quite strange to settle into. I managed to kneel with one leg each side. Not ideal, but it was fairly comfortable. I tried removing the seat, but found it more uncomfortable kneeling across the bars. Perhaps I need to try some different mats or make a bespoke seat / thwart.

    It was getting quite late by the time I was ready to head home, so I decided to pop the canoe on the roof-rack instead of fold it away. Wow, at 17kg it's very light! Though the bow and stern wobbled about a bit on the roof, so bow and stern straps would be essential if driving any distance with it on the roof I think.



    Well these are my initial observations on a discontinued Ally Voyageur. From my first time out, it seems like a great canoe. I'll look forward to paddling this more on waters in the UK and around Europe. However right now, I hope I can fit it all back into it's bag...

  10. #10
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    Now I know why a couple of the Ally canoes we saw in the middle of nowhere in Norway had funny sticky-out gunwhale ends. They did look slimmer and faster than my 15DR, but still different to the current non-DR versions.

    Nice purchase. The build will become faster with time. My tip is this; after each step in the build, stop. Have a really good look at what you've just done, is it absolutely spot on/straight etc. If not, fix it now, before going any further. This is especially true of lining up the floor mat properly. Any little mistakes seem to get exaggerated if you continue the build, and you can only adjust them at that point by starting to take it apart again...
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  11. #11

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    Ok - 39 minutes into my first attempted Ally assembly. One of these older-style ones with the handle ends. I only have the current instructions. I have rashly attempted it on my own, in my living room, while my husband is away, with the idea that I might not actually get it done but at least I would more or less understand the instructions by the time we put it together for real. So, bathed in sweat, I have got the gunwales and first two chine poles in place without putting any of them through the television or the French windows. The next step is the keel rod, which the instruction book says Ďmay well bow upwardsí. However, it seems happy to disappear into one stem piece so far that it doesnít even reach the other end, and the other stem piece is busy burrowing into the base mat like a toddler that doesnít want to eat the nice broccoli at all. It feels like it would have been a lot easier to put it in place before the chine rods. Iím probably only really typing this to give me an excuse to stop for a bit, but does anyone have any wisdom to impart here?


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  12. #12
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    Haha. You're explaining my first go at putting together an Ally canoe... So take a deep breath, you're doing just fine.

    I too have one of the older models of Ally with the gunnel bars protruding from the ends of the canoe. The key is to make sure the black locaters on these bars line up with the gaps for the ribs.

    Oh and the ribs... you've the best part to come! I assume you have the Norwegian hammer? You will need this for some extra persuasion - this was the hardest part for me initially, as it seemed counterintuitive to beat the living daylights out of an expensive canoe. But it works.

    All the best, and post a photo of the end result ;-)

    Matt

  13. #13

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    Yes, I have the hammer. And so far everyone who has described putting together an Ally has emphasised that you do have to hit it, so hopefully Iím prepared!


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  14. #14
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    Er - I DID warn you (Warm, isn't it ;-) )
    G

    'Adventure is relative. My adventure is another's commonplace.'

  15. #15

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    You did. Itís only a try-out, really. Iíve done better than I expected, so far, actually. And it is very very warm.


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  16. #16
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    An excellent first description of the "fun" involved in building an Ally for the first (few) time(s).

    The sweat happens whatever the temperature!!! But when its warm like last night, it does literally drip off me.

    With my keel rod, on the more recent design, it is quite tricky to bend it enough to get it into the end of the curved stem pieces. Putting some or all of the chine rods in definitely makes it easier to do. At first I only put in the other floor rods then the keel, and it was tough to make it do the "double bend" required to both get the rod in smoothly, as it can't be at an angle, and bend it enough to get it into the end. Now I put all the other chine rods in first and it seems easier. Its still a bugger to get out when knackered and on your own though!

    The hammering is therapeutic.

    Building tips.
    Keep the fabric as flat as possible whilst sliding in the gunwhale rods, and as mentioned, make sure the black plastic rings are lined up with the gaps as evenly as possible.
    Make sure the floor is as perfectly aligned as possible. Check this again after putting in the stem sections. A misaligned floor seems to be the main thing that causes "banana boat syndrome"!
    A second build a couple of days after the last seems to be much easier than when its been in the bag for ages! This may be mostly psychological, but maybe the fabric had stretched a bit during the first paddle.
    After each individual step, stand back, look at it, make sure its perfect/symmetrical etc. If you don't at each of the next stage, any misalignment will "escalate" again leading to banana issues.
    Building it in the rain is a nightmare, all gets more slippery and harder to keep hold of.
    Pay attention to precise seat positions, you can change the trim quite a bit by moving it/them around a little. Once sorted, maybe mark the rods with a bit of tape or similar.
    Carrying the canoe on your head using the middle rib/thwart as a yoke can lead to this bending a little. Mine seems OK soon, but isn't quite straight after (miles of!) portaging. Using a removable wooden yoke helps this, though its an extra thing to carry.
    Silicon based spray into the tubes will help both protect the springs/joints, and make it easier to slide them through the gunwhale fabric. But it will make them slippery too!

    Other things I've noted.
    Your hands will get filthy building it, so something to clean them afterwards is good.
    Do not, in any circumstances, drink beer or whisky whilst building the canoe ready for the next day's paddling!
    Auto-eddy* is installed on all DR versions, happens every time you want to take a picture, and cannot be turned off. (*unexpectedly spinning round)
    People want to talk to you about your canoe as you build it, allow an extra 15 mins for this if in a popular area! Do not, under any circumstances, attempt to talk and build!
    People want to talk to you when you pick your canoe up off a luggage belt at the airport. This includes lovely D-list celebrities from the telly box who you won't recognise but have an idea you should do.
    People want to talk to you when you paddle alongside them, and think they're a great idea and sound like they are about to rush out and buy one, until they ask about the price.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  17. #17

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    About 90 mins in now and Iíve got the first two ribs in place. Despite all my checking, the mat is slightly off at the tips. How will I know if Iíve got banana boat syndrome? Does it manifest differently in females?
    Iím assuming it gets easier now it is roughly boat shaped. Donít tell me if Iím wrong.


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  18. #18

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinningwoman View Post
    How will I know if I’ve got banana boat syndrome? Does it manifest differently in females?
    In my experience, its when you proudly stand back from your finished build, after spectators from the Old Forge pub in Inverie have been watching with interest, and one of them says "is it always a bit twisted like that?" Paddled it to the campsite then rebuilt it!

    This is the banana boat in use, but you can't really tell, though you can just about tell the mat is closer to one chine rod than its opposite. Basically, bows and stern were slightly twisted in opposite directions. Still paddled fine though.


    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  20. #20
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    Oh, and its basically looking fine to me.

    Don't be tempted to fiddle whilst building
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  21. #21

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    To the tune of ĎMhairiís Wedding:
    Hit it gaily, knock it in
    Now, the othersideís out agin
    One and two and three and- damn
    Time to have a cuppa.


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  22. #22

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    Plenty sticks and PVC
    Plenty time and plenty tea!
    Who needs fingernails anywae?
    All for Allyís building.

    Another rib in. Time to get back to work.


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  23. #23
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    I forgot one other thing on my list;

    There will be blood. Or bruises. Or both.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  24. #24

    Default Ally - Discontinued / Others


    Got there! Iím a bit confused by the seats, though. If the back seat is the flat one, it seems very near the cross thwart for my husbandís leg length. But if we face the other way, the back seat would slope backwards which would be a bit weird. I canít offhand see any other way it could have gone together.


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    Last edited by Spinningwoman; 19th-July-2019 at 01:10 PM.

  25. #25
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    Amazingly well done (well, it is a wee bit cooler today) and I love the ditty!

    Would it help if you turned the seat and frame nearest the camera around through 180degrees and called that "bow"?
    G

    'Adventure is relative. My adventure is another's commonplace.'

  26. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzle View Post
    Amazingly well done (well, it is a wee bit cooler today) and I love the ditty!

    Would it help if you turned the seat and frame nearest the camera around through 180degrees and called that "bow"?
    I wondered about that, but the seat Ďlegsí seemed too widely set to fit on the chine poles that side where once it has narrowed in. There are also some black plastic Ďstoppersí in their present position, so it looks like that is how it has been before. Iím planning to leave it up until Tim gets back, so weíll see.


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  27. #27
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    As I read about your triumphs and tribulations this kept coming to mind

    https://youtu.be/r5XX9LX2es4

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bonefish Blues View Post
    As I read about your triumphs and tribulations this kept coming to mind

    https://youtu.be/r5XX9LX2es4
    Chuckle


    Quote Originally Posted by Spinningwoman View Post
    I wondered about that, but the seat ‘legs’ seemed too widely set to fit on the chine poles that side where once it has narrowed in. There are also some black plastic ‘stoppers’ in their present position, so it looks like that is how it has been before. I’m planning to leave it up until Tim gets back, so we’ll see.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Difficult to tell what's going on with the seats from that photo, could you post one from the side too? My seats are the newer "tractor" seats which are probably more flexible in positioning, but ain't exactly comfy!
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  29. #29

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    Itís a bit tricky getting far enough away from it in the living room to get a good side-on photo, but I got this one. Iíve turned it upside down for the moment to let me take the coffee table back off the couch


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  30. #30

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    Actually, if Tim has enough leg room, it might work better mechanically having him a bit more forward than the canoes weíve used before - typically weíve ended up with his natural stroke providing a bit too much Ďturní, so being nearer the centre ought to reduce that if the spatial geometry bit of my brain is functioning correctly.


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  31. #31
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    Hmm, sorry, defeating my logic too! I would have guessed swapping them over might mean the shorter legs clip to a "higher" part of the chine rods, but can't see how that would work in reality.

    Not helped by googling "Ally folding canoe seats old style" in Images coming up mainly with pictures of my own posts on SOTP!
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

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  32. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Hmm, sorry, ....
    Not helped by googling "Ally folding canoe seats old style" in Images coming up mainly with pictures of my own posts on SOTP!
    Thatís what comes of having posted 22,359 times...



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  33. #33
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    Well done on completing the canoe. Building an Ally canoe to Aly Bain... I like it!

  34. #34

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    Very pleasant example of an English pub paddle with mixed craft. Cheers!

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