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Thread: Kids canoeing / kayaking book

  1. #1

    Default Kids canoeing / kayaking book

    Can anyone recommend a good canoeing / kayaking book for children aged 8 and 11?

  2. #2
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    I can't think of any one specific book ideally suited to youngsters but Bill Mattos' Practical guide to kayaking and Canoeing is chock full of colour pictures which should appeal and is also very informative. Here is the Amazon search for it. It also offers other beginners' books by the same author.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_...Go.x=12&Go.y=9

  3. #3

    Default Thanks

    Ideal, and thanks for the info, ordered today.

  4. #4
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    Looking at the response to this thread there does seem to be a dearth of books for children in canoes. I wonder if this is because children do not have the buying power to get a canoe or if it is just a missed target.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  5. #5
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    Take a look at Kayaking by Bill Nealy. It's a great cartoon kayaking book, and although much of it is tongue in cheek it also carries lots good information / training about (mostly white water) paddling too, kids usually love it.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2007
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    Default Cradle to Canoe: Camping and Canoeing With Children (Paperback)

    I was looking at this book for younger children, pre birth actually... I forget how much is relevant for "older" children of 8-11.

    Author is Rolf Kraiker, I belive I've seen his name here at SotP. Plus a few other places.

    I Just took a look for it now and could not find it.

    I forget if it was his suggestion, or one of Bill's that you can take a small toy boat tied to the end of a string, and allow the kids to play with that. It worked for me. I've a samll kayak, that Winnie the Poo, Tigger, and Pigglet all wedge into. Then Kaylyn talks them through all the scary big waves.

    The other theme was that kids basically find their own fun while campin, don't let them play with fire. do get them a small paddle, and suffer with their paddleing. Don't go on long trips to start. Sadly my memory is such that almost 4 years later I don't remember any real details.

    I really should find it again, an re-read it.

    Amazon has it if you can not find it locally. but they indicate they currently only have 5 left. plus 30 or so second hand ones. "better hurry"


    http://www.amazon.com/Cradle-Canoe-C.../dp/1550462946

    Regards,

    Myrl

  7. #7

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    My wife Debra and I tried to distill many years of experience in a book to help parents introduce their kids to paddling in a way that keeps the fun and safety at the forefront. It was our working assumption that kids who were introduced to the benefits avaialable would grow into more well-rounded and better adjusted adults and now that our boys are 17 and 21 I think we can say with confidence that it worked, at least for our guys. Our book Cradle to Canoe was written to cover the different aspects of growth in children and there is content that addresses issues from infants to teenagers. That said, our original manuscript of 120,000 words was reduced to about 80,000 by the time it went to print so it's not as comprehensive as it might have been, but I think it should still provide lots of useful tips for parents of kids regardless of their age. It may have been mentioned in other books, but our certainly did contain the suggestion of tying a toy to a string and also the suggestion that kids will find their own entertainment and it isn't necessary to bring along toys from home except to have some in reserve in case they don't find enough to engage them.

    We've had a lot of really nice feedback from parents over the years thanking us for writing the book but the comment I found most heartening came at a symposium where we'd done a presentation on the book. After our session, a couple came up to us for some conversation and the husband told us his wife let him know that they were in a family way by presenting him with a copy of the book. When he asked why she was giving him the book because they didn't have kids, she just smiled without saying anythinig until the realization dawned on him. We walked away from that presentation feeling especially good.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolf Kraiker View Post
    After our session, a couple came up to us for some conversation and the husband told us his wife let him know that they were in a family way by presenting him with a copy of the book. When he asked why she was giving him the book because they didn't have kids, she just smiled without saying anythinig until the realization dawned on him. We walked away from that presentation feeling especially good.
    I love that!

    We initially bought a canoe because our young daughter became to heavy to carry into the wilderness (and couldn't walk very far). This was one of the first books I read, after seeing it being praised on this site.

    As a new dad, I sometimes questioned the wisdom of taking our toddler wild camping but this book was very reassuring, and full of good tips!

    Canoeing and camping is now, probably, the best thing we ever do together as a family.
    All of life is a journey ...

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by travellas View Post
    I sometimes questioned the wisdom of taking our toddler wild camping ...

    Canoeing and camping is now, probably, the best thing we ever do together as a family.
    One of the questions/challenges that we often get asked is something along the lines of "why take youg kids somewhere that dangerous and also really expensive, they're so young they won't remember anyway". While it's true that our boys don't have much direct memory of a lot of the trips we did when they were young, our philosphy was that each trip was an incremental learning experience that built onto the next. The first trip we did in the Canadian arctic began with a car trip about 5,000 Km one way. Imagine a family of four, mom, dad & two kids age 5 & 8 jammed into a VW Jetta towing a trailer and every nook and cranny loaded with 3 weeks of wilderness kit. We even put a layer of stuff under where the kids were sitting. Most families have a hard time driving to the corner store without fights errupting but by then our boys were both used to the confinement of travel in a canoe but more importantly they'd become such good friends that we went the distance without complaint. The best time I ever had in the wild was a trip the four of us did to the Athabasca Sand dunes in northern Saskatchewan (http://www.blazingpaddles.ca/trip_reports/athabasca/ ) It was a slow paced trip with lots of really amazing experiences that formed some increadibly tight bonds as a family. Through experiences like that, I can proudly say that my boys are not just my sons, they are also my friends. There's no way of knowing how much of what they are now is an attribute of nature or nurture, but I've never regretted one cent of the money we've spent bring them with us.

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