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Thread: Kids starter kit

  1. #1
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    Default Kids starter kit

    Since I am taking the girls out a bit more I have got a few bits together for them to use outdoors. They already have a plastic bucket with lid for collecting treasure and items of interest.

    They now have a small leather pouch (thanks Warthog1981) inside which there is a disposable lighter, a firesteel and a stainless steel child's opinel (the one with the rounded end like a butter knife).

    I might also let them start to use, under close supervision, the army trangia.

    Bearing in mind they are 6 and 8 years old what else if anything would you let them have.
    John

  2. #2
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    Map and compass, if you aren't already doing that sort of stuff with them, even if it's just showing them the symbols on the map and how to find north and turn the map that way. I don't remember being taught to read a map and compass (I'm hoping that's cos I was too young to remember, and not senility setting in), something I am eternally greatful to whoever actually did the teaching, it is easy second nature stuff to me. I use memory map on the puter, that way you can print as many A4 maps as you want so the girls can trash them, cheap 15 laminator makes them waterproof too.

    Having been playing with fire by friction myself this week, I wish someone had done that with me as a kid, requires a little bit of strength though I guess so may be better left for a while.

    A little set of binoculars, just cheap 8x20s (jessops ones are good and probably pick them up for around 10) or something along those lines for things far away, a small hand lens for the little things and a few little jars to catch them in. I really like polarised glasses for watching fish and other stuff under the water but might be hard to find cheap kids ones, and disposable cameras for recording stuff (they're cheap and no one minds if they get dropped, lost or broken).

  3. #3
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    Walkie-talkies?
    Picture yourself in a boat on a river,

  4. #4
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    Walkie talkies we just got from Asda. Still to try them canoeing though.

    A hand lens is a very good idea. Binoculars I have thought about but I don't use them much myself.

    I have shown them where we are going etc o the map but their own print out would be good. I would have to photograph the map though as I am still using the paper based versions.
    John

  5. #5
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    Just thinking what my 3 year old would like (and predicting what she'd like when she's older).

    Fishing kit?

    Kids tarp? Practice makes perfect!

    Own snacks in a pouch.

    Map and compass is a great idea in an earlier post. Same is true for bino's. Or a telescope? Or scelatope as my daughter calls it

    Own plate / bowl / mug / cutlery / cooking pot?

    Brew kit? Hot choc kit?

    Fire stick / skewer? For cooking stuff on the open fire.

    Or - all of the above cookware plus their own wannigan!?!?

    Sketch pad / painting book?

    Camera? Might be stretching it a bit there.
    The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.

  6. #6
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    Default Me and my Godson

    Did a canoe with my God son when he was about 5-6 which he loved. Canoed onto main island on Derwent Water, put tent up, brewed up and cooked dinner on the trangia (dont think I let him do that bit). We didnt even stay overnight but he was proud as punch sittingin the entrance to the tent. He is now chasing the girls in his own canadian canoe so maybe I put him on the right path in some way.

  7. #7
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    Just to clarify I am thinking of small stuff to carry with them for exploring etc. rather than a full kit for camping (which they will have). It was kind of me that started to go adrift talking about the trangia
    John

  8. #8
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    Whistle.

    Ross was a bit disappointed when I gave him a whistle. He thought a flaregun would be much more fun.

  9. #9
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    Why didnt i think of a flaregun. What about a small candle? A little tea light candle is small enough. Maybe a small bit of cotton wool that they have use if they cant get anything to light with the fire steel. A collapsable cup, there good. A pencil and a waterproof notepad, there small. And some energy sweets, they always come in useful. Binoculars are a great idea as said above, they used to be cheap with petrol down here.
    Walkie-talkies are ok but the lack of power and the risk of dropping them( A person at the radio club i go to had some and his kid dropped his down the toilet my accident, he got it back though) so you might need to attach it onto them, it also helps to have it so that they can bend down to look at stuff and go over logs without it jabbing into thei side, i have it all the time with my ameture radio handheld, the one i was being lent was even worse, it had a metal aerial that had broke and it kept jabbing into me, it did 5W, but ofcourse it was turned down when i used it on PMR. You can only use 0.5W, which isnt alot but it shoul be OK. If there going to be exploring on there own keep checking there in range of you, its amazing was how much trees can block RF.

    Joe

  10. #10
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    Default walkie talkies

    On page 1523 of the new Argos book you will find walkie talkies that you wear on your head so are hands free for paddling. My mates kids have them and he gets as much use out of them as they do.

    Why didn't they have stuff like that when I was a wain??
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  11. #11
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    Bottle of washing up liquid and a bowl just incase they miss home??

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

  12. #12
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    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
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    Glass bottomed bucket for looking at stuff in shallow water ?

  13. #13
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    we got our daughter a bug box with a magnifying lid last year ( size of a small cup).
    It goes everywhere ( including the canoe, great for water creatures) and they can literally spend hours at a camp finding small creatures to look at, I am constantly amazed at how much she can catch with it.
    haven't thought of letting them loose with their own knives yet I was 8 before I got my first one.

    More important than things is to teach them to be confident outdoors and go over what to do in certain circumstances.
    I've gone over basic first aid with them and even Jade(5) can put an adult in the recovery position.
    Last edited by Silvergirl; 24th-August-2006 at 07:57 PM. Reason: spelling as usual
    'There is no wealth but life itself.'

  14. #14
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    seems to me youre already giving them what they really need and want and will treasure in later life. that is:-
    time and attention doing things together with their old man and having fun in the outdoors
    andy
    nature is m X-box

  15. #15
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    any of the collins nature guides are good to have,buy the full set and take a different one on each trip out,there easy to read and really easy to use.

  16. #16
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    Hillbillie's fishing idea is good - especially if they get a chance to catch fish. Good for you too. Free food!

    PG

  17. #17
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    our sons always had a small kite and a pack of cards (half-size). the kites have grown with them but we still carry a of some sort and the cards out on mountaineering trips (they are now 14 & 17). Their small Swiss army knives were always a firm favourite too and their head torches.

  18. #18
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    A Krill light each maybe, for that particular odd glow they have - just in case they need a bit of discrete light, and a torch is too much. I find these are much less harsh on night time eyes that my glo-toob, plus they'll run for longer.

    Not quite so good for attaching as a nav aid and being seen from a distance tho' - so best get one of each to be sure.

  19. #19
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    I'm sure we have one of those pocket kites somewhere. That would be fun for them to try from the canoe as well.

    I should have said that on the draw strings of the bags are a whistle and one of the group buy key ring lights. They still have a whistle on their PFD but this is for when they have taken that off.
    John

  20. #20
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    A good thing to do with those pocket kits is to buy some cheap kit string, put aload of string on the kite and fly it. I had a Micky Mouse one when i was younger and it had about 3 lengths of kite string on, when it was at full length it looked smaller then a match box, plus lots of people can see them and you can nearly track it to where the person is. If you tie it onto the canoe when you are camping, they should be able to see it when they go off exploring. Plus its very fun to see how high you can get it.

    Joe

  21. #21
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    Default kids stuff...


    A wee tree guide, a head torch/snap light, mini binoculars, emergency poncho..how about a rope to carry for a swing?

    Expand your mind there's plenty space for it...

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