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Thread: Why Bannock? and are their other variants?

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    Default Why Bannock? and are their other variants?

    Ok so Mike B and I tried Lloyds fabulous bannock recipe.
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ead.php?t=1282

    and this got me thinking. Why bannock? what are its origins, I mean why did old time canadian canoe travelling traders take flour, milk powder, sugar, baking powder and raisins with them? and what other variants do any of you have? now I've got the bug for this bannock cooking I'd like to try more.
    Leone_blanco

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247
    Ok so Mike B and I tried Lloyds fabulous bannock recipe.
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ead.php?t=1282

    and this got me thinking. Why bannock? what are its origins, I mean why did old time canadian canoe travelling traders take flour, milk powder, sugar, baking powder and raisins with them? and what other variants do any of you have? now I've got the bug for this bannock cooking I'd like to try more.
    No...they used whole grain flour, eggs, (when they had them) molasses, and dried fruit.

    For those of you who haven't seen the Ray Mears version during his trip in Canada, try sprinkling some dark rum over the bannock AFTER you've cooked it, and add some dried egg powder mmmmmmmmmm


    Historically, it seems to me that the Bannock recipe is remarkably similar to Welsh cakes. I'm sure that the Celtic crowd took it with them (be it Scots or Welsh) into the "New World"....

    Phil

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    The choices with bannock and camp breads is pretty much endless. bannock and pemmican were useful additions for the older timers as they generally last for ages and have a high calorific value. I generally just use Flour and milk power 2:1 a little baking powder to help it rise. You can add anything to bannock really. I like them sweet as well as savory.

    I have some interesting recipies in my camp cooking file somewhere. i will post a couple when I find them.

    Bushcraft Survival and First Aid Training.

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    Remember to post any recipes int eh sticky thread so I know where to find them when I sort out a permanent home for them.
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247
    Ok so Mike B and I tried Lloyds fabulous bannock recipe.
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ead.php?t=1282

    and this got me thinking. Why bannock? what are its origins, I mean why did old time canadian canoe travelling traders take flour, milk powder, sugar, baking powder and raisins with them? and what other variants do any of you have? now I've got the bug for this bannock cooking I'd like to try more.
    Bannock is a kind of bread, usually prepared by pan-frying. It is native to Scottish or Manx cuisine but was introduced during the fur trade to the Native American culture in Canada and much of the United States, where it is now so widespread that it is considered a traditional food.
    There were a lot of scottish in Canada in the early days as they could handle the cold climate
    Thank you

    John O'Connell
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    O C Outdoor
    Web page www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor
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    This may spread a bit more confusion - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bannock_Burn, sounds like one not to paddle !

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    I was already thinking about this on the way home Lee.
    How about leaving out all the sweet stuff and using powdered egg in place of the milk powder and using cheese and bacon as the filling.Mike B...

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247
    Ok so Mike B and I tried Lloyds fabulous bannock recipe.
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ead.php?t=1282

    and this got me thinking. Why bannock? ...what other variants do any of you have? now I've got the bug for this bannock cooking I'd like to try more.

    Bannock is an easy, filling, just add water recipe that is hard to screw up even if you are being eaten alive by bugs and are half stoned on native "pipe weeds". Eggs will keep for a week or so safely if packed in flour too; although the old guys probably kept them longer (even if the yolks had feathers). The Scottish fur traders probably didn't have much sugar or raisins but would have access to maple sugar and local berries.
    Instead of raisins try using some dried Cranberries, which will give it some zest. I am not a rum man; but a bit of blended whiskey may find its way onto my bannock.

    You were not bitten by a bannock bug, (they are extinct) my recipe is like a narcotic, a one try addict. The first hit is free but the rest will cost you.


    Now for a real filling camp food try this stuff. (you bake it at home first)
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...6&postcount=25
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike B
    I was already thinking about this on the way home Lee.
    How about leaving out all the sweet stuff and using powdered egg in place of the milk powder and using cheese and bacon as the filling.Mike B...
    I feel and experiment coming on.

    Cheese sauce granules
    powdered whole egg.
    and those dried 'bacon' bit.

    The only thing that hit me though is it will be expensive. Have you seen the price of powdered whole egg these days! I can only find the supercook stuff and I have not seen it in a barrel shop in ages.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

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    We had a recie book which described the stuff as Selkirk Bannock although that might have been just that particular version amongst others I had not seen at the time. That would make it Scottish (just).

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    Isn't the Internet great... I never new that there was a Native American tribe called the Bannock or that that there was the Bannock War of 1878 between the said Nation and the USG.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

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    I'll have to think pretty hard on cooking this then ...
    I wonder how it'd work with rice or maize flours ?

    I can see how the dried fruit would work ok, or fresh herbs and mushrooms too.

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    Are there variations!!, you bet.

    Go on BCUK and search "Bannock" and stand back for a very busy cooking session.

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    I got the girls to help me make up some dry mix last night and we will be trying different ways of cooking them on our trip this weekend. I'll let you know how it turns out.

    The problem will be if we like them as recreating the mix may be difficult. One has plain flour, oats and milk powder the other has self raising flour, milk powder, oats, raisins and dried fruit.

    Like I say, we will see.
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike B View Post
    I was already thinking about this on the way home Lee.
    How about leaving out all the sweet stuff and using powdered egg in place of the milk powder and using cheese and bacon as the filling.Mike B...
    I reckon we won't be needing the canoes next time we visit Pugneys, just a load of cooking ingredients, and an empty stomach We should try the savoury ones. so all we need now is a starter and we have a veritable bannock feast.
    Leone_blanco

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247 View Post
    Ok so Mike B and I tried Lloyds fabulous bannock recipe.
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ead.php?t=1282

    and this got me thinking. Why bannock? what are its origins, I mean why did old time canadian canoe travelling traders take flour, milk powder, sugar, baking powder and raisins with them? and what other variants do any of you have? now I've got the bug for this bannock cooking I'd like to try more.
    Not really bannock, but my great aunt used to make a very basic fry bread made with flour cut with bear grease You could use lard instead), water, and salt. It was fried in more bear grease.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    Not really bannock, but my great aunt used to make a very basic fry bread made with flour cut with bear grease You could use lard instead), water, and salt. It was fried in more bear grease.
    I have made that with pork fat. Tasty! My friend Tim wraps the bread dough around canned meat before re-frying. Also tasty!
    Lloyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    Not really bannock, but my great aunt used to make a very basic fry bread made with flour cut with bear grease You could use lard instead), water, and salt. It was fried in more bear grease.
    Coming from a Nation that killed off all our bears in the middle ages and having only seen them in zoos it seems stange to think of them as a item of food.

    What do they taste like?


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by clcuckow View Post
    What do they taste like?
    You just know that someone is going to say they taste like bear don't you.


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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork View Post
    You just know that someone is going to say they taste like bear don't you.

    A bit like pork, unless it has been garbage fed.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


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    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    A bit like pork, unless it has been garbage fed.
    A lot of variety. Too much variety. You never know what you're going to get. Some tasted like pork, some, almost like beef. We ate a lot of it when I was young. Unlike the rest of my family, which just loves it, I never really liked it much unless it was canned. Canned, it tasted more like beef, and it had a great gravy.

    Bear oil is God's gift to a good cook.

    Wing and I grabbed some meat out of the freezer for a canoe trip this spring. We were very disheartened to find it was bear rather than venison. Very stringy and greasy.

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    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly View Post
    I got the girls to help me make up some dry mix last night and we will be trying different ways of cooking them on our trip this weekend. I'll let you know how it turns out.

    The problem will be if we like them as recreating the mix may be difficult. One has plain flour, oats and milk powder the other has self raising flour, milk powder, oats, raisins and dried fruit.

    Like I say, we will see.
    I Like the idea of making up the dry mix first,I'll try that next time I'm out.
    The problem I'm having is stopping the mix sticking to me like glue!!!
    any suggestions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Laird View Post
    I Like the idea of making up the dry mix first,I'll try that next time I'm out.
    The problem I'm having is stopping the mix sticking to me like glue!!!
    any suggestions.
    If you mean after you have added the water to the mix there are a couple of options:

    Some Bannocks/drop scones like the cake ones are made wetter, the consistency of a sponge/cake batter. In this case you would be mixing in another container with a wooden spoon anyway.

    If you are making a breadier one mix with a wooded spoon again but reserving some of the mix or some extra flour to use when hand forming the bannock.

    Remember that when you are using chemical raising agents like baking powder or soda you do not kneed it like with yeast based bread.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

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    As Blackberrys are now in season I throw a load into Lloyds now infamous bannock mix in place of raisins. Once I got over the colour it was damn fine although I reckon i needed to put more to increase the flavour, not quite strong enough for my liking, although it is worth cutting back a touch on the sugar.
    Leone_blanco

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