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Thread: Camping Recipes - Your Suggestions Please!

  1. #1
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    Default Camping Recipes - Your Suggestions Please!

    Finally we have a holiday booked - really looking forward to it. What I'm not looking forward to is our typical camping menu, which alternates between Pasta 'n' Sauce, Sweet 'n' Sour, and the cop out of Fish 'n' Chips!

    This is therefore a cry for help! What's your favourite al fresco meal for two, and how do you cook it?

    Our stove is a single-ring petrol burner (whisperlite), and our cooking gear consists of a 2 litre pot, a 1.5 litre pot, and a lid that doubles as a frying pan:



    Looking forward to all your mouthwatering suggestions!

    Blutack.
    The Canoeist's prayer: "Lord grant me the serenity to walk the portages I must, The courage to run the rapids I can, And the wisdom to know the difference".

    John Muir Trust - Wild Places for Nature & People.

  2. #2
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    Default My fav recipe...

    I have the same stove...

    I belted a pheasant on the way to a trip once and cut the breasts off with a very sharp opinel. When out camping I fried a finely chopped onion, added the breast of pheasant and tried to cook it as slow as u could on a whisperlight, I then added red wine and loads of raspberrys and blaeberrys (fresh picked) and let it simmer. With the other pan I made some onion flavboured mash (with wood sorrell added for a wee zing) as a bed for the pheasant and sauce.

    By the gods I felt Herne couldn't have made a better meal himself!
    Expand your mind there's plenty space for it...

  3. #3
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    We usually cook on open fires but have recently thought about getting a stove. Below are a few fun recipes we use. The chili's should go well on a stove; the baked goods??? Hard to say? Also a good quick Canadian favorite is just add water instant mashed potatos and canned meat.

    As with all outdoor cooking, the environmental conditions, inconsistent fire temperatures and your cooking equipment, and cooking style, will all be a factor in meal preparation. As such, there is no point in giving cooking times, or measurements or telling you how to do what. Just mix things together, add water and fire and cook until done. Some of the best meals I have had, have come from trying to figure out ways to save a botched recipe. When in doubt with baked goods, add more flour. When in doubt with everything else, add more spice.

    Lloyd's Kick Ass Cowboy Chili
    • 1 pound ground buffalo, brown in cast iron pot
    • 1 can of chili style tomatoes do not drain
    • 1 can red kidney beans do not drain
    • 1 can of chili style beans
    • let boil for a while
    • 1can of corn
    • Chili powder or spice pack to taste and stir
    • Some fresh tomato cut up as desired
    • Remove from direct heat and keep warm for the next few days. Feeds many and is good served with cornbread.
    Lloyd's Colon Cleaning Canoe Chili
    • Boil a full pot of water, your going to need it.
    • Add 1 part of dehydrated kidney beans.
    • Add 1 part of dehydrated black turtle beans.
    • Cook until soft and tasty, add water if needed. (May take all day)
    • Add 1 part Soy based Bulk Barn vegetarian chili mix.
    • Add water if necessary as chili mix soaks up water.
    • Add chili powder or spice pack to taste and stir.
    • Cook until the consistency of mud or wet cement and serve.
    • Keep warm for the next few days. May look revolting but that is just the black from the turtle beans. Feeds many. Will also leave digestive system clean and shiny.
    Angela's Chocolate Cake with Marshmallows
    • Mix Bulk Barn "just add water cake mix" 1 to 1 with water.
    • Continue mixing until all the lumps go away.
    • Heat olive oil and pour cake mix into frying pan.
    • Clean mixing pot and stirring thing thoroughly with tongue.
    • Bury the frying pan in the coals of the fire as deep as possible, and add coals over the top if you have a lid.
    • Check often for consistency.
    • Flip cake over if desired to firm the top.
    • Add marshmallows to the top or melt them and mash them into the top of the cake, let cook and devour.
    Lloyd's Bannock
    • 2 parts multigrain flour.
    • 2 parts powdered skim milk.
    • 1 part demerrera sugar.
    • Lot of raisins.
    • Some baking powder.
    • Add small amounts of water and mix until dough like.
    • Heat olive oil and mash into pan.
    • Tilt the frying pan on a stick so that the dough is facing the coals in the fire testing occasionally for consistency.
    • The bottom may scorch a bit, but will still be tasty.
    • Cook until done.
    Last edited by Lloyd; 31st-July-2006 at 03:58 AM. Reason: formatting
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  4. #4

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    Lloyd I'm suprised you can fit in a canoe If that's your diet!
    the bannock sounds great I will be trying that soon.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Laird
    Lloyd I'm suprised you can fit in a canoe If that's your diet!
    the bannock sounds great I will be trying that soon.
    I grew up on a farm so I have the metabolism of a race horse. Let's just say I don't get that many miles to the gallon. On my last week long trip I started out the week before with a diet of ice cream to pack on some pounds before leaving. The day I left I was up to 192lbs, when I came back I was 178lbs. I am starting to slow down a bit with age, but I still have trouble keeping the weight on when out in the bush. I am working on an insulated dry ice based cooler system to allow me to take some ice cream on a shorter trip with no portages. It is still experimental but the theory is the insulated dry ice melts more slowly and then only sublimates into C02 gas (no dripping mess). The problem is that dry ice is expensive to play with and is colder than regular ice so it messes with the ice cream flavor. It may not get my equipment seal of approval for a few years yet. Angela’s chocolate cake is much easier as far as sweeties go and for lots of calories a few spoons full of oil or butter goes into most dishes.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  6. #6
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    I usa a Whisperlite also and find it awkward to cook food slowly as it is an all or nothing affair with the burner, hower if you bend two lengths of steel rod, similar to goal posts and stick these into the ground as a pan rest it will maintain a greater distance between pan and flame. As for cooking I take as much fresh veg as possible, it will last a good few days, also marinated chicken pieces in a stay fresh container or frozen in 'sandwich' bags (watch for spillage as they defrost ) these will do your first 1-2 days.

    Sweet Chilli Stir Fry

    Olive oil
    Pre browned chicken
    1 Large onion
    Fresh garlic (lots)! chopped
    Bell Peppers
    Courgette
    Sugar snap peas
    tomatoes
    Mushrooms
    Soy sauce
    Sweet chilli dipping sauce
    Straight to wok noodles

    chop all the veg (course) add the oil to the pan (I never leave home with out a wok) heat until smoking add onion and garlic until light brown, then add the pre browned chicken and other veg roughly in the order above, i.e. the slower cooking (harder) veg first. When cooked through add the soy and heat through then 3/4 of the sweet chilli sauce, add the noodles and cook for a couple of minutes depending on how crunchy or soft you like your veg. Eat with chopsticks (to stay in keeping)

    The chicken can be replaced with other meat, or if towards the end of the trip use hotdog sausages (they aren't as bad as they sound), tinned mushrooms, peas etc. . Ensure you use sweet chilli sauce, its not very hot at all.
    Leone_blanco

  7. #7
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    My best camping meal is lentil dhal

    chop and sweat 1 large onion in oil
    add chopped fresh ginger (lots), a couple of fresh chillis and some coriander, cumin salt and pepper
    add a bag of red lentils and cover with water/stock
    simmer till it looks right, add more water if needed
    add some garam masala and serve with naan bread/salad
    the ingredients keep fairly well, are quite light and you're not eating dehydrated, processed rubbish.

    a canoeing friend has just bought a dehydrater, im waiting to see how that performs.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Ojibwe Recipe:

    Cook hand parched wild rice - half as much rice as water ( a little goes a long way) for about 15 minutes.

    Broil venison steaks on a hot fire (black on the outside - red in the center)

    Lay venison on a bed of wild rice and sweet onions and simmer in maple syrup.

  9. #9

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    My fave has got to be Pasta Carbonara. Well simple! Cook your pasta and put to the side then fry your onions with garlic and loads of bacon, add your shrooms then cream and mix in the pasta. Hey presto, yum yum

    Have you thought of buying a dehydrator? They are the best as you can make your fave meals and just dehydrate them....much better than the shop bought stuff.

  10. #10

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    I like to make up a couple of Bannock mixes that only need water. My current favorites are:

    Cheese and Potato

    1 1/2 cups of plain flour
    1/2 a cup of instant mashed potato. Powdered work but I think that flaked (like Mr. Mash is better). SMASH will work but it need powdering first.
    1 cup of powdered milk
    a good slug of instant cheese sauce powder. I don't measure it I go by look as smell
    a good pinch of salt
    1-1 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder

    Options

    Replace the salt with a good pinch of garlic salt and a good pinch of onion granules. If you like it spicy, chili flakes.

    Cranberry and Ginger

    2 cups plain floor
    1 cup milk powder
    1 tablespoon powdered whole egg
    pinch of salt
    1-1 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder
    Mucavardo sugar
    Fine chopped glace ginger
    dried cranberries

    The last three are mixed to taste.

    I usually cook it between a couple of deep tin plates either on the hot ashes of an open fire or over a bbq either way with a couple of coals on the top plate.


    Here is a question for you all.

    Has anyone had a go at making a 'hay box' slow oven for a canoe? I would have though that it would have to be waterproofed but I like the idea of putting dinner in at breakfast and at the end of a days paddling open up a steaming hot dinner. It would also be something look at longingly during the journey

    Missy: All I ever use to dehydrate meals/jerky is my electric oven on about 60-70C over night or longer.
    Last edited by clcuckow; 31st-July-2006 at 09:29 PM. Reason: adding tin plate cooking


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  11. #11
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    Making this thread a sticky till I have time to add a section to the main site for the recipes. Keep the suggestions coming.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  12. #12
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    I like the idea of the bannock am going to try Lloyds tomorrow all being well. Will it cook on a whisperlite do you reckon or would one of those portable disposable BBQ things be better?
    Leone_blanco

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247
    I like the idea of the bannock am going to try Lloyds tomorrow all being well. Will it cook on a whisperlite do you reckon or would one of those portable disposable BBQ things be better?
    I have done it one disposable bbq several times. The problem is getting the coals on top. If you have gloves you could turn it over so the top tin is now the bottom. The best I have found is one of those cheap folding bbq that you can get for about £3 but you have bring your own charcoal because you can easily remove the grill and get some coals. I would also recommend that you either do it before it get 'cooking' hot or wait till it is cooling or it will burn.

    On your stove I would have thought it would be to hot unless you have either one of those folding stove top ovens or maybe a wooden grilling planks? I have got one that I have not used before I might have to give it a go.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  14. #14
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    Would it not work if I angled the pan towards the stove/ BBQ as Lloyd states 'Tilt the frying pan on a stick so that the dough is facing the coals in the fire testing occasionally for consistency' ?
    Leone_blanco

  15. #15

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    the top is not the problem it is the bottom.
    when I do the propped pan method I cook it though from the bottom till the top starts to firm up, if not it can slide into a heap in the fire.

    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247
    Would it not work if I angled the pan towards the stove/ BBQ as Lloyd states 'Tilt the frying pan on a stick so that the dough is facing the coals in the fire testing occasionally for consistency' ?
    Last edited by clcuckow; 31st-July-2006 at 10:33 PM.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  16. #16
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    Default Two ideas

    Hot Italian Pasta salad
    This was cooked for sunday lunch (and to absorb alcohol) by the rather ravishing Italian girlfriend of a skipper I sailed with - but would work well as a camping recipe. would neeed to be at start of trip or after a shoping exped as really needs some fresh stuff to be at its best.

    Chop red onions, garlic (lots) cherry tomatoes (lots), put in bowl with extra virgin olive oil (lots), olives and chopped fetta cheese - leave this to sit for at least half to one hour for the flavours to mix. Add some fresh basil if you can get it.

    Cook off a pan of of egg penne pasta (fresh will cook quick, dry does not go off without keeping cool) drain and....

    Add to the other mixture and stir. .. and serve best with good robust red wine. Despite the non Italian cheese it has a classic Italian taste without cooking lot of different stuff. I was bowled over by the simplicity of of it.

    Lomo Saltado - this a Peruvian fave. A classic dish from the country where up in the hills people will cook on an open fire or use a family size primus stove (manufactured in the country and called a "blue Llama")

    should be served with rice and chips (french fries) but would be good with just rice or cous cous.

    cook the rice, with a little pre-fried garlic and oil and leave to stand

    cut steak into thin bit size slices - stir fry, - put to one side

    stir fry garlic, sliced onions, sliced tomatoes,
    add salt and pepper, oregano
    add more oil if needed
    add chili pepper (fresh yellow if possible)
    add parsley, vinagar (I often leave this out and use lemon juice) soy sauce - stir and cook
    add meat juice from under steak, cook a little more but do not overcook
    finally add pre-cooked meat and finely sliced red bell pepper

    Top tip... do not burn the garlic! ensure this does not happen by keeping everything moving!

    hope these are of interest
    Seadog

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247
    I like the idea of the bannock am going to try Lloyds tomorrow all being well. Will it cook on a whisperlite do you reckon or would one of those portable disposable BBQ things be better?
    Never tried it on a stove? It may work on very low heat with a few flip overs like a big pancake. My bannock, known in some circles as Loch Rannoch Bannock is not dough like, it's more like cake mix. As such it is quite sticky and stays in the pan well even when tilted. The bottom always scorches a bit. I thought no one would want this part but as it turns out there is always a fight between me, Angela and Tim to see who gets it. I only use Thomson Raisins too but any type will do. The tilting the fry pan is an art form of sorts I used to find a perfect bannock tilting rock now I just use that Ray Mears guys stick method it is less stable but it saves a lot of time searching for a rock.

    Bannock on Cocagne Island for an 8pm snack


    Bannock and corn on Caledonia Mountain for a very late supper
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  18. #18
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    Default My curry recipie

    I love curry but unfortunately I am allergic to tomato which seriously limits my choice - so I have developed the following recipie. This will need the ability to fry off meat so a good powerful stove or fire.

    Put some oil in a good size pan and heat, add to this curry powder to taste - either bought or your own blend, as hot as you like. Cook gently untill it froths up. Add diced chicken, stir into the oil/curry powder mix and fry off for a few minutes untill it has taken some colour. Remove the pan from the heat and then add a good big spoonfull of mango chutney and half a block of creamed coconut along with some water (at home one block of coconut is sufficient for a curry for six using six chicken breasts). Simmer untill the liquid thickens up - the coconut does this - and the chicken is cooked through.

    This is dead simple and produces korma - esque curry. Obviously could be varied to a vegitarian option or using other meats. The key ingrediient is the creamed cocount which thickens the sauce, a tin of coconut milk can be used but will not have the same thickening effect. ( as a side issue, coconut milk on muesli for breakfast - delicious)

    To go with it - I use Ciabbatta bread mix to make naan bread- 500g packet froom Tescos is about 70 pence and this gives a nice light bread. Mix with water, allow to rise then divide into six, roll or stretch out into flat oval shapes and cook by either grilling, using a skillet/ pan or slap them onto a rock facing the fire. I like them very well done.

    Storming meal for six for about £5 and 30 minutes work. There won't be any left!

  19. #19

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    Wipe drool of desk

    Quote Originally Posted by The Viking
    I love curry but unfortunately I am allergic to tomato which seriously limits my choice - so I have developed the following recipie. This will need the ability to fry off meat so a good powerful stove or fire.

    Put some oil in a good size pan and heat, add to this curry powder to taste - either bought or your own blend, as hot as you like. Cook gently untill it froths up. Add diced chicken, stir into the oil/curry powder mix and fry off for a few minutes untill it has taken some colour. Remove the pan from the heat and then add a good big spoonfull of mango chutney and half a block of creamed coconut along with some water (at home one block of coconut is sufficient for a curry for six using six chicken breasts). Simmer untill the liquid thickens up - the coconut does this - and the chicken is cooked through.

    This is dead simple and produces korma - esque curry. Obviously could be varied to a vegitarian option or using other meats. The key ingrediient is the creamed cocount which thickens the sauce, a tin of coconut milk can be used but will not have the same thickening effect. ( as a side issue, coconut milk on muesli for breakfast - delicious)

    To go with it - I use Ciabbatta bread mix to make naan bread- 500g packet froom Tescos is about 70 pence and this gives a nice light bread. Mix with water, allow to rise then divide into six, roll or stretch out into flat oval shapes and cook by either grilling, using a skillet/ pan or slap them onto a rock facing the fire. I like them very well done.

    Storming meal for six for about £5 and 30 minutes work. There won't be any left!


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  20. #20
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    Default

    Oops sorry forgot one ingredient - cream or creme freche which gives it body. I use creme freche at home (less fat) and tinned cream if outdoors (lots of fat but more convenient).

  21. #21

    Default A bit of luxury (but cheap)

    First off I have not done this one in the field but I would have thought it would work on an overnighter an is very, very simple.

    Smoked Salmon an 'Caviar' Tagliatelle

    cook the tagliatelle but under cook it.
    In the drained pan add a carton on whipping cream or whipping elmlea (which is less likely to go off) and boil till it froths.
    Add a packet of chopped up smoked salmon trim (minus some for the garnish), you know the off cuts that cost about a quid and beat till makes a creamy sauce.
    Re-add the tagliatelle and stir it into the creamy salmon sauce.
    Serve and garnish with the reserved salmon maybe a drizzle sour cream and a good teaspoon of black 'caviar', well I am not a Rockefeller or a Gates so for 'caviar' read lumpfish roe (Ikea food shop sell the cheapest around me and it is only just over £1 last time I got some).

    Do not add any seasoning as the salty 'caviar' is all you need IMHO.

    Next eat quick, quick, quick before it goes cold.

    If you don't mind the ques at Ikea or duck in through the exit like I do it can actually be a cheap meal as with a 10 floz carton of whipping cream and a 50g jar of 'caviar' plus the salmon it trim will easily make enough sauce to coat enough pasta for 3 hungry paddlers.

    Edit: One last thought, you must use whipping cream as it will not split when boiled like other the other creams.
    Last edited by clcuckow; 1st-August-2006 at 07:51 PM.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  22. #22
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    Lloyd's Bannock
    • 2 parts multigrain flour.
    • 2 parts powdered skim milk.
    • 1 part demerrera sugar.
    • Lot of raisins.
    • Some baking powder.
    • Add small amounts of water and mix until dough like.
    • Heat olive oil and mash into pan.
    • Tilt the frying pan on a stick so that the dough is facing the coals in the fire testing occasionally for consistency.
    • The bottom may scorch a bit, but will still be tasty.
    • Cook until done.
    It worked well, sort of http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ead.php?t=1307

    Thanks Lloyd.
    Last edited by Chrish; 31st-May-2007 at 10:17 PM. Reason: Fixing quotes
    Leone_blanco

  23. #23

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    Mango chutney.

    The J's restaurants at Sainsbury's usually have sealed tubs of Patak's Mango Chutney as a free condiment. You might decides you want one but then change your mind but then redirect to your pocket... if you know what I mean.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Viking
    I love curry but unfortunately I am allergic to tomato which seriously limits my choice - so I have developed the following recipie. This will need the ability to fry off meat so a good powerful stove or fire.

    Put some oil in a good size pan and heat, add to this curry powder to taste - either bought or your own blend, as hot as you like. Cook gently untill it froths up. Add diced chicken, stir into the oil/curry powder mix and fry off for a few minutes untill it has taken some colour. Remove the pan from the heat and then add a good big spoonfull of mango chutney and half a block of creamed coconut along with some water (at home one block of coconut is sufficient for a curry for six using six chicken breasts). Simmer untill the liquid thickens up - the coconut does this - and the chicken is cooked through.

    This is dead simple and produces korma - esque curry. Obviously could be varied to a vegitarian option or using other meats. The key ingrediient is the creamed cocount which thickens the sauce, a tin of coconut milk can be used but will not have the same thickening effect. ( as a side issue, coconut milk on muesli for breakfast - delicious)

    To go with it - I use Ciabbatta bread mix to make naan bread- 500g packet froom Tescos is about 70 pence and this gives a nice light bread. Mix with water, allow to rise then divide into six, roll or stretch out into flat oval shapes and cook by either grilling, using a skillet/ pan or slap them onto a rock facing the fire. I like them very well done.

    Storming meal for six for about £5 and 30 minutes work. There won't be any left!


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  24. #24

    Default

    AAAAH Viking stop now!!!!
    mmm where's my pans!!!!!!!!

  25. #25
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    Default Soldier Bread

    Angela and I got some of this stuff for a week long vacation a few years ago. It is the heaviest bread I have ever tried. At the end of the week we still had some left to bring home. It is sort of like eating bread, but it is so filling that a small piece, with some water, will tie you over for hours. I just found the recipe again tonight. You just wrap it in a cloth and keep it dry and you are good to go...it keeps for a week or more.

    Soldier's Bread One of the most often used recipes in Louisbourg in the 18th century was that for "Soldier's Bread".

    Ingredients:
    6 cups lukewarm water
    2 tbsp. dry yeast
    2 tbsp. salt
    16-18 cups flour - approx. 4 cups stone-ground rye flour and 12 cups stone-ground whole wheat flour.

    Method:

    1.) - In a large bowl mix together:

    6 cups water
    2 tbsp. dry yeast
    6-8 cups flour
    Beat for at least 100 strokes.
    Cover and let rise for ½ hour.

    2.) - Beat down and fold in 2 tbsp. salt. Add remaining flour, 1 cup at a time, until dough comes away from the sides of bowl. Turn out on floured surface and knead until smooth, at least 15 minutes. Use additional flour if necessary.

    3.) - Place in greased bowl, turn dough so that entire surface is oiled. Cover and place in draft-free area. Allow to rise until double in bulk.

    4.) - Punch down and allow to rise again in the same manner.

    5.) - Turn dough out on floured surface, knead 4-5 minutes. Divide into 4 equal portions, shape in rounds and place on greased cookie sheets, 3-4 inches apart. Allow to rise 20-30 minutes.

    6.) - Bake in pre-heated oven at 400 ºF for 20 minutes; reduce heat to 350 ºF and continue to bake for 45 minutes, or until done.

    Bread was considered as one of the most important parts of the 18th century diet. It was made with four main ingredients: flour, salt, water, and a leavening agent. The most common types of flour were wheat and rye; however, they were often combined with other flours including barley, oats, peas, and vetch. There was white flour used in breadmaking, but loaves made with this flour of noticeably higher quality was reserved for the master baker and the more elite patrons of Louisbourg. Although bread was baked in brick ovens in the 18th century, this recipe has been modified to meet modern baking standards.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  26. #26

    Default

    This a definitely an alcohol induced one since | have just got the munchies:

    1 220g can baked beans (aka the small POA one)
    1 180'ish can tuna
    1 tablespoon cheese sauce granules
    garlic salt (I used quite a bit!) and pepper to taste.

    Method:

    shove everything in a pan and mix a bit and heat till cooked.
    don't forget about it.
    or fall a sleep to be greeted by something that you could probably ignite with your fire steel


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  27. #27
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    Default Bannock Pizza?

    I thought of this (by accident) after making some campfire bannock at my brothers house on Sunday night, I will give it a try soon;
    • Make some Bannock
    • fry up some mushrooms, canned meat, salami, polish coil, or whatever, with some peppers and tomatos etc.
    • add some pizza sauce, BBQ sauce, HP sauce, ketchup or whatever to the top of the bannock
    • add the fried stuff
    • add cheese
    • sit by the fire until the cheese melts
    • eat with you favorite pint (or with drink crystals if you are out quite a ways)
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  28. #28
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    Default Lloyd's Bannock- I tried it!

    Hiya folks,

    got bored with my dyking today and decided a treat was in order so I tried out Lloyds bannock recipe!

    Fantastic it is too , another welcome addition to the outdoor kitchen! cheers mate!

    Woodsmoke
    Expand your mind there's plenty space for it...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Angela and I got some of this stuff for a week long vacation a few years ago. It is the heaviest bread I have ever tried. At the end of the week we still had some left to bring home. It is sort of like eating bread, but it is so filling that a small piece, with some water, will tie you over for hours. I just found the recipe again tonight. You just wrap it in a cloth and keep it dry and you are good to go...it keeps for a week or more.

    Soldier's Bread One of the most often used recipes in Louisbourg in the 18th century was that for "Soldier's Bread".

    Ingredients:
    6 cups lukewarm water
    2 tbsp. dry yeast
    2 tbsp. salt
    16-18 cups flour - approx. 4 cups stone-ground rye flour and 12 cups stone-ground whole wheat flour.

    Method:

    1.) - In a large bowl mix together:

    6 cups water
    2 tbsp. dry yeast
    6-8 cups flour
    Beat for at least 100 strokes.
    Cover and let rise for ½ hour.

    2.) - Beat down and fold in 2 tbsp. salt. Add remaining flour, 1 cup at a time, until dough comes away from the sides of bowl. Turn out on floured surface and knead until smooth, at least 15 minutes. Use additional flour if necessary.

    3.) - Place in greased bowl, turn dough so that entire surface is oiled. Cover and place in draft-free area. Allow to rise until double in bulk.

    4.) - Punch down and allow to rise again in the same manner.

    5.) - Turn dough out on floured surface, knead 4-5 minutes. Divide into 4 equal portions, shape in rounds and place on greased cookie sheets, 3-4 inches apart. Allow to rise 20-30 minutes.

    6.) - Bake in pre-heated oven at 400 ºF for 20 minutes; reduce heat to 350 ºF and continue to bake for 45 minutes, or until done.

    Bread was considered as one of the most important parts of the 18th century diet. It was made with four main ingredients: flour, salt, water, and a leavening agent. The most common types of flour were wheat and rye; however, they were often combined with other flours including barley, oats, peas, and vetch. There was white flour used in breadmaking, but loaves made with this flour of noticeably higher quality was reserved for the master baker and the more elite patrons of Louisbourg. Although bread was baked in brick ovens in the 18th century, this recipe has been modified to meet modern baking standards.
    Wow, you took the words right out of my keyboard!!!! I live in Louisbourg and have had that bread many times while visiting the Louisbourg Fortress. http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/ns/louisbourg/index_e.asp

    Heavy and filling are the two word that come immediately to mind.
    Last edited by Bigblue; 10th-August-2006 at 12:09 AM.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigblue View Post
    Wow, you took the words right out of my keyboard!!!! I live in Louisbourg and have had that bread meny time while visiting the Louisbourg Fortress. http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/ns/louisbourg/index_e.asp

    Heavy and filling are the two word that come immediately to mind.
    ...and if you put it in a pillow case or stuff sack it becomes a mace like weapon to fend off bears. Also makes a lovely sea anchor and can be used to tie down tents on windy days.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  31. #31
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    Thumbs up Thanks!

    Hi All,

    Just back from our trip - thanks for all your great suggestions!

    We didn't have time to try many recipes (also, obtaining Pheasant or Ground Buffalo proved a bit tricky in Stromness!). However, we did try out LAS's stir-fry, and MM's Pasta Carbonara - can thoroughly recommend either as great camping nosh .

    For the Carbonara we managed to get hold of some fresh pasta which hardly needs any cooking - bring to the boil and then set aside hot whilst you do the sauce. Give it another blast at the end, and you're sorted.

    Another success was an 'Old El Paso' Fahjita kit. Dead easy to make up the sauce, then just spoon some mix onto a tortilla (steam these first over a frying pan with a splash of water), add some lettuce and cheese, and you've got a real feast.

    A great tip for cooking on the Whisperlite - we bought a simmer ring off Ebay for a couple of quid. This is what your granny used to use to boil milk on a gas stove without scorching. Simply put, if you have a Whisperlite or similar, buy one of these now!



    Naturally, it didn't stay this shiny for long , but it's great for any time you need a low heat setting (e.g. simmering or frying). More info and a full review of the Whisperlite coming soon.......

    Thanks for all your recipe suggestions - do keep them coming!

    Blutack.
    The Canoeist's prayer: "Lord grant me the serenity to walk the portages I must, The courage to run the rapids I can, And the wisdom to know the difference".

    John Muir Trust - Wild Places for Nature & People.

  32. #32

    Default Chinese Dumplings

    I do a far bit of dehydration in the oven and recently did some crispy bacon by frying off some asda value bacon pieces the drying them over night in a 60C oven.

    For the Chinese Dumplings I made up some standard dumpling mix.

    1 part beef suet
    2 part self raising flour
    salt

    next I chopped up the dried bacon to make it easier to rehydrate added some honey and seasoned with Chinese five spice.

    While the bacon was doing its stuff add some water to the dumpling mix and make the suet pastry.

    Next take a walnut sized piece of the pastry and flatten to about half an inch. Add some of the 'Chinese bacon' in the middle and fold the edges into the middle to make the stuffed dumplings.

    These dumpling can either be steamed or dropped into salted boiling water for a few minutes (they are done when they float to the surface).

    I would obviously be better with fresh ingredients for maybe chopped up canned char siu pork.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  33. #33

    Default Foragers Food : Braised Chestnuts

    I found a load of sweet chestnuts at the weekend and thought that I would try something other than just roasting/exploding them.

    I based it on an Internet recipe that I can no longer find but did to versions. Posh (aka in the kitchen) and field (aka in the garden). The results were very similar.

    The start is the same.

    To peel, cut a cross just through the shell on the flat side and boil them for about ten mins then peel of the shells trying to get all of the furry inner layer. If you cannot get it all off don't worry as you are going to boil them again and they should drop off or certainly be able to peel them off easier when they are fully cooked.

    Posh
    • Fry off some finely chopped shallots in a little oil (I used peanut with a little sesame to keep with the nut theme).
    • Deglaze with port.
    • Add the chestnuts and cover with chicken stock the stripped leaves from a couple of sprigs of thyme (the stems past it at this time of year).
    • Salt and Pepper to taste.
    • Cover and simmer for about an hour or until the chestnuts are cooked.
    • Strain, wash and peel off any left over inner layer.
    • They are wonderful hot or cold and are much better than salted peanuts with a nice ice cold Fino!
    Field
    • Rehydrate some dried onion with boiling water, drain reserving the stock.
    • Fry the onions until they start to brown.
    • Add the onion stock back, thyme leaves (well I was in the garden and that was were I got the thyme for the posh version ) a chicken stock cube.
    • When the stock cube has dissolved add the chestnuts and top up with water.
    • Cover and simmer for about an hour or until the chestnuts are cooked.
    • Strain wash and peel off any left over inner layer.
    • You just cannot eat one!
    Some of them will probably drop or don't look as good so what I did was crushed them (from both batch's) with butter do make some chestnut butter which is great on toasted bread or bannock.

    Hope you like them as much as I did.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  34. #34
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    Default Rubaboo and Bannock

    My youngest son, Tim, and I paddled up river, early this morning, to get some ash. It is snowing today, and the wind is gusting up to 30 mph. Kind of a tough haul and we got pretty damp and cold. When we got to the ash, and got the log cut, we set up a fire and made rubaboo.

    Far as I can tell, rubaboo is not a specific food, but rather a type of food, a soup thickened with hard tack dumplings, or a thick meat sauce.

    Our favorite rubaboo recipe:

    Fry up a half pound of bacon in a one and a half gallon kettle.

    Add water to 3/4 ehight of the kettle

    Add one pound split peas and two cloves

    Cook until you can't make out individual peas.

    Serves six (or two if you're cold and hungry).

    Goes well with bannock
    *******************
    PG Bannock:

    Four cups flour
    One Tablespoon baking powder
    Three big pinches of salt
    One Tablespoon sugar
    One handful of raisins
    One cup, and a bit (about a Tablespoon), of water.
    Three or four Tablespoons of bacon grease or cooking oil

    Mix dry ingredients, add raisins
    Add raisins, and mix them in good
    Add cup of water, and knead for ten minutes
    Add extra Tablespoon of water only if needed (you want a fairly dry mix)
    Pull of piieces and make patties the size of your frying pan - about 1/2 inch thick.

    Bake in tin plate set at 45 degree angle to your fire. Exposed face bakes first - so you can see how it's doing. Keep rotating plate so grease covers back side of bannock and bannock face bakes evenly. Turn when golden brown. Fire should be very low heat.

    PG

  35. #35
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    I was in George Fishers in Keswick last weekend and saw a lovely little book (stocking filler sized) called something like "the campers cookbook" I'm sure if you rang them (01768772178) they would tell you more about it.
    Once you know the name of the book you could either order it from them or google it and get it nearer to yourself (If you were that way inclined)
    The book had some great reciepes that could be easly chucked together (not sure if I like the sould of Bannana Omlettes though!)
    Jonesy.

  36. #36

    Default Backwoods Huevos Rancheros

    Backwoods Huevos Rancheros

    This dish was inspired by the lions eggs advert a few years ago but modified for backwoods/the stuff from my dehydrator and makes a great fast breakfast.

    It starts when I dry peppers and onions. I start by skinning Red, Green, Orange, Yellow peppers and red onions then slicing in half (e.g. demi circles of veg.) then drying them either in a dehydrator (mine is one of those cheapo QVC one) or the oven.

    I then in mix about 2 or 3 part of these mixed pepper mix with 1 part of the red onions and keep them in a sealed zip lock bag till I need them.

    In the field I dehydrate the mix in water. It needs about 20 mins. but I usually leave them over knight in a billy.

    Next I squeeze out the pepper/onion mix preserving the liquor (see later, to see if you do ). In a mess tin and a little fat or oil fry the peppers and onion until your liking and season to taste. Remember that they are already ‘cooked’ and if you have been watching have been watching, Heston Blumenthal : in Search of perfection you know that you never cook in an oven than gets hotter than a dehydrator unless you are cooking pizza 24 hours at 50C for a steak, how mad it that!

    Make a hole in the middle for the egg. You can us a reconstituted powdered egg if you really, really have to but it is far better with a fresh egg. Anyway I have got one of those ‘armoured’ plastic egg boxes (if I can find small enough eggs to fit it) so I crack the egg and plop it into hole and fry it till cooked how you like it.

    I normally eat it straight from the mess tin.

    Now I know that you are all asking, what am I going to do with the peppery onioney liquor. Well I must admit that that the most times that I have decided to start this recipe for the morning is at night and at home when I am one over the eight and slightly chemically inconvenienced. On one such morning after the night before I got it into my head that I needed a ‘pick-me-up’ and I have never been able to take a Prairie Oyster so what I did was heat up the liquor and with some water and spoon in a teaspoon Marmite/Bovril for a ‘beefy’, peppery hot drink! In the great out doors I just carry those small individual pots that you get it places like express by holiday inn’s and some how end up in your pocket after breakfast
    Last edited by clcuckow; 6th-December-2006 at 09:50 PM.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  37. #37
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    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
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    OT again, but what are Lions eggs ?
    (Ignoring the fact that they bear live young of course ).

  38. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork View Post
    OT again, but what are Lions eggs ?
    (Ignoring the fact that they bear live young of course ).
    The British Egg Industry Council

    you now the ones that print the red lions on the eggs as a quality mark.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  39. #39
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    Ah, I see, thanks for the clarification (I'm vegan, so I don't have anything to do with eggs y'see ...).
    (Only a quick detour from me too this time).


  40. #40

    Default

    basic lentil soup
    idealy this one needs a fire for best results as the longer you simmer it the better, although it's edible as soon as the lentils are soft.

    ingredients
    1l ham stock (i cheat and use a couple of ham stock cubes)
    1 cup of red split lentils
    handful of dried onions


    rinse the lentils, and boil rapidly for 5 mins stirring to prevent sticking.
    add the onions and simmer for a further 15 mins.

    serve with oatcakes.


    chorizo and cous-cous

    ingredients
    cous-cous
    1/2 a large onion or 1 small onion (may be substituted for re-hydrated onion)
    chicken stock cube
    tomato puree
    garlic puree
    chorizo
    oil

    method

    boil up some water and add to the cous cous. add ther stock cube and put to one side to cook.


    cut the chorizo into 1/2" slices and quarter.
    fry off the onions until soft with a little garlic.
    add the chorizo and fry gently.
    add some tomato puree and a little water.
    now remove from the heat and stir in the cous-cous

    i'll add more as i remember them.

  41. #41
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    Dough-bouys (dumplings)

    2 cups Suet
    1 cup plain flour
    pinch of salt
    pinch of mixed herbs (or any other herbs you like)
    Garlic (if you want)

    1. Throw all the ingredients into a pot and mix together.
    2. Whilst mixing add a little water (a drop at a time) until mixture is really sticky and doughey.
    3. Flour your hands and shape the dough into golf ball sized lumps.
    4. Drop them into your stew and cook for 20 mins or until they have roughly doubled in size.

    This recipe was shown to me by my late mother. No idea where it originally came from.

  42. #42

    Default ambrosia

    mix yoghurt, cream, marshmellows, smarties and anything else you fancy. Leave for a while to let the flavours mix. Eat it with friends. YUM...

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris View Post
    mix yoghurt, cream, marshmellows, smarties and anything else you fancy. Leave for a while to let the flavours mix. Eat it with friends. YUM...
    Are you serious? it sounds vile, and I've been known to eat some rubbish, oh well each to their own!
    Leone_blanco

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247 View Post
    Are you serious? it sounds vile, and I've been known to eat some rubbish, oh well each to their own!
    I tend to stay away from a lot of foods too; like French ragout,
    Or olio that wad staw a sow,
    Or fricassee wad mak her spew
    Wi' perfect sconner,
    Looks down wi' sneering, scornfu' view
    On sic a dinner?

    ...But mark the Rustic, haggis fed...

    It's almost that time of year again!
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  45. #45
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    Ok im a 23 year old who has never cooked anything by himself befor. well untill now!

    I thaught i'd have a go at the bannock as even though i saw it here i didnt realise it was as simple as everyone has indeed made out, infact it was watching Mr Mears 'canoe journey' episode from bushcraft that actually prompted me to get on and try it

    anyway i gave it ago in the kitchen first as i thaught i better not run out to the woods and have my first go at genuine cooking. I used fresh milk and egg as well instead of the powdered stuff. Anyway for a first attempt im pleased to say - SUCCESS!!!

    so far no casualties from my cooking and it is actually edable, though my mum said it was a bit sweet for her liking.

    Next step, doing it outdoors and learning not to make such a mess when doing it

  46. #46
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    Just back from a two day trip and remembered to bring a Haggis with me. Simmered for a little over an hour on an open fire then eaten with mashed potatoes. Lovely. Must bring turnips next time
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

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    It's just nae haggis without the neeps.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  48. #48
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    Default

    Slice a banana lengthwise, cutting through one side of the skin only.
    Stuff with as much good dark chocolate as you can fit in, fill up the gaps with whiskey(!). Wrap in tin foil chuck it in the fire for a bit, eat. YUM

  49. #49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keef View Post
    Slice a banana lengthwise, cutting through one side of the skin only.
    Stuff with as much good dark chocolate as you can fit in, fill up the gaps with whiskey(!). Wrap in tin foil chuck it in the fire for a bit, eat. YUM
    We use this one regularly but with a Flake. Double YUM!!! I'll need to try it with the whiskey - remembering not to give that one to the kids !!!
    Chris


  50. #50

    Default Ps

    Like the website, especially the bikes. I sold mine 5 years ago to help finance a boat , but there is one coming on the horizon .
    Chris


  51. #51
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    Default

    even better peel the banana and cut lenght ways and fill with Mars bar, clotted cream and whiskey. Then wrap in tin foil and bake on a BBQ / embers.

  52. #52
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    It's not a 'recipe' as such but my favourite camp food is:

    Take a trout, clean, nob of butter inside, smear with butter outside, splash with lemon juice. Wrap securely in alu foil and stick in the embers of a camp fire for 15 to 20 minutes.

    Eat with fingers and accompany with a nice whiskey!

    Matt

  53. #53
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    Default

    We did a Smallmouth Bass by rolling it in egg coating it in pancake mix and frying it in butter last summer. It was better than fish and Chips pub style. Of course I had been out there a week or so...
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  54. #54
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    Default Best Fry Bread Yet

    For Thanksgiving and again at Christmas, we had a group of guys from Teen Challenge, a drug rehab, over for a feed. Duane, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake, was among them. Turns out his mother's maiden name is Morris - same as my mother's maiden name. Still checking to see if we're related.

    We tried out his fry bread recipe and it was the best yet.

    Recipe,

    Morris Fry Bread:

    Three cups white flour
    1 tsp baking powder
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 Tbsp powdered sugar
    1/2 or 1/3 cup powdered milk
    Mix dry ingredients

    Add water (about 1 cup) and one egg. There is no predetermined amount of water. Dough should be smooth, but not dry or sticky. Dough should not be clumpy or lumpy. Mix with HANDS, no spoons, wisks or electric mixers. Flour can be added if you have mixed in too much water.

    You can also add brown sugar and cinnamon - or
    raspberries or blueberries

    Let sit at room temp for two or three hours - do not refrigerate

    Pull out handfulls of preferred size (about golf ball sized works best for most applications). Make into a ball and pull outwards from center to flatten. DO NOT USE A ROLLING PIN!

    You can deep fry or fry in a pan (deep frying works best). Use enough oil or lard to fry properly on a low heat (hot coals if over a fire) Fry to golden or dark brown. Make sure fry bread is not doughy in middle.

    Serve hot. Do not refrigerate bread even after cooking.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  55. #55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blutack View Post
    Finally we have a holiday booked - really looking forward to it. What I'm not looking forward to is our typical camping menu, which alternates between Pasta 'n' Sauce, Sweet 'n' Sour, and the cop out of Fish 'n' Chips!

    This is therefore a cry for help! What's your favourite al fresco meal for two, and how do you cook it?

    Our stove is a single-ring petrol burner (whisperlite), and our cooking gear consists of a 2 litre pot, a 1.5 litre pot, and a lid that doubles as a frying pan:



    Looking forward to all your mouthwatering suggestions!

    Blutack.
    Are you restricted by the weight to what you can carry? Cans (tins)? Bottles? In the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and Quetico Provincial Park (North America), we're restricted -- no cans (tins), no glass bottles, and of course the weight of what we can carry on portages.

    One thing we liked for our first night camping (we could carry fresh meat), was chicken breasts pounded thin, stuffed with a cream cheese combination (brie works nicely as do other soft cheeses), breaded with a crumb mixture of your choice, and sautéed over the little stove. Yours sounds much like what we use.

  56. #56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by woodsmoke View Post
    I have the same stove...

    I belted a pheasant on the way to a trip once and cut the breasts off with a very sharp opinel. When out camping I fried a finely chopped onion, added the breast of pheasant and tried to cook it as slow as u could on a whisperlight, I then added red wine and loads of raspberrys and blaeberrys (fresh picked) and let it simmer. With the other pan I made some onion flavboured mash (with wood sorrell added for a wee zing) as a bed for the pheasant and sauce.

    By the gods I felt Herne couldn't have made a better meal himself!
    Major YUMMM!!! Can I go with you on your next trip?

  57. #57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keef View Post
    Slice a banana lengthwise, cutting through one side of the skin only.
    Stuff with as much good dark chocolate as you can fit in, fill up the gaps with whiskey(!). Wrap in tin foil chuck it in the fire for a bit, eat. YUM
    Sounds great! Except that I'd leave out the banana (can't stand bananas).

  58. #58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    We did a Smallmouth Bass by rolling it in egg coating it in pancake mix and frying it in butter last summer. It was better than fish and Chips pub style. Of course I had been out there a week or so...
    Sounds like a favorite dish of ours in the BWCA. Except the fish is what we call a wall-eye (or wall-eyed pike). I think actually it's a pickerel, but it's truly a lovely fish, fried absolutely fresh in butter, and served with fry bread and cooked dried apricots. (I cook them, then shortly before they're quite done, throw in a small handful of little marshmallows. When they're cold, they're much like a marmalade.)

    Wonderful breakfast.

    BTW, it's been terrific reading how you all do the food in the wild. We quit using campfires on our first Quetico trip. (It was very dry, and campfires were forbidden. So we used our little butane stove (can't call the brand at the moment, but I found it more adaptable for good cooking than the WhisperLite, and the weight, fuel and all for each, was about the same.) After that, we pretty much quit using a campfire at all -- stuff stayed so much cleaner!

  59. #59
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    Default I just got a cracking little book for my B.day!!

    I mentioned earlier in this thread that I had see a book all about camping recipes.
    Well our Dorris got it me for my Birthday a week or two back!
    Horray
    Its called
    "The Campfire Cookbook"
    a handbook for hungry campers and hikers.
    by Don and Pam Philpott

    I'm sure Amazon or somebody like that will have it if not try
    www.chrysalisbooks.co.uk
    Sorry if anybody has already posted this information.
    Its amazing what you can make with berries, moss, nettles and sheep poo, Yummy!!
    The early bird may catch the worm, but it's always the second mouse that gets the cheese!

  60. #60

    Default Some Wild Additions to Your Supper - Ramsons

    At this time of year in woodlands, these almost overpoweringly, garlic smelling members of the onion family (spear shaped leaves with a white flower) don't taste as strong as they smell. I picked a back pocket full this evening on my dog's run. (why did no one stop and talk? ) I added this (thinly shredded) right at the end of cooking a chicken satay and it tasted awsome. You can also add it raw to salads and it is yummo. Get in quick before the season's out.
    Just add wheat, barley, hops and a boat.

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