Results 1 to 28 of 28

Thread: Close encouter of the wild kind!

  1. #1

    Default Close encouter of the wild kind!


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    16,903
    Journal Entries
    2

    Default

    Tough to imagine from this side of the pond. Of course I have loved all my dogs dearly but if it was someone else's dog I would hope that the bear was not that hungry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Kent, England
    Posts
    557

    Default

    When I paddle in Northern Canada I carry a flare known as a bear scarer! It is a small (pen size) launcher that fires an explosive flare. The theory is that the loud bang makes the bear run away. It does work, but in 1995 I fired one at a grizzly but the bang went off behind the bear sending it straight at me at full tilt. I was frozen with fear!!

    Fortunately the bear ran straight past me and into the woods!

    The government of NWT run a free bear awareness course for people who are going into the backwoods. I did one in Yellowknife in 97.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    This type of thing is not as uncommon as you may think. I few years ago a man from British Columbia was attacked by a mountain lion and stabbed it to death with a folding lockblade. When I was about 25 I encountered a bear on horseback who was intent on having some lunch. The first thing we did was charge at the bear to confuse it a bit and then stratigically withdrew in the opposite direction at a high rate of speed. She was a damn good horse that wasn't afraid of anything.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
    Posts
    16,903
    Journal Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan
    I encountered a bear on horseback


    Now that would be scary

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Angus, Scotland
    Posts
    2,884
    Journal Entries
    5

    Default

    Only time I've ever encountered a black bear up close ie; less than 2 meters away was camping in Yosemite National park california.

    It was just after we has gone to bed for the night and I heard a snuffling noise right outside, the bear had its head inside my rucsack (which was empty). I carefully climbed out my sleeping bag unzipped the tent and started shouting at the top of my voice and ran at it, the image of a naked mad woman rushing at it obviously scared the thing half to death and it turned and legged it. Don't know what i'd have done if it hadn't .
    'There is no wealth but life itself.'

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    The "My Canadian Canoe Routes" forum is talking about this quite a bit now. They have some interesting ideas about how to keep it from happening to them, Especially the gun nuts. The best has to be the bear self defence course instructor. I knew there was a reason I came to a more civilized forum. If you are looking for a laugh (or if you want to be disturbed) have a look.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chesham in Bucks.
    Posts
    1,320

    Default

    Wow. That sword you can insert into a pole/paddle to make a spear defies belief Are there any countries where that sort of thing is legal?
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  9. #9
    monkey_pork's Avatar
    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    -
    Posts
    4,856

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan
    If you are looking for a laugh (or if you want to be disturbed) have a look.
    Thanks for the warning !

    I found this bit funny. I kinda know what the poster means, but it was still amusing.
    I love string
    I'm going back for more of a read later, but from what I've read so far, they do seem keen on water filtration on that board...

    No idea what I'd have done here, are bears predictable, or fairly random creatures - I'm guessing fairly predictable, so I guess one can acquire an awareness of what they are like and act on that training.

    The only time I've ever encountered a wild animal attack threat was when trying to move an injured badger. He attacked the stick I had in my hand with such ferocity, that my respect for the little creature expanded enormously in an instant, so I can't imagine what a bear would be like.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    In the US you can own an automatic rifle if you want. Here in Canada the average guy cannot, but when it comes to knives and edged weapons you are allowed to have pretty much anything except a switchblade or spring assisted knife. Mind you, you cannot conceal them on yourself and walk around town. The police are OK with a guy with a sword strapped on him walking to the medieval faire because they can see what it is and where it is; but short cut through a shopping mall and you will get questioned. Take a smaller blade and hide it on you body and that is a crime; the police do not like surprises. A lot of it is discretionary; I have gone to samurai sword class where the teacher was a police officer; no problems, just a short walk across the street from the car park, but I wouldn't try to do my banking after class. The concealable spear thing would be fine to carry down the street in spear form as everyone can see (and avoid) you, although if you did not have a good reason to do so you would raise some eyebrows. Packed away in tube form it would be illegal to carry. It looks like mail order junk anyhow, the best bear defense is a good pot of hot water, an axe, what ever knife you own, a rock in a sock, a good loud scary yell, etc. Those that survive a bear attack have presence of mind and use the first thing that comes to hand as a weapon. Those that don’t survive are sometimes trying to put their break down shotgun together or get to another weapon when the bear is inside their reactionary gap. When Smokey decides that you are lunch there is rarely time to decide; ‘should I use the Grohmann knife or the Ka-Bar? No I think I will use the Sykes Fairbairn’. Tool selection is best left to the golf course which is about as far into the wilderness as some people should go.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork
    are bears predictable, or fairly random creatures - I'm guessing fairly predictable, so I guess one can acquire an awareness of what they are like and act on that training.

    The only time I've ever encountered a wild animal attack threat was when trying to move an injured badger. He attacked the stick I had in my hand with such ferocity, that my respect for the little creature expanded enormously in an instant, so I can't imagine what a bear would be like.
    There are a few kinds of bears;
    • Wild never seen humans - the most unpredictable, usually they see you and you don't see them the cause of most fatal attacks oddly enough
    • Wild used to seeing humans - fairly predictable and not afraid of you probably scavenging a living on the fringes of town
    • Wild but fed by humans - Not afraid of you and will trash your camp, may not see you as food but know you are a source of food
    • Polar bears - Will hunt and eat you without question
    All in all I would still rather face a bear than a badger though
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  12. #12
    monkey_pork's Avatar
    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    -
    Posts
    4,856

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan
    There are a few kinds of bears;
    • Polar bears - Will hunt and eat you without question
    All in all I would still rather face a bear than a badger though
    Ah, thanks, I can see how those distinctions would occur.

    What's a polar bear get upto, around 400kg or something similar isn't it.
    At least you know you'll be eaten I guess.

    That badger was only a youngster, but I have absolutely no doubt that he'd have had a finger off me given the chance.

    That was an odd find that was, we were out walking on Ashprington Point, (which we often paddle past), and there in the middle of the filed, laying in a tractor tyre rut, in the wet, was a young badger, eyes closed, soaking wet with a non-threatening bite wound on his haunch - I suspect where he'd been encouraged out of his family home, once 'this' years litter had been born.

    Anyway, cutting a long story short, he wasn't dead (like I had first thought), and having set up some shelter for him, and calling the local wildlife rescue for advice on how to move him to where they could pick him up, he'd clearly recovered enough to decide that he didn't want to be moved. I gently tested his reaction with a stick before going near him, and he went for it - hissing and biting like a devil. Having got his strength back in the shelter we'd set up for him, he then raced off into the woods along the rivers edge, and went to ground. I left him an apple and some rice cakes, and that was that. I'd imagine that having gone to ground he'd have warmed up further, and then once rested - been about his business.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork
    What's a polar bear get upto, around 400kg or something similar isn't it.
    At least you know you'll be eaten I guess.
    Males go 500-600kg (1100-1300lbs) Females 300kg (650lbs) unless pregnant then they can weigh as much as a male.

    They have been known to attack US submarines in Canadian waters, our first line of defense.


    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Sussex.
    Posts
    3,240

    Default

    I have a friend that was chased by a polar bear. He was paddling a sea kayak. The bear nearly swam faster than he could paddle. I think it was in Hudson bay. It was some time ago.

    I had a friend that was eaten by a Nile crock. he wasnt paddling though.

  15. #15
    monkey_pork's Avatar
    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    -
    Posts
    4,856

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan
    Males go 500-600kg (1100-1300lbs) Females 300kg (650lbs) unless pregnant then they can weigh as much as a male.

    They have been known to attack US submarines in Canadian waters, our first line of defense.
    Incredible - words fail me at this point (other than thanks for posting the pictures). What an absolutely awe inspiring beast - I had no idea they got quite that large.

    Wayne, I'm maybe not entirely too surprised about the speed in the water, they've got semi-webbed feet. Good job your pal wasn't in an open tho', he'd never have got away.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    I think it is dangerous to be Waynes friend, I was attacked by an ostrich at the zoo once but chased by a polar bear or eaten by a croc'... man, if we ever go paddling together I am bringing a police escort.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chesham in Bucks.
    Posts
    1,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork
    I I had no idea they got quite that large.
    Or so well trained (as in attacking the US submarines)
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chesham in Bucks.
    Posts
    1,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan
    ]All in all I would still rather face a bear than a badger though
    I'm really not to sure about this dealing with bears stuff, but badgers over here (UK) are completely harmless. Their number one strategy is staying well away from humans, number two is to run. If you *really* want to corner one and poke it with a stick you will find this quite difficult as they are really quite good at strategies 1 & 2, but should you succeed in leaving the badger no options at all you will find it is quite good at looking after itself
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Halifax, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,000

    Default

    I guess we all feel pretty safe in the UK with the lack of bears. However I did hear a rumour that their were plans to re-introduce wolves into the wild in Scotland . Does anyone know if their is any truth behind this?
    Leone_blanco

  20. #20

    Default

    There has been talk - an article about reintroduction of wolves and their impact can be found here.

    http://www.responsibletravel.com/Copy/Copy901051.htm

    H - x

  21. #21
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    Bear attacks have been on the rise lately. If you do a bear attack search on the CBC News website at the top of the thread you will get pages and pages of attacks. That said, car accident fatalities are more common. If anyone wants to see what bears do to humans that don't succesfully fight back, PM me; but I wont post the photo. This grizzly bear attack took place in Alaska and was discovered by authorities a few days later. The cases of true man eaters are quite rare but this case stuck with me. Recently they found a polar bear grizzly hybrid; their ranges overlap and they share enough DNA to successfully mate.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    3,753
    Journal Entries
    40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Bear attacks have been on the rise lately. If you do a bear attack search on the CBC News website at the top of the thread you will get pages and pages of attacks. That said, car accident fatalities are more common. If anyone wants to see what bears do to humans that don't succesfully fight back, PM me; but I wont post the photo. This grizzly bear attack took place in Alaska and was discovered by authorities a few days later. The cases of true man eaters are quite rare but this case stuck with me. Recently they found a polar bear grizzly hybrid; their ranges overlap and they share enough DNA to successfully mate.
    If they are the same photos - a friend from Alaska sent them to me a couple of years ago. Biggest damn bear anyone's ever seen. Wouldn't care to post them on the forum.

    We've had a lot more local attacks in the past several years. Scariest one, because I have kids, is the scout who was dragged out of the tent, in his sleeping bag, and the bear kept dragging the kid away with all the rest of the scouts and scoutmasters beating on the bear. Bear just wouldn't give it up and dragged the kid 300 yards before leaving off. Kid was o.k. This is not normal bear behavior.

    I do believe it is 15 or 20 years since we've had a fatality. That one was rather odd as there seemed to be no reason for the attack. It was also odd that it was big news in Minneapolis and Chicago papers but got almost no press locally.

    With black bear, unlike grizzly, it is best to fight if the bear attacks you. From reading local attacks, it seems like bear will go for the head or neck. An aquaintance kept cutting a bear with his hunting knife when it was going for his head. It finally clamped on to his leg and wouldn't let go. He was able to kill it with the knife after about an hour of stabbing it. I'm not sure this fits in with bear attacks as he'd shot the bear to begin with and done it so ineptly, that the bear attacked him.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    south doncaster
    Posts
    2,185

    Default

    how to avoid been eaten by a bear whilst paddling
    1 always paddle tandem
    2 wear running shoes
    3 choose a paddling companion who is a slower runner than you!!

  24. #24
    monkey_pork's Avatar
    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    -
    Posts
    4,856

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Recently they found a polar bear grizzly hybrid; their ranges overlap and they share enough DNA to successfully mate.
    Found, and then shot of course.
    Shot, for money.
    I do have a view about this, but I'll keep it out of the post.

    This hybrid bear has come up before on the odd occasion, although as far as I know, these have all been captive bears, not in the wild.

    I took this as a bad sign tho', Gizzly's have been seen to go into the Polar bears range, to scavenge, and possibly even to hunt seals on occasion, but to stay long enough to breed ?

    This hints at both species being marginalised by a decline in habitat, both pushed more out onto the fringes of their environment.

  25. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LAS247 View Post
    I guess we all feel pretty safe in the UK with the lack of bears. However I did hear a rumour that their were plans to re-introduce wolves into the wild in Scotland . Does anyone know if their is any truth behind this?
    given that the minister (barking Rhona) bottled the re-introduction of beavers we're hardly likely to see wolves or lynx anytime soon - there was an estate owner looking at creating a game reserve big enough to accomodate a pack of wolves a year or 2 ago not sure what progress if any he made....but that'd be fully fence and cover a couple 100 of 1000s of hectares....

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Sussex.
    Posts
    3,240

    Default

    Would you be able to fence a few 1000 acres of mountain and moor to allow your wolf pack to run free with current access regs.

    Not that I would want to lose our current access. i think it would be difficult to deprive the public access to a vast track of Scottish landscape to prevent wolf and human conflicts.

    Its a shame the beaver were not reintroduced.

    Bushcraft Survival and First Aid Training.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    6,971
    Journal Entries
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wayne View Post
    Its a shame the beaver were not reintroduced.

    Beavers are just about the best thing you can have in the environment. I never knew you had them in Europe until recently. I guess I respect them more than some people I meet.
    http://www.scotsbeavers.org/ Found this on a recent search. Interesting.
    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


  28. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    3,753
    Journal Entries
    40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Beavers are just about the best thing you can have in the environment. I never knew you had them in Europe until recently. I guess I respect them more than some people I meet.
    http://www.scotsbeavers.org/ Found this on a recent search. Interesting.
    Wish the US Forest Service felt the same way. We own a piece of land in Superior Nat'l Forest, on the border of the BWCA. My mother was born there. There was a dam placed on the property in 1890 by the Schroeder Lumber Company to sluice logs out to Lake Superior via the Cross river and a series of other waterways. In back of the dam on our property was a flowage, about a 1/2 mile by a 1/4 mile, and 20 feet deep.

    After the family moved away, the forest service came in and blew up the dam. It was a private structure on private property, but that didn't matter to them. Beavers built dams across the site of the original dam. They blew up the beaver dams many times. Their point of view: Trout couldn't get up beyond the dam. Trout could however, get down through the dam. Without the flowage, trout had no place to winter. Now the stream has to be stocked with trout every year, instead of having a resident population.

    After years of enquiries and use of the freedom of information act, we've finally got documentation that they blew up the dam. We have an ongoing lawsuit against the forest service concerning the dam, and the forest service building a roadway and digging a gravel pit on part of the property - which lawsuit - they will probably drag out for another century. They have finally admitted that their actions were not well thought out. Their reasoning: On their map, our property is color coded as being US public property. Our lawyer's response: "Then why have my clients been paying taxes on it for over 100 years?" Idiots!

    This was one of the best trout fishing streams in Minnesota. It is now rather mediocre fishing.

    End of Rant!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •