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Thread: Loch Lomond from Luss with JimH

  1. #1
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    Default Loch Lomond from Luss with JimH

    I had a PM from JimH a few weeks ago asking for location on Loch Lomond where he could explore on a two night trip. It spurred me on to do the two Loch Lomond reviews and I also said if I was available I would happily show him the area. So arrangements were made and we agreed that we would meet on the 28th and have two nights on the islands. I opted for the Luss area.



    On the 28th Jim turned up at my house as agreed but had no canoe with him just lots of bags. Mmmm. Got to the put in point and, (Cue James Bond music)







    So having sorted out a craft for Jim we got packed and ready to go. In this occasion the Pack really lived up to its name. As well as my normal 3 day camping I had some extra stuff to show Jim as well as having two sleeping bags in case it got cold PLUS I had a 7 man canvas Tipi and groundsheet that weighs in at around 15kg+ Still it all fitted in without any real problem.



    The pack coped well with the load and although lower in the water and slower to get started she moved well and handled well. The wind was low for the full trip so I never did get to see how she would perform with such a load and more "interesting" water.

    So off we set for the campsite. I had decided since it was forecast to be cold that we would camp on the south shore of Inchconnachan. It was the first time I had seen anyone use a folder and Jim seemed quite at home in his. It certainly is a impressive piece of engineering and a capable craft. During the whole trip there was no time when Jim had any problems with it solo and it is certainly more than big enough for two.



    It is actually 16.5 foot long and bigger than it seems in this photo.

    So we got to the camp site and set up. The Tipi for rough weather and just to give it some use and hammocks and tarps for sleeping.



    One of the notable things about Inchconnachan is that it has a population of wild wallabies. Jim had hoped that he would get a chance to see one. Even if it was just a glimpse. As it was we were virtually stalked by one. At one point Jim, sleeping in his hammock, opened his eyes to find a wallaby about 2 feet away.

    So after a pleasant night at camp the 29th dawned and after breakfast we headed of for a paddle. Firewood being a target as well.

    We paddled across to the gap between Inchmoan and Inchcruin then round Inchcruin and back to camp. We actually stopped for a while on the south shore of Inchcruin to cut some firewood from a fallen pine. The availability of firewood near camp being particularly poor.

    After a bite to eat we had a short paddle over to the north west tip of Inchmoan where there is a beached boat and a ruin to explore. We also got some more firewood from a fallen birch.

    That night the weather turned a bit Luckily we had the Tipi and a firebox so while the snow fell



    Actually the fire does keep the tent warm but there is a lot of mucking about with vents to get it to draw properly. Once you have the hang of it I am sure it is fine but Jim and I spent quite a while trying every combination of venting that we could think of. Still it was fun to experiment. Despite the lure of the heated tent we still ended up sleeping in the hammocks which just goes to show you how comfy they are.

    In the morning we had a quick breakfast, broke camp in the rain then paddled the "straights" between Inchconnachan and Inchtavannach then round the north end of Inchtavannach and back to the take out.

    All in all a thoroughly enjoyable couple of days camping and paddling. The requirements of camp and the short days limited the time spent on the water but still allowed enough time to show Jim enough that he is already planning his January visit
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 30th-December-2005 at 09:48 PM.
    John

  2. #2
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    Sounds like a good trip.
    Pity I am so far away must stop and have a good look at Loch Lomond the next time I pass by, looks interesting.
    I like the look of the folder looks like a handy thing to keep in the back of the car. .

    MickT

  3. #3
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    Default Now available in stereo

    I arrived at John's house as arranged on the 28th, and after a brief attempt to give at least a semi-respectable intro to John's partner, we set off.

    As befits seasoned bushcrafters, we epitomised the "Carry less by knowing more" philosophy, by only filling the one LWB Landrover between us for a 2 day trip.

    Not a lot to say that hasn't been ably recounted by John already. We paddled out to Inchconnochan on the first afternoon, perhaps a couple of miles (being an idiot I failed to set my GPS up on the first day, so no idea of the route). Camp was set up well before dark, and a quick dash round the South end of the island on foot revealed a fallen pine that we cut a few rounds from and lugged them back to camp, where I helpfully watched John split them down for firewood. I cooked dinner which seemed the least I could do after John had logged all the firewood. The (well, *my*) washing up was left for the morning, but a rather helpful wallaby did it in the middle of the night.


    Second day paddles were an explore round Inchcruin (anticlockwise) with a pause to dismember another deadfall pine limb, and a quick trip to Inchmoan to look over an apparently abandoned cruiser (very odd) and to chop up a fallen birch to add to the woodstore. We saw an albino fallow deer (I assumed it was a goat at first)

    John's Pack canoe was pretty nippy and lovely to paddle (I had a quick play on our return). Made mine feel like a bit of a barge.

    The Kelly Kettle, which I'd been swearing at as a leaky P.O.S. since we got there sealed up and with dry twigs worked a treat. John drank more tea in a day than the preceding 362 of the year (I was a bit obsessed once I got it working)

    Second night it snowed maybe 3-4", but the hammock setup was cosy, although I started off hugely ecumbered by trying to use a bivi bag with it - this was soon ditched improving comfort hugely. I need a bigger tarp...

    My Kelly Kettle obsession paid me back with numerous wake-up calls in the night. Chilly.

    Returned the following lunchtime after breaking camp, via a different route round the north end of Inchtavannach.

    All told, a cracking trip. I want to go again. John is an excellent guide, and seemed wholly unfazed at being accompanied by a crazed Hillbilly lookalike paddling an oversized windsock of a boat (wind fortuitously light all 3 days).

    I have a mapsource (Garmin GPS) tracklog of days 2 &3 if anyone's interested - it's a bit rubbish as the GPS is still set up to record too few points as a legacy from motorbike use. I also have some pics but I need to crop them and suss how to upload them.

    Cheers,

    Jim.

  4. #4
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    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong
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    Nice travelogue gents.
    It's always good to see other peoples set-ups too, makes you think about your own ...

    Interesting looking boat there too Jim ... I kinda think the whole hillbilly look goes well with an open boat.

    I'd read something about your wallabies, were they not originally planned to be part of a wildlife park plan that then never went through, and the little wallabies were just released out onto the island ?

    They've done well to adapt.
    Last edited by monkey_pork; 31st-December-2005 at 04:55 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork

    ...hillbilly look goes well with an open boat.
    (checks monkey_pork profile)

    Dang right, cuz


    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork

    ...wallabies...

    They've done well to adapt.
    Quite. No idea of the back-story, though. There used to be a small colony in the Peak District, but they are now presumed extinct, I believe. They were apparently escapees from some local mansion in the 40s.

    It was supposedly the harsh winters that did for them, but that would seem at odds with their survival in Scotland. Too small a gene pool would be my guess, as there can't have been too many in the seed population.

    (I'm straying off topic, I sense )

    The boat is the result of space restrictions (storage and transport), but I'm getting happier with it as I gain some marginal degree of competence...

    I'd love to pick your brains about the sailing rig you use, though with a view to bodging rather than buying...

    TTFN,

    Jim.

  6. #6
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    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimH
    (checks monkey_pork profile)

    Dang right, cuz


    Quote Originally Posted by JimH
    I'd love to pick your brains about the sailing rig you use, though with a view to bodging rather than buying...
    PM sent. We'll pull that chat out into a thread maybe later on ...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey_pork
    I'd read something about your wallabies, were they not originally planned to be part of a wildlife park plan that then never went through, and the little wallabies were just released out onto the island ?

    They've done well to adapt.
    From this page

    http://www.loch-lomond.net/islands/inchconnachan.html

    A 1920's wooden bungalow is situated near to the narrows and was previously the holiday home of Lady Arran Colquhoun who introduced wallabies to the island. The wallabies roamed wild and the wallabies can still be seen today, if you are lucky.
    Don't know about the lucky to see them part. Unless you have a dog with you it is pretty hard to avoid them
    John

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    Don't know about the lucky to see them part.
    ...I think it means you'll be lucky if you spot the little before they raid your chocolate!

    DAMHIK.

    Jim.

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