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Thread: Hammocks

  1. #1
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    Default Hammocks

    Since the group buy for hammocks stopped my plans have changed and I now want a hammock...

    Anyway, being both a cheapskate and a fatty I'm looking for something big and cheap. I had been looking at http://www.mosquitohammock.com/ but worried that it might feel a bit narrow and claustraphobic.

    What are your opinions on this set-up?:

    Tarp: 3x4m from the group buy
    Hammock: Paradise Hammocks double
    Mozzy net: Single green thing from ebay

    It was the mozzy net I was really gettting stuck finding as I wanted it to be dark coloured, and midge proof. Hoping I'll be bitten by the hammock bug, not millions of midges

  2. #2
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    I would not worry about the weight side of things too much. I know a lot of large men using a lot of different hammocks on BCUK and weight is never really an issue.

    How tall you are can be an issue but I doubt it will be for a woman. I am 6 foot 3 and the group buy ones are tall enough for me.

    I have a Paradise hammock and they are almost identical to the group buy ones but are up to half a meter longer. Stuart Blink has a paradise hammock that is 2.9m long and mine is 3.2m long. They are slightly more comfy for me because I am so tall but the group buy ones are still very comfy for me. I findI keep changing between the two as the shorter hammock is better protected from the elements but the longer hammock is more comfortable.

    As to the midgie netting I have not seen the one you linked to before and would be interested to see it set up. I have not heard of anyone using it so cant really comment. Another option is the Ecosystem netting but at over £45 it is not in the same price bracket. The group buy insect netting is very similar to the ecosystem one but is a bit bigger in every direction to accommodate larger hammocks. This weekend at Loch Achray there were about 6 of us using the group buy insect nettings in some of the most extreme midgie conditions you can imagine and they all held up.

    Now after all that I can confirm that I have one group buy hammock left from the last buy. Turns out I had put the same person on the list twice. So I had two extra but Big Al snapped up the first. The other is yours if you want it but do not tell anyone on BCUK as there are already about 14 registered for the next batch. I also can do you a midgie net as I kept quite a few for myself and can spare one.

  3. #3

    Default Hammocks

    It really is very easy to make your own hammock. You need a piece of ripstop nylon about 3m long and 1.5m wide. Hem the edge all the way round. Gather the end together by repeatedly folding or pleating layers to get a tight bundle. With some thin cord or whipping twine, whip around the bundle for a couple of cm and secure. Repeat for the other end.
    Take a couple of meters of 6mm rope. Make a loop about 15cm long at one end with a figure 8. Make a larks foot knot and slide the whiped end of the hammock into the loop, pull on the rope to tighten up. Repeat for the other end.
    Tie outs at the side help make things a bit more liveable.
    You will need some webbing to make tree huggers, prob about 3m times 2. Tie loops in each end for fixing the hammock to. Look at the Hennesy website for the knots or use 'biners.
    If anyone is interested I'll post the pictures. Costs about £15 and takes about an hour.

    Chris
    "All right" said Eeyore "We're going. Only don't blame me"

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  4. #4
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    If anyone is interested I'll post the pictures
    Yes please!

    We have made hammocks for the large green fishing nets washed up around the coast.

    Could you make a hammock from a tarp?

    You could make a midge net from this?http://www.profabrics.co.uk/shop/sho...hp?id=MM351-99

    Nigel

  5. #5

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    I'm interested too! What about making a double skinned one?

  6. #6
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    Hi Chris,
    I'd certainly be interested in seeing some pictures!
    best
    Matt

  7. #7
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    I took delivery of of a DD Hammock today, decided that for the price it was as easy to buy than make.

    http://www.ddhammocks.com/Products/index.htm

    Looks OK and off to put it up this evening along with my SOTP offer tarp!!

    Nigel

  8. #8

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    Looks like a bargain! Remember to get some webbing to make some treehugger straps so that you don't ring bark the trees.

    Chris
    "All right" said Eeyore "We're going. Only don't blame me"

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  9. #9
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    The DD hammocks use tape instead of rope so you should not damage the tree anyway but it is a point worth making.

  10. #10

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    Come on Chris, we're all (or at least I am) holding our breaths waiting for the photos .
    Peter

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterkm
    Come on Chris, we're all (or at least I am) holding our breaths waiting for the photos .
    Peter
    Me too

    Matt

  12. #12

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    Just a point worth making the DD HAMMOCKS are cheaper to buy direct from NIGEL P's link ,tonnes of 'em on evil-bay but they work out dearer with postage!!

  13. #13
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    Strung? Pitched? Hitched? the hammock last night. The rope is as stated a broad flat tape so should be OK for the trees. The hammock is fine and the cocoon bit should be warm in the winter. Only got difficult when I put a thermarest into it!! Need another solution for cold weather conditions. Cant wait to try it out properly.

    How cold does it get in a hammock? What solutions for this?

    Nigel

  14. #14

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    Try placing your mat inside your sleeping bag,and if you are uncomfortable try using a sleeping bag liner between you and the mat,
    my better half has just bought two of these off E-bay without me knowing as a surprise,I was surprised by the price difference could have saved £10,
    let us know how you get on with it.

  15. #15

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    I see that there's 3 models of the DD Hammock, which one's the best then?

  16. #16
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    I see that there's 3 models of the DD Hammock, which one's the best then?
    I think there are two models and they sell the travel one with a fly as well in one price. I got the camping one without the net as I wanted to use it in cooler weather and did not want the net 'hanging about'. I am going to try a camping mat in sleeping bag, narrower karrimat, or use a non down bag that might not compress as much during the night.

    Nigel

  17. #17

    Default Making a Hammock

    Materials
    3 metres of lightweight nylon or polyester- between 70 and 120 g/sq.metre. Uncoated is best as it allows body vapour to pass through, though if you may want to use it as a ground sheet go for something with a PU coating. I used Ripstop Pertex 6, but you may want to choose a heavier fabric if you are a bit bigger build.

    Whipping twine or very thin cord. I used Dacron kite line as it was laying around at the time.

    20cm of lightweight webbing or grosgrain ribbon.

    40cm of 3mm shock cord

    4m of Lightweight cord for guylines

    3 metres of 5mm climbing cord or sailing rope (polyester braid on braid)

    6m plus of 40mm webbing.

    All the fabrics are available from www.profabrics.co.uk or www.pennineoutdoor.co.uk The cheapest place I’ve found for climbing cord is www.upandunder.co.uk

    The fabric needs to be a metre longer then you are tall to allow for the taper at the ends. If you are the same height as me this should allow you to cut a strip off the end to make the stuff sack for your hammock at the end- If you have some other material or a spare one that you can use then no problem, use the whole piece!

    Hem all round the edge, turning the raw edge under to avoid fraying.

    Lay out the fabric and taking one end, fold the two corners in to the middle. Keep folding so that you end up with a tight bunch of fabric that you can hold between your thumb and forefinger.

    Now use your whipping twine to put at least 25mm of tight whipping around the bunch. Leave a couple of cm of fabric sticking out, just to be on the safe side.


    Whipping

    Repeat for the other end. This will give you your basic hammock shape.

    In use I’ve found that as with the Hennessy Hammock side pulls help to keep the hammock shape open and make it more user friendly. Cut your lightweight webbing in two and seal the ends with a gas flame. Fold in half and stitch a piece on either side of the hammock at the mid point to form a loop on either side. Cut the 3mm shock cord in half, thread through the webbing on one side and tie in a loop with an overhand knot.

    Repeat with the other half.


    To fix the main ropes, cut the 5mm cord in half and heat seal the ends. In each piece tie a loop around 150mm long: use a figure 8 or similar rather than a simple overhand knot.

    Lay the loop on your work surface and place a hammock end on top. Bend the end of the loop up and around the hammock and bring the rope end up through the loop. The knot on the rope should pass through the loop to tighten around the hammock and form what is known as a lark’s head knot. The whipping should be just outside this knot.


    Lark's Head Knot

    Repeat for the other end.

    To make the “Tree Huggers” you will need to cut your 40mm webbing in half, hot seal the ends and form a loop in each of the four ends. If you are confident in your sewing then stitch the loops, otherwise tie figure eight knots etc.


    hammock under home made assymetric tarp


    These straps go round the trees and then you tie your hammock on to the loops. Make sure you use a knot that you can loosen even after it’s had a night of being loaded. Have a look at the www.hennessyhammock.com for lots of info. on this. There is even a nifty video showing how to do it.

    Your side guys attach to the 3mm shock cord and help to prevent the hammock from swaying from side to side and hold your hammock open. They can be pegged to the ground or tied off to the tarp

    When pitching your tarp its best to make sure the hammock is well up to the underside of the tarp. The best way of doing this is to actually fix the hammock higher up the tree than the tarp.





    To stop rain running down the tarp ropes, tie a handkerchief or other scrap of cotton cloth around the ropes.

    Hope that's all straightforward

    Sorry it's taken me so long to post this.

    Chris
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 7th-July-2006 at 07:51 PM. Reason: Fix Font
    "All right" said Eeyore "We're going. Only don't blame me"

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  18. #18

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    Thanks Chris, Wow! But I have to admit, out of ignorance, I'd be dubious about trusting my weight on the Larks Head knot as it's pictured. I'm sure its perfectly fine as you've oviously used it. I just think it looks as if it may slip off the hammock when under weight - but obviously not (if you pardon the pun)
    Peter

  19. #19
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    Great post Chris. Another for the main site when I get the chance and as long as you approve.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by peterkm
    I'd be dubious about trusting my weight on the Larks Head knot as it's pictured. I'm sure its perfectly fine as you've oviously used it. I just think it looks as if it may slip off the hammock when under weight - but obviously not (if you pardon the pun)
    Peter
    I did wonder too, but seems OK. Probably worth checking that it is in place before jumping in. The stranglehold on the fabric is pretty tight. I have seen a few people advocate tyeing a knot in the hammock fabric but this does look a bit ungainly and doesn't appear necessary.

    If you think it's useful, no problem with putting it on the main site.

    Chris
    "All right" said Eeyore "We're going. Only don't blame me"

    www.canoepaddler.me.uk

  21. #21
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    DD Hammock

    I missed the Group Buy on hammocks but instead bought a DD Hammock. I choose the DD camping hammock for the smaller size and weight should I want to use it for backpacking and the like.

    Packed up the hammock comes as small sausage measuring approximately 30 by 8 cm and weighs 700 grams; 240 grams of this is the 9 metres of green webbing rope for securing to trees etc. The hammock is basically two pieces of green light weight nylon material stitched along one long edge and sewn over each end to form a wide hem through which the tape goes.



    Puling the tape tight gathers in the ends and forms the hammock shape. Laying on both peices of fabric forms an open hammock. Laying on just the bottom with the top piece pulled over forms a snug cocoon to keep out the light, and beasties.

    Initially I pitched the hammock in some trees behind my house to see what it was like…..

    Pitching

    Well hanging the hammock was well, as easy as tying two ropes to two trees and playing about with the tension on one to get the right sag. I had a Tatonka 3m x 3m tarp (did not miss this group buy!) also and on first trial was able to string this up diagonally to create an airy space underneath.



    Getting in and out

    The easiest way to get in is to sit onto the hammock and swing legs and body across and lay down letting the swinging motion subside a bit before adjusting the bodies trim and position. To pull myself up the hammock I put both arms behind my head and grasped the ropes pulling to slide my body up to a comfortable position.

    Mat and netting

    I did try the hammock with a Thermarest mat but found it would jump out of the mat with only a small amount of moving about and was even harder to keep in place when wriggling about with a sleeping bag (see behaviour modification). I had a small midge net that hung in a wedge shape and tried suspended this from a cord strung out between the two tress and passing underneath the tarp, it was however less thatn successful so knew I would have to make some modifications to the net for the field test.


    Field test-Hammock virginity lost!

    Friday evening I paddled round to a favourite spot on Newtown Creek where I had camped before and set about making my ‘hammocky’ camp, no turning back now as a retreating tide would maroon me for the night (not an altogether unpleasant prospect). I had a couple of hours before dark to setup and had found a good spot amongst a clump of trees alongside the creeks edge with gap’s that offered views across the estuary and salt marsh beyond.

    Newtown creek early morning View



    Again pitching the hammock was easy once I had found tress sufficiently wide enough apart and with few overhanging branches to catch the tarp. I had to pitch the tarp mid-ways as the trees were not wide quite wide enough. Though this did cover each end of the hammock for wetter weather a diagonal pitch would have been better to keep dry. The midge net was improved with elastic hanging ties along the top edge and at each end to gather the net in and spread it out lengthways. My barrel provided a table and steadier when the hammock swung too much. A full length Thermarest was placed inside the sleeping bag with the ends folded over to accommodate the tapering of the hammock. During the night it was necessary to readjust the sleeping bag and mat and once it had popped out over the hammocks edge in the small hours I gave up and slept through with the mat half on and half off the hammock. By 6.00 AM I got up and made tea on the firebox anyway. Still despite a few problems it was a good night and well worth pursuing using a hammock as an alternative to sleeping on the ground.

    Behaviour modification

    To keep the thermo rest in place at night I have stitched 4 keeper straps to the base of the hammock that are positioned to hold a ¾ length mat.

    For the head end of the hammock I have glued an old foam mat together to make it double thick and cut it to fit both the tapered end of the hammock and to slid under the Thermorest and against the keeper straps.



    In test this prevented the mat from sliding about despite a lot of jigging about and kept an adequate shape to the hammock. Whilst the mat folds slightly enough of the body is on the mat to make it comfortable and prevent coolness.

  22. #22

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    recieved my DD hammock on thursday morning,only ordered them on wednesday afternoon so cant beat that for service,and it is really is a bargain although a little shorter than I would like I'm 5' 10ish,
    I used it over the weekend and found I didnt need a roll mat, I'm using an ex army sleeping bag they are ideal for hammocks because of the central zip which makes it so easy to get in and out of,and because of the waterproof base they dont move about plus if you want a bit of extra security you can secure the bag to the hammock with the toggles that are used to roll the bag up.

  23. #23
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    'm using an ex army sleeping bag
    I looked into those and may get one to use purely for canoeing. I wanted a lightweight solution for walking, cycling and backpacking.

    although a little shorter than I would like
    That was why I tried a 3/4 mat instead of a fuller length one which I found was too long and popped out.

    Is there any padding on the bottom of the army sleeping bags or just a waterproof layer, and are they very warm?

    I am thinking of getting some fabric and making a hammock purely for winter use with a sleeve for a super wide mat and side pockets to stuff in clothing for insulation.. On the 'Bushcraft forum' there are many links to sites where people use hammocks as real alternative to a tent in winter!

    Nigel

  24. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nigelp
    I looked into those and may get one to use purely for canoeing. I wanted a lightweight solution for walking, cycling and backpacking.]



    That was why I tried a 3/4 mat instead of a fuller length one which I found was too long and popped out.

    [Is there any padding on the bottom of the army sleeping bags or just a waterproof layer, and are they very warm?]

    I am thinking of getting some fabric and making a hammock purely for winter use with a sleeve for a super wide mat and side pockets to stuff in clothing for insulation.. On the 'Bushcraft forum' there are many links to sites where people use hammocks as real alternative to a tent in winter!

    Nigel
    I bought them for the canoe so the bulk isnt a problem,although they are down filled I havent had any problems with them,they seem to work better in the hammock,I've just been through 24 hours of constant rain and its been fine.
    It's just a waterproof layer underneath so I reckon you could cut this to make a pocket for a really big,thick thermarest.
    I would have no doubts about using my current set up in winter,my major pain with winter camping is condensation,which I'm hoping will be minimal with a hammock and tarp.
    If you get the opportunity to inspect the ex-army bags in person check for manufacturers labels,I was lucky and got a down filled "NORTH FACE"one for 20 quid on E-bay

  25. #25
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    At the moment, on BushcraftUK, there is a group buy going on for a underblanket for use with hammocks. Might be worth having a look at if you are going to get serious with your hammock use. I have an underblanket and it is great. I will be testing the group buy one sin the next couple of weeks.

  26. #26
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    I have been lurking on Bushcraft UK and may consider one once they post pics and a review. I am sure they will run another as demand will surely be quite high.

    Would an under blanket completely eliminate the need for a mat etc?

    Nigel

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelp
    Would an under blanket completely eliminate the need for a mat etc?
    Yes. Some people even use a sort of blanket instead of a sleeping bag as well.

  28. #28

    Default Hammocks

    Try these Hammocks out there massive and easy to carry. I got mine next day worth a look. www.ddhammocks.com

  29. #29

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    I have a Hennessy Hammock Expedition asym. I used it mainly in forests from May to September and its brilliant. http://www.hennessyhammock.com/catalogue.htm
    For canoests have a look at the following picture to see what you can do http://www.hennessyhammock.com/photos.htm
    Its also got this award. By the way i'm just an enthusiast for the product. Not a sales person
    Best Camping Shelter 2005
    Sea Kayaker Magazine Readers Choice Award



  30. #30
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    The Hennessys are a top piece of kit. I have one and it was how I got converted to hammock camping but I still found them enclosed feeling, which is why I switched to an open hammock.

  31. #31

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    Not a sales man, thanks all the same. Just a bit of good advice looks like it was an apt opportunity for you to advertise thou. I was impressed at how quickly i got the dd camping hammock and the small in the bag it packed into. Just an all round good piece of kit to take on the water with you so you can easily use for a seat when having lunch on the bank. The ddhammock website looks really proffessional as well.


    http://www.ddhammocks.com/gallery.html



    http://www.ddhammocks.com/products.html

    nigelp seems to agree as well. vbmenu_register("postmenu_10200", true);

  32. #32

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    I may buy a Hennessy Hammock to see how they compair but the DD Camping Hammock is something you can either get in and cacoon yourself up in from the wind or use as an open hammock as it is so large.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushman
    looks like it was an apt opportunity for you to advertise thou.
    Not sure I understand this comment. If you are referring to my comments about the group buy hammocks, I would be happy not to have to import these. I do not make any money on it and do it as a service to the SotP and BCUK members. I have run 6 group buys for 50 hammocks each time and since the second one, I think, there has been mention of Nick's hammocks in the group buy posting. Indeed he offered a discount to BCUK members and I highlighted this as I thought it may negate the need for me to do more group buys.

  34. #34

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    Magikelly you've got the wrong end of the stick.

    When he was saying I was a sales man
    I was refering to

    quote

    Daneel

    "I have a Hennessy Hammock Expedition asym. I used it mainly in forests from May to September and its brilliant. http://www.hennessyhammock.com/catalogue.htm
    For canoests have a look at the following picture to see what you can do http://www.hennessyhammock.com/photos.htm
    Its also got this award. By the way i'm just an enthusiast for the product. Not a sales person
    Best Camping Shelter 2005
    Sea Kayaker Magazine Readers Choice Award


    "

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushman
    Magikelly you've got the wrong end of the stick.
    My mistake.

  36. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelp View Post
    I have been lurking on Bushcraft UK and may consider one once they post pics and a review. I am sure they will run another as demand will surely be quite high.

    Would an under blanket completely eliminate the need for a mat etc?

    Nigel
    If your still struggling with the roll mat idea,I came up with this Idea that might solve your problem,
    I had a cheap 'GELERT' lightweight hammock,the net ones,lying about and found that if I clipped it underneath the hammock I could use it for storing kit and keep it off the ground,so with a bit of adjustment you should be able to use whatever your carrying as insulation,and they only cost around £7 from highstreet camping shops.

  37. #37
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    Tips for the AsymTarp making ?

    Nick

  38. Default

    i use an ex army hammock that was also built as a stretcher! 2 alloy bars at the neds to keep it spread out but they are`not really needed. Try anchor supplies, don't know their web address but search on that. or go to a game fair /4wd show as they are always there

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