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Thread: Wood fire Trangia

  1. #1
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    Default Wood fire Trangia

    I use a Trangia with a gas conversion but like an open fire to which end I made a Nimblewill Nomad stove. Unfortunately the aluminium was a bit thin and it went bendy.
    I have just bought a 2.5 pint Kelly kettle (the group buy price was hard to resist) but can't see the fire pan being much use as an open fire pan. I'd guess that it is difficult to feed.
    That made me take a fresh look at my Trangia base and windshield. If I cut a circle of aluminium to fill the burner hole I'd have a fire pan raised off the floor and with pot rests already built in. Smoke would get out around the pans all it needs is a hole in the side to feed bits of wood in. I could make a flap to close of the hole when using the gas burner.
    Before I start with the tinsnips can anybody see, or know of, a flaw with this?

  2. #2
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    Not sure how well your plan would work but I know that Chris Randall makes a small firebox which has a stand you can get so you can use it with your trangia when there is not enough wood around.
    John

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    Not sure how well your plan would work but I know that Chris Randall makes a small firebox which has a stand you can get so you can use it with your trangia when there is not enough wood around.
    Cheers, but that is another bit of kit to carry. I'd like to make the Trangia multi roll.

  4. #4
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    Yes but you could stop carrying the tyrannic cookset and just use the firebox or firebox with trangia burner adaptor. So instead of making the trangia multi task you are making the firebox multi task.

    Either way there is a picture and a little more info on this thread

    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=578

    I am sure Chris will not mind me posting his picture here

    John

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    Yes but you could stop carrying the tyrannic cookset and just use the firebox or firebox with trangia burner adaptor. So instead of making the trangia multi task you are making the firebox multi task.
    Now that is good thinking. I can't do that; I tend to think in straight lines
    :0(

    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    I am sure Chris will not mind me posting his picture here
    Not his best side I take it :0)

    Thanks for the help, I'll give it some more thought.
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 26th-June-2006 at 07:32 PM. Reason: Fix quote tags

  6. #6
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    [quote=Nobby]I use a Trangia with a gas conversion but like an open fire to which end I made a Nimblewill Nomad stove. Unfortunately the aluminium was a bit thin and it went bendy.

    Nobby
    The reason it went bendy is because you had annealed the aluminium

    getting aluminium hot and then cooling it slowly will anneale it , if you cool it quickly it gets back it's temper

    Aluminium is not a suitable material for your application
    Thank you

    John O'Connell
    -------------------------------------
    O C Outdoor
    Web page www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor
    --------------------------------------

  7. #7
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    I would watch out. while on holiday I desided to use my army tranger wind shield as a charcoal chimney starter for the bbq in the gite by making a coke can rack to site on the pan stand and some al foil.

    It worked a treat but in the process burt off all the blacking and it is now quite a bit softer than before.

    But it it got the bbq going in no time

    Edit: Sorry Joc Just seen your post.


    I havent lost my mind, I've got it backed up on tape somewhere!!

  8. #8
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    Default Wood fire Trangia

    Quote Originally Posted by clcuckow
    I would watch out. while on holiday I desided to use my army tranger wind shield as a charcoal chimney starter for the bbq in the gite by making a coke can rack to site on the pan stand and some al foil.

    It worked a treat but in the process burt off all the blacking and it is now quite a bit softer than before.

    But it it got the bbq going in no time

    Edit: Sorry Joc Just seen your post.
    clcuckow
    why bite the bullet if you want to do that sort of thing got to
    www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor it's my site, have a look at the Fire-Spout Mini

    It will ignite the charcoal and make a brew at the same time
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 2nd-August-2006 at 09:31 AM. Reason: Fix link
    Thank you

    John O'Connell
    -------------------------------------
    O C Outdoor
    Web page www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor
    --------------------------------------

  9. #9
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    .....and it's post free to SotP members!
    Obscured by Clouds

    Clipper Prospector 16

    http://lostcoast.blogspot.com

  10. #10
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    Default Useful Info

    This thread started me thinging about how to convert my trangia also. I've some ideas for the Trangia 27 modle with a 1.75l pan converted to the fire pit as the full 27 stove fits perfectly on top of it. I'll let you know how I get on as it will be a winter project to do the work.

    In looking around, I fount these two websites, both American but one,
    http://zenstoves.net/StoveChoices.htm is an excellent resourse for comparing stoves of all types with their pros and cons (love the name, man!). This one, http://www.littlbug.com/index.htm, looks to fit the bill although I could not find a shipping price from the US to the UK. Has anyone any experience of this one?
    Chris


  11. #11
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    Default Woodstoves,Cubexs and Reflectors

    We use a siera stove which burns small twigs. I use mine when out on the estuary as the dry reeds are great for it, and volcano kettles (people now call them kellys) A few folk in my club got them after running out of fuel and being stormbound in glen Coul bothy a few new years ago. It is just a wee blast furnance which preheats the air going into the wood by a small fan. They have been out for years as an eco cooker. Surprised there is not pages devoted to it in SotP. We also have an original volcano kettle, a folding cubex oven and a variety of home made reflector ovens.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowghillie View Post
    We use a siera stove which burns small twigs. I use mine when out on the estuary as the dry reeds are great for it, and volcano kettles (people now call them kellys) A few folk in my club got them after running out of fuel and being stormbound in glen Coul bothy a few new years ago. It is just a wee blast furnance which preheats the air going into the wood by a small fan. They have been out for years as an eco cooker. Surprised there is not pages devoted to it in SotP. We also have an original volcano kettle, a folding cubex oven and a variety of home made reflector ovens.
    These look interesting, a couple of questions if I may:

    Can they be used without damaging the grass or whatever they are placed on? From the picture it appears this might be possible.

    Is the fan truly useful or just a gimmick? Do you know how effective they are compared to something like the pocket stove which uses a natural chimney effect to generate it's airflow.

    Is there a UK supplier?

    Ok, thats three not two :-)
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  13. #13
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    Default Siera Stoves from a serious stovie

    The fan with its two speeds is essential to blast the air. It sits of the ground on its own base and does not burn the grass. It is hotter than a pocket stove and is controllable. Hotter because of the double wall preheating the air and very light. It is an evolved pocket stove. Try a comparison in boiling a pint with the same amount of fuel. Thats what I do with all stoves since I inherited a collection. Nothing beats a Primus though.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowghillie View Post
    The fan with its two speeds is essential to blast the air. It sits of the ground on its own base and does not burn the grass. It is hotter than a pocket stove and is controllable. Hotter because of the double wall preheating the air and very light. It is an evolved pocket stove. Try a comparison in boiling a pint with the same amount of fuel. Thats what I do with all stoves since I inherited a collection. Nothing beats a Primus though.
    Thanks. I've had a look at their site and it looks interesting - if a little unstable. Can we get them over here or is it an order over the web?

    As for primus stoves, you must be joking. I once had a couple of old brass primus stoves that weighed a ton, didn't hold their pressure and sooted up their jets like no tomorrow. Unless you are talking about the modern ones of course which seem much of a muchness with the MSRs I use (whisperlite and pocket rocket) and decent bits of kit.
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  15. #15
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    Default Siera Stoves

    Yes they are a bit unstable and the pocket stove can take bigger pots. As a backpacking stove they are good. Primus and Optimus stoves are great if they are in good repair. We use the all the time when weight is not an issue canoeing and sea kayaking. We use parafin in our central heating so it is still very cheap. Bill Mason recommends the petrol optimus in Song o.t.P. and a few year ago you could get one for 20 army surplus. These stoves will boil a litre of water faster than any modern one on the market. Lots of third world homes still cook on large primus type stoves and we have a fantastic double burner range for power cuts. Our central hearing is just a big primus with an electric pump and timer.

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